26

It's perfectly grammatical. It's mainly an informal sentence pattern, and so it's true that it's usually avoided in formal style—but that's not because it's ungrammatical. Grammaticality and formality are two very different things. The basic pattern looks like this: (just) because + clause + does not mean + that-clause This is covered in The ...


14

Others have explained why you can't simply omit the "that". However, in this case it would be idiomatic to omit "that is", leaving "There is so much at stake for many."


14

Inside were mounds of gold coins The subject is "mounds of gold coins". The sentence exhibits what is called 'subject-dependent inversion'. Here the locational dependent "inside" has been inverted with the subject "mounds of gold coins". The basic order would be Mounds of gold coins were inside. Traditional grammar treats "inside" as adverb, but in ...


11

No, you really can't infer that. The we and you in we women and you men are correct; they are determiners, serving to specify WHICH women and men the speaker is talking about. In this case, the speaker could have said simply "Women are walking with their heads up, men will have to put their tails down", but using the determiners adds some punch and ...


11

As J.R. says, singular or plural deserve will work equally well. The bare sentence may be parsed as either: Only brave men deserve fair women. Only a brave man deserves a fair woman. There is, however, an overriding consideration. This line is a quotation from a poem by John Dryden, Alexander's Feast; or, the Power of Music. 'Twas at the royal ...


9

Generally, if you use a noun/pronoun in a compound sentence, you don't need to mention it again unless the noun in subject changes. I would call it grammatically correct to say: He read a book but didn't understand it. and He read a book and discussed it with his friends. Since there is a coordinating conjunction between the two sentences, leaving ...


9

The subject of the verb is 'the rest of the book'. We could say 'the rest of the book is about JavaScript in general, so it is applicable ...'. English sometimes drops some words if they are understood (or understandable) from the rest of the sentence. Maybe if this sentence was written for English language learners, the writer would have included the word '...


9

I thought that the subject is that which acts, and the object is that which is acted upon. This is often true in an active-voice sentence, but not in a passive-voice sentence. That which acts/is acted upon and subject/object really describe two different categories, not a single category. That which acts and that which is acted upon are semantic roles, ...


8

It is not clear as to how this accident happened. Your sentence sounds fine to my ear. :) As to your usage of "it", it seems as if "it" is probably being used as a dummy pronoun. A dummy pronoun has no semantic meaning, and is used purely for syntactic function. In your example, the dummy pronoun "it" is the grammatical subject....


8

Part 1 Subjects: Words, Phrases and Functions To make this section of the answer easier to think about, let's look at an even simpler example: There's a new president. The number one question here is: What is the subject of this sentence? This isn't as easy as it looks. If we want to answer this question we need to really understand what a subject is. ...


8

As the saying goes, a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. The writer of that piece of advice is badly informed. To start, let's just look at these two versions of a possible sentence. He is one of those men who is always on time. He is one of those men who are always on time. There are these two types of possible interpretation for the sentences: A: He ...


8

No, the relative pronoun that cannot be omitted in the sentence "There is so much (that) is at stake for many". This is because that functions as the subject of the defining relative clause that is at stake. When the relative pronoun is the subject of the relative clause it cannot be omitted. The same applies to the other relative pronouns. For example: ...


7

As Tyler James Young points out, the sentence is incomplete: there is a noun or NP missing at the end, something like: ... not important for the company's financial strength, or status, or balance sheet. Otherwise, yes: [How many cars the company has] is the subject of the sentence. It is, however, a singular subject, a quantity, not a plural one, so the ...


7

1. Basic Answer. The original author left out the subject, so you need to figure it out from context.1 As others noted, we can supply "a subject" by adding the word "it": "Although there is one chapter dedicated to the web browser environment, the rest of the book is about JavaScript in general, so it is applicable to all ...


