3

We can speak of both making someone do something (your 'make + pronoun + verb), meaning cause them to do it or force them to do it and making them [adjective], meaning cause them to be in a certain condition. "It makes me excited" is the second usage.


2

John comes to meet me at the station every Friday. Question: Who comes to meet you at the station every Friday? Who as a question takes the third person singular, even if the answer involves two people. In the question, 'who' is the subject. John and Mary come to meet me at the station every Friday.


2

Well, naturally we are going to use 'comes' since that's the grammar. However, if it's more than one person we should use the word 'people' in the sentence to indicate more than one person which doesn't necessarily contain the word 'come'. Some examples: Who are the people who are going to meet you? Who are the people who come to visit you every evening?


2

The verb always agrees with the subject, regardless of word order. You have correctly identified the subject of the sentence as "homework", which is a singular collective noun. So, you should use the singular form of the verb: "What classes is the homework for." It may sound strange, because the word order is inverted and the verb comes ...


1

"Couple" is a collective noun and can be treated as either singular or plural. So that means both of your examples are correct. Here's another example from Cambridge Dictionaries Online: An elderly couple live (US lives) next door. The parenthetical supplement "US lives" implies that the singular agreement is more common in the US than ...


1

The subject is "Their time on house cleaning and child care". The noun in this subject is "time", which is singular, so the verb should be "comes". The prepositional phrase "on house cleaning..." is a modifier and doesn't change the singular status of the noun "time".


1

The main clause is "Does anyone know if they're open?". The subordinate clause is "that goes to my gym". Take the main clause first. When you have an auxiliary verb, the main verb (or non-auxiliary verb) is always non-finite (which means no inflection for person, tense or number). So, we say "she can be" (not "can is&...


1

The sentence is: He is brave. The subject is "he," so the conjugated form of to be is is. The parenthetical clause "as well as I" is inserted into the sentence, but this does not change what the subject is, so it does not change the form of the verb either. But this is an awkward phrasing. I would prefer "He is brave, as am I" ...


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