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14 votes

Omitting 'that' in this sentence

Others have explained why you can't simply omit the "that". However, in this case it would be idiomatic to omit "that is", leaving "There is so much at stake for many."
Especially Lime's user avatar
14 votes

What is the subject of the sentence "Inside were mounds of gold coins"?

Inside were mounds of gold coins The subject is "mounds of gold coins". The sentence exhibits what is called 'subject-dependent inversion'. Here the locational dependent "inside" has been inverted ...
BillJ's user avatar
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10 votes
Accepted

Can an adjective be a subject

That isn't actually using an adjective as a subject. It's just an inversion of "Her eyes that shone like diamonds and her lips held in a steady smile were unforgettable." This kind of ...
stangdon's user avatar
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10 votes
Accepted

Do the subject and object have to agree in number? For example: "Tigers (plural) are a wild animal (singular)"

No, subjects and complements do not have to agree in number. Objects, which are a special type of complement, do not need to either. Examples: This penguin likes tigers. Singular subject, plural ...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

'Mice IS the scourge of the fields' <-- Plural noun - is/are - predicate noun

Video games is the way to go. Mice is the scourge of fields. Oats was the food to eat. Sentence (1) is borderline. You might well encounter sentences like this. Sentence (2) is ungrammatical. ...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

Two questions about the 4th verse of "The Star-Spangled Banner"

In the English of the nineteenth century, and to some extent today, "shall" in the second or third person expresses determination, obligation or volition. This was never a subjunctive, ...
James K's user avatar
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8 votes

What is the subject in the sentence "Rice is being cooked by Mary"?

I thought that the subject is that which acts, and the object is that which is acted upon. This is often true in an active-voice sentence, but not in a passive-voice sentence. That which acts/is ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Omitting 'that' in this sentence

No, the relative pronoun that cannot be omitted in the sentence "There is so much (that) is at stake for many". This is because that functions as the subject of the defining relative clause that is ...
Shoe's user avatar
  • 3,015
8 votes

Can an adjective be a subject

Can a single adjective be a subject? Yes. English allows adjective nominalization, that is, the use of an adjective as a noun. You usually see this with “the,” as in “the rich,” “the poor,” though ...
KRyan's user avatar
  • 4,973
7 votes

What is the subject of the sentence "Inside were mounds of gold coins"?

The quoted sentence is an example of an inverted sentence. Unlike a standard sentence, which has the order [subject] [verb] [complement/nothing (depending on the verb)], it begins with the complement,...
SteveES's user avatar
  • 4,669
7 votes
Accepted

Subject and Predicate in 'The cackling of geese saved Rome.'

English is quite strict about word order. In factual sentences (i.e. not questions or some other rarer forms) the subject must precede the verb. English has no way of marking nouns that are subjects ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
7 votes

What is the function of "there" in the structure, "There is/are/..."?

There were fifteen cats and an eviction notice on Janet's front porch. This is an existential construction, where there is not an adverb but a dummy pronoun functioning as subject of the sentence. It'...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.2k
7 votes

Can I remove the subject, as in "It's helpful as removes pain"?

No, the subject can't be removed, but you can use a pronoun instead of repeating the subject noun. For example: Aspirin is helpful, as it removes pain.
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 7,889
7 votes

Two questions about the 4th verse of "The Star-Spangled Banner"

As JamesK’s answer says, “shall” marks a future tense, nothing more. Well, possibly with a sense of determination (they’re determined to stand up and defend their homes) rather than simply occurring ...
Tim Pederick's user avatar
  • 8,335
7 votes

Do the subject and object have to agree in number? For example: "Tigers (plural) are a wild animal (singular)"

No, the subject and object of a verb don't have to agree: A man eats some chips. The subject (man) is singular and the object (chips) is plural. In your example, you don't have an object, but a ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
7 votes

'Mice IS the scourge of the fields' <-- Plural noun - is/are - predicate noun

YES: Plural Noun - BE - Predicate-Noun, that's right, but see below. If something is seen as a unit or category, the singular can be used. Video games is or are the way [to go]. [seen as a category ...
Lambie's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

Why place "both" and "all" after an auxiliary verb such as "have"?

The phenomenon presented in your question is called "Quantifier Floating". In English grammar, quantifier floating is the syntactic process by which a subject-related quantifier (all, both, or each) ...
whitedevil's user avatar
6 votes

Forward or backward subject verb agreement

In each case you figure out what the verb is, then the subject. It's not the position of the verb relative to the subject that matters. In Using this rule enable(s) us to do X. the verb is clearly &...
Ethan Bolker's user avatar
  • 7,123
6 votes

What is the subject of the “sizzled”?

I think it should be in instead of into: At this, the man coughed and walked over to a can of water, throwing something into that sizzled for a split second. Or it could be missing it: At this, the ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 7,889
5 votes
Accepted

"Whether he met them (it) is not clear." Do I have to insert an ''it''?

We can use clauses as Subjects in English: [That she refused your offer] is not surprising. [Whether you like it] is not important. In the sentences above we see a declarative clause and an ...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
5 votes

How can I explain this "Who" question simply to my student?

Rules for making wh-questions. First locate the missing information: You taught ___? Select the correct wh-word and insert it into this space: You taught who? If, and only if, you ...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
5 votes

Marking the functions of a sentence: 'She may like it'

She may [ like it ]. Traditionally "may like" has been taken as a constituent (and commonly called 'the verb’). There was a lot of argument about this in the 70s, and many have come round to the view ...
BillJ's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Why did Jobs use "it" instead of "they" in this interview?

That is a dummy "it." The pronoun "it" in that sentence does not refer to anything; it is simply a way of rephrasing the sentence But if computer science hadn't existed, these ...
randomhead's user avatar
  • 21.1k
5 votes

What is the function of "there" in the structure, "There is/are/..."?

In this particular sentence, it's acting as a dummy pronoun, and the subject of the sentence. However, in a very similar sentence, it can act as an adverb, when it represents a specific place: John ...
Toby Speight's user avatar
  • 2,271
5 votes

Is this subject/verb agreement correct?

Using you with an attributive adjective (which is to say an adjective in front of it) is generally interpreted to create a third-person reference to the listener (or reader). The same goes for me. ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
5 votes

'Mice IS the scourge of the fields' <-- Plural noun - is/are - predicate noun

In general, the verb should match the subject. So, for example, "Mice are ...", not "Mice is ..." Even if, as in your examples, there is a predicate nominative that is singular. ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 68k
4 votes
Accepted

Theirs was not exactly a textbook friendship: What grammar construction is used here?

Mine is a different answer from Andrew's. This is not a literary construction at all, but something we could hear almost anywhere. The possessive pronoun simply anticipates its referent noun. ...
TimR's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Using one subject for two verbs

In English, two verbs that refer to the same grammatical subject are normally connected with "and", and the two example sentences in your question are correct. (I consider these sentences as ...
Tsundoku's user avatar
  • 1,866

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