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You can use many conjunctions in a sentence; but you have to use them the right way. It's complicated, but here's a simplified explanation which handles the example you offer. At clause level there are two sorts of conjunctions, which establish different relationships between the clauses they join. a coordinating conjunction (Collins, so, 18-21 calls ...


27

Yes. To native ears, the two consecutive gerunds don’t sound especially remarkable even though they both end with -ing. The construction is fairly common: The contractor is delaying building the front porch. We’re risking missing our plane. I'm imagining writing a silly ending to this answer. Three gerunds in a row is unusual but tolerable: ...


26

Why we listen to music is a noun phrase. Why do we listen to music? is a well-formed question. Either could work as the title of an article, say, or a blog post. Titles are not required to be well-formed sentences, but they can be. The Cat in the Hat For Whom the Bell Tolls Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? I Saw What You Did


16

Heh, I think you answered your own question in your own question. It's wrong precisely because it's a response with an auxiliary verb, and therefore, we do not repeat the other verb in the short response. In other words, she should have said, "Yes, I will." See Yes/No Questions, Auxiliary Verbs And to predict your next question, no, she cannot say, "Yes, I'...


15

She is used to there being no one else around. *She is used to being no one else around. Both of these sentences involve the verb used plus a subordinate clause. The second sentence is probably a grammatical mistake. Let's look at how the sentences work. Here is a similar sentence: Maria is used to Tom being in Paris. In this sentence, Maria is ...


15

Why We Listen To Music=The Reason We Listen to Music versus: Why Do We Listen To Music? = A question. Titles of written texts (books or articles) can be quite complicated. In the examples above, one is in question form, a typical magazine style, and one is in statement form, which also happens to be a full sentence. That does not mean that all magazine-...


13

The basic (declarative) sentence is: He does not know. You can turn this into an interrogative clause with subject-auxiliary inversion. Just switch he and does: Does he not know? You can optionally replace does not with doesn't in the original sentence, using the suffix -n't rather than the word not: He doesn't know. Now the auxiliary is the ...


12

Considering setting up is perfectly grammatical, but (as you correctly sense) pairing the participle with the identically-formed gerund runs up against the horror aequi principle: hearers and readers don't like immediately consecutive uses of the same construction in different roles. (But it is entirely acceptable to repeat a construction in a parallel or ...


11

I know who I want to take home. You want to take someone home. And you know who that is. *I know who want to take me home. I know who wants to take me home. Someone wants to take you home. And you know who that is. I know who I want to take me home. You want to go home with someone. And you know who that is.


11

I don't think the answers sufficiently cover "What's the difference between "Why We Listen to Music" and "Why Do We Listen to Music"?". It's possible that it should simply be a separate question, but I'll explain the difference here anyway. The title of an article, in broad strokes, is an indication of what the content of that article is. An article titled "...


9

The rule is: Subordinate questions have no inversion of subject and verb as in independent questions. So the following examples are correct: What is it? (Subject placed after the verb) Do you know what it is? (In the subordinate question normal word order subject verb)


9

The answer your book doesn't want In English, as in many languages, nouns change form: rat   (singular) rats (plural) This is called inflection. In the example above, rat has two forms. These forms reflect grammatical number (singular and plural), so we can say nouns inflect for number. But some words inflect for other purposes. In English, for ...


9

Yes and no: it is meaningful, but you have to interpret it in a very specific way. The context is about the difference between -something you know (for example, a password) -something you have (for example, a key) -something you are (that is, you yourself!) The article starts by mentioning how we deal with how you prove something you know or something ...


9

I agree with the first part of stangdon's answer: The context is about the difference between something you know (for example, a password) something you have (for example, a key) I have a slightly different take on the "how you do you" part, though; I interpret that to mean that there is some kind of security mechanism based on how you ...


9

Options 1 and 2 are both correct. Both state that the teacher received a degree in the past and so is eligible to teach currently. Option 3 is incorrect because it is plural and "teacher" is singular. Option 4 is not grammatical -- it would have to be "has been doing." It's worth noting that, in written English, to receive a degree would be preferable to do ...


