14 votes

Omitting 'that' in this sentence

Others have explained why you can't simply omit the "that". However, in this case it would be idiomatic to omit "that is", leaving "There is so much at stake for many."
user avatar
14 votes

What is the subject of the sentence "Inside were mounds of gold coins"?

Inside were mounds of gold coins The subject is "mounds of gold coins". The sentence exhibits what is called 'subject-dependent inversion'. Here the locational dependent "inside" has been inverted ...
user avatar
  • 13.3k
10 votes

...so is applicable to all environments - Where did the subject of the verb go?

The subject of the verb is 'the rest of the book'. We could say 'the rest of the book is about JavaScript in general, so it is applicable ...'. English sometimes drops some words if they are ...
user avatar
  • 7,396
8 votes
Accepted

What exactly is the word "there" in an existential construction? And related questions

Part 1 Subjects: Words, Phrases and Functions To make this section of the answer easier to think about, let's look at an even simpler example: There's a new president. The number one question ...
user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Can anyone explain to me the subject and object in this sentence?

As the saying goes, a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. The writer of that piece of advice is badly informed. To start, let's just look at these two versions of a possible sentence. He is one of ...
user avatar
8 votes

What is the subject in the sentence "Rice is being cooked by Mary"?

I thought that the subject is that which acts, and the object is that which is acted upon. This is often true in an active-voice sentence, but not in a passive-voice sentence. That which acts/is ...
user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Omitting 'that' in this sentence

No, the relative pronoun that cannot be omitted in the sentence "There is so much (that) is at stake for many". This is because that functions as the subject of the defining relative clause that is ...
user avatar
  • 2,885
7 votes
Accepted

...so is applicable to all environments - Where did the subject of the verb go?

1. Basic Answer. The original author left out the subject, so you need to figure it out from context.1 As others noted, we can supply "a subject" by adding the word "it": "...
user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

How do I use the auxiliary "do" in questions?

These are called subject questions (as your first example) and object questions (as your second). Here we are talking about "do", so this is present simple and past simple tense. Let us take one ...
user avatar
  • 2,780
7 votes

Dummy "it" and usage of "as to"

It is not clear as to how this accident happened. Your sentence sounds fine to my ear. :) As to your usage of "it", it seems as if "it" is probably being used as a dummy pronoun. ...
user avatar
  • 4,920
7 votes
Accepted

Which is the subject (and what's the other thing called)

Subjects in English generally come before the verb. The verb can have "other things" near it, words like have, can, should, was, etc. The subject can be things other than a noun, such as car, tree, ...
user avatar
7 votes

What is the subject of the sentence "Inside were mounds of gold coins"?

The quoted sentence is an example of an inverted sentence. Unlike a standard sentence, which has the order [subject] [verb] [complement/nothing (depending on the verb)], it begins with the complement,...
user avatar
  • 4,634
6 votes
Accepted

"This can make us think the concepts are related, which in fact they are not."

The antecedent of which is not the noun concepts but the adjective related: ... in fact they are not related. ... in fact they are not [which] ↓ ← ← ← ← ← ← ← ← ↵ ...
user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

How many subjects are there in this sentence?

The subject of the sentence is: The "No" However, the complement of the preposition than is the noun phrase: her craving to be in Frisco's arms and forget this dreary existence. This has a co-...
user avatar
6 votes

What is the subject in the introductory clause "After studying for 1 year. . ."?

When the subject + verb of a subordinate clause like that is replaced with an -ing form, the subject of the subordinate clause is usually the same as a the subject of the main clause. So, After I ...
user avatar
  • 1,527
6 votes

'It is necessary for job interviewees being punctual': Why isn't this grammatical?

If you write It is necessary for job interviewees being punctual... The 'being punctual' is interpreted as a participle phrase modifying "interviewees". The tight binding of those parts of the ...
user avatar
6 votes

'Yours and mine' or 'Your and my'?

I think that this is confusing because you're using your and my when we already have a word our which would normally be preferred. For this reason the sentence is a little awkward, because it's not ...
user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Why place "both" and "all" after an auxiliary verb such as "have"?

The phenomenon presented in your question is called "Quantifier Floating". In English grammar, quantifier floating is the syntactic process by which a subject-related quantifier (all, both, or each) ...
user avatar
6 votes

Forward or backward subject verb agreement

In each case you figure out what the verb is, then the subject. It's not the position of the verb relative to the subject that matters. In Using this rule enable(s) us to do X. the verb is clearly &...
user avatar
  • 6,539
6 votes
Accepted

Subject and Predicate in 'The cackling of geese saved Rome.'

English is quite strict about word order. In factual sentences (i.e. not questions or some other rarer forms) the subject must precede the verb. English has no way of marking nouns that are subjects ...
user avatar
  • 153k
6 votes

What is the function of "there" in the structure, "There is/are/..."?

There were fifteen cats and an eviction notice on Janet's front porch. This is an existential construction, where there is not an adverb but a dummy pronoun functioning as subject of the sentence. It'...
user avatar
  • 13.3k
5 votes

Dummy "it" and usage of "as to"

I don't think OP's example is an appropriate use of as to (which in such contexts can normally be directly replaced by regarding, concerning the matter of, in respect of, etc.). 1: It is not clear ...
user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Is there missing subject in 'a credit to whichever house becomes yours'?

I mean is it the way how English users say? Short answer: Yes, absolutely. "Whichever house becomes yours" is perfectly valid. In fact, the clause "whichever house that becomes yours" is very awkward,...
user avatar
  • 439
5 votes
Accepted

Object/subject question

Denis, look up this article: "Ditransitive Verb". A ditransitive verb can have two objects, one direct, one indirect. They are also called primary and secondary. In the sentence I gave Tom a cup. ...
user avatar
  • 36.2k
5 votes

"None is" or "none are"

First, let's just dispel the idea that none of them has any "fixed, correct" plurality... Note that it's much the same for us as it is for them, and any other animate/inanimate group whom/which we ...
user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Should I say "For/ to / me had the same story like you had" or just "Me had the same story"?

Neither is acceptable. The second part of the sentence is a clause and needs a subject (to go along with the "had" - the predicate). "Me" cannot be a subject, the subject would be "I": I'll tell ...
user avatar
5 votes

The subject of an interrogative sentence

Consider the following sentences: What about the party didn't you like? Who from the film do you most want to meet? What about the story amused you? The news from Italy was the same. The results from ...
user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

"Whether he met them (it) is not clear." Do I have to insert an ''it''?

We can use clauses as Subjects in English: [That she refused your offer] is not surprising. [Whether you like it] is not important. In the sentences above we see a declarative clause and an ...
user avatar
5 votes

How can I explain this "Who" question simply to my student?

Rules for making wh-questions. First locate the missing information: You taught ___? Select the correct wh-word and insert it into this space: You taught who? If, and only if, you ...
user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible