Skip to main content
25 votes

Grammar of titles - wh-clause vs. question

Why we listen to music is a noun phrase. Why do we listen to music? is a well-formed question. Either could work as the title of an article, say, or a blog post. Titles are not required to be well-...
TimR's user avatar
  • 129k
18 votes
Accepted

Why is "I'll be", wrong as a short answer?

Heh, I think you answered your own question in your own question. It's wrong precisely because it's a response with an auxiliary verb, and therefore, we do not repeat the other verb in the short ...
Teacher KSHuang's user avatar
17 votes

It seems the main clause is absent in this complex sentence. Why is it correct?

The main clause is the one headed by the verb "is", so the bracketing is: (What surprises me) is (that they are fond of snakes and lizards). Both the subject and its complement are content ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
14 votes

Grammar of titles - wh-clause vs. question

Why We Listen To Music=The Reason We Listen to Music versus: Why Do We Listen To Music? = A question. Titles of written texts (books or articles) can be quite complicated. In the examples above, ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.5k
12 votes

"He asked me to use my bathroom."

He asked me to use my bathroom. That is poor wording, because as you said, it sounds like he's asking you to do it yourself. In context, we would probably know what you meant, but we wouldn't say it ...
rjpond's user avatar
  • 23.1k
11 votes

Grammar of titles - wh-clause vs. question

I don't think the answers sufficiently cover "What's the difference between "Why We Listen to Music" and "Why Do We Listen to Music"?". It's possible that it should simply be a separate question, but ...
Kamil Drakari's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

Is "how you do you" grammatical?

Yes and no: it is meaningful, but you have to interpret it in a very specific way. The context is about the difference between -something you know (for example, a password) -something you have (for ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.9k
9 votes

Subordinate clause not equivalent to main clause

Options 1 and 2 are both correct. Both state that the teacher received a degree in the past and so is eligible to teach currently. Option 3 is incorrect because it is plural and "teacher" is singular. ...
Ringo's user avatar
  • 7,738
8 votes

Is "how you do you" grammatical?

I agree with the first part of stangdon's answer: The context is about the difference between something you know (for example, a password) something you have (for example, a key) ...
J.R.'s user avatar
  • 110k
8 votes
Accepted

It seems the main clause is absent in this complex sentence. Why is it correct?

[What surprises me] is that they are fond of snakes and lizards. The main clause is the whole sentence in a 'fused' relative construction. The subject "what surprises me", is not a clause ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
7 votes
Accepted

what is the meaning of this sentence and what is the verbs?

Sentences can consist of multiple