8

CocoPop's answer was pretty good, but for a more formal answer: A conjunction joins two sentences. In Chinese, from what I understand, the conjunction used here has two parts, but is one conjunction - the two parts must be used together. The English conjunctions "because" and "so" are not two parts of one thing; each one is its own conjunction. SO when you ...


8

VERBS OF PERCEPTION can take a clause with the verb in the infinitive or plain form. Verbs of perception are verbs about how our bodies detect things in the world. Some examples are: hear, listen, see, watch, look, taste, feel, sense If these clauses take a verb in the plain form, then the pronoun before the verb will always be accusative (an 'object' ...


8

*The medicine is easy [ to be taken ]. -- (ungrammatical) The medicine is ready [ to be taken ]. SHORT ANSWER: The reason why the OP's example #1 is ungrammatical and example #2 is grammatical is because the adjective "easy" and the adjective "ready" are in two different subclasses of adjectives. That is: The subclass of adjectives that "easy" is a ...


8

They're both correct. Use whichever sentence communicates the meaning you have in mind. I called to ask Mary for help. You called someone—probably Mary, but perhaps not. Why did you call? To ask Mary for her help. I called Mary to ask for help. You called Mary specifically. Why did you call? To ask someone (probably Mary) for help. Both ...


8

Your thinking is right up until step 4. The usual principle is that the case of a relative pronoun reflects its role in the subordinate clause, not the main clause. Of course, since that has the same form whether it's nominative or accusative, it's something of a moot point. However, you can see the principle at work in the fading but not yet completely ...


7

VERBS OF PERCEPTION are verbs that explain how we use our bodies to know about the world. They explain how we use our "five senses". These are our senses of: touch, taste, sight, hearing and smell Example verbs are: hear, listen, see, watch, look, taste, feel, sense They also include some mental processes we have when we sense things. For example: ...


7

Sentences can consist of multiple clauses and thus contain multiple verbs. And is a coordinator (also called a coordinating conjunction). One of the functions of that is as a subordinator (also called a subordinating conjunction) - and an important characteristic of that is that it can usually be omitted. It is understood no complaint has been ...


7

@Ringo gives a good explanation of the correct answer to the test question, so I won't repeat that. I think the question is flawed because, (a) there appear to be two right answers. Choices 1 and 2 are both valid. And (b) "did an MA" is very informal. As Ringo says, it should be "received an MA" or in this case I would prefer "earned an MA". As to your ...


6

At first glance, it seems to throw off the cause-and-effect balance of the sentence by introducing a redundancy that is difficult for the (native) listener to parse. Also, it makes it hard to justify the otherwise elegant "tent" contour of a true cause and effect statement: /because it's raining/ \I'll take the umbrella\ -or- /it's ...


6

Some answers have already been given to this question, I will try to phrase it differently, I hope that helps. Gordon was about to walk away from the Impala when he saw it stop and (saw) his son get out. This sentence is correct. As already mentioned, the past tense is "saw". The man saw something. What did he see? Two things: 1) He saw the car stop. ...


6

I was surprised to learn that both sentences would look acceptable in a newspaper headline (thanks to Snailboat's comment below), so I remodeled my answer a little: Man dies after being hit by truck. The word "being" helps create the Passive Voice: A truck hit a man. (active voice) -> Man dies after truck hits him. (A newspaper headline) A man ...


6

When the subject + verb of a subordinate clause like that is replaced with an -ing form, the subject of the subordinate clause is usually the same as a the subject of the main clause. So, After I studied for one year, I got 6.5 on the IELTS exam. After studying for one year, I got 6.5 on the IELTS exam. According to the Grammar Police, it is only ...


6

The leaders of the world, meeting at the UN in New York, agreed a new set of Global Goals for the development of the world to 2030. The phrase meeting in at the UN in New York is a verb phrase which tells us about the noun phrase the leaders of the world. It is an Adjunct and provides extra information. It part of the main clause. We have to use an -ing ...


5

You may not strike them, since that would leave your if clause incoherent. Here's your structure (I've rewritten a little to make your phrases idiomatic): [MAIN CLAUSE :   [SUBJECT Extraction of the outline] :   [PREDICATE :   :   [VERB becomes] :   :   [COMPLEMENT very difficult] :   ] ]    [SUBORDINATE CLAUSE    :   [SUBORDINATOR If]  ...


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