7

These are called subject questions (as your first example) and object questions (as your second). Here we are talking about "do", so this is present simple and past simple tense. Let us take one example: Paul wants to speak to him. 1) If we want to know who "him" is, "him" is the object and the question we will ask is an object question. There will be an ...


7

The antecedent of which is not the noun concepts but the adjective related: ... in fact they are not related. ... in fact they are not [which] ↓ ← ← ← ← ← ← ← ← ↵ .... which in fact they are not


7

The subject of the sentence is: The "No" However, the complement of the preposition than is the noun phrase: her craving to be in Frisco's arms and forget this dreary existence. This has a co-ordination of clauses which appears as the complement of the noun craving. The coordination of clauses is: to be in Frisco's arms and forget this dreary existence....


7

Subjects in English generally come before the verb. The verb can have "other things" near it, words like have, can, should, was, etc. The subject can be things other than a noun, such as car, tree, or Bob. They can be words like "skiing" "going" or "eating." The basic sentence pattern in English is Subject + Verb + Object. The object is usually the ...


7

I think that this is confusing because you're using your and my when we already have a word our which would normally be preferred. For this reason the sentence is a little awkward, because it's not really clear why the writer has decided to not use our here. If you want to use your and my for emphasis, which you certainly could do, then it would be a good ...


7

The quoted sentence is an example of an inverted sentence. Unlike a standard sentence, which has the order [subject] [verb] [complement/nothing (depending on the verb)], it begins with the complement, the adverb Inside in this case, and ends with the subject, mounds of gold coins. This gives more emphasis to inside, and adds a bit more dramatic tension to ...


6

I think they accidentally left out a word: When it hatches, it has a broad face and a long flat tail. Source (What Your First Grader Needs to Know : Fundamentals of a Good First-Grade Education)


6

I don't think OP's example is an appropriate use of as to (which in such contexts can normally be directly replaced by regarding, concerning the matter of, in respect of, etc.). 1: It is not clear how this accident happened. 2: ?It is not clear as to how this accident happened. 3: ?There is uncertainty how this accident happened. 4: There is ...


6

Denis, look up this article: "Ditransitive Verb". A ditransitive verb can have two objects, one direct, one indirect. They are also called primary and secondary. In the sentence I gave Tom a cup. Cup is the direct object, and Tom, the indirect.


6

When the subject + verb of a subordinate clause like that is replaced with an -ing form, the subject of the subordinate clause is usually the same as a the subject of the main clause. So, After I studied for one year, I got 6.5 on the IELTS exam. After studying for one year, I got 6.5 on the IELTS exam. According to the Grammar Police, it is only possible ...


6

Neither is acceptable. The second part of the sentence is a clause and needs a subject (to go along with the "had" - the predicate). "Me" cannot be a subject, the subject would be "I": I'll tell you the truth, for I had the same story [that] you had. You can omit the 'for' with a slight change of meaning I'll tell you the truth, I had the same story ...


6

If you write It is necessary for job interviewees being punctual... The 'being punctual' is interpreted as a participle phrase modifying "interviewees". The tight binding of those parts of the sentence prevents the "being punctual" from making the intended connection to "necessary", like the "to be punctual" would if you wrote: It is necessary for ...


6

Consider the following sentences: What about the party didn't you like? Who from the film do you most want to meet? What about the story amused you? The news from Italy was the same. The results from the exams were published. That photograph of Mary doing a back-flip arrived. These sentences all start with noun phrases. These particular noun phrases all ...


6

The phenomenon presented in your question is called "Quantifier Floating". In English grammar, quantifier floating is the syntactic process by which a subject-related quantifier (all, both, or each) can be separated from the subject and appear in more than one location in a sentence. (directly copied from the link) This quantifier floating is possible not ...


5

The first two are examples of present perfect passive. The verbs are respectively "has been sent" and "have been registered". We do not know who did it, that is why we use the passive. Sent and registered are the past participles of the verbs send and register. The third sentence is an example of present perfect active, where the verb is "have been" (...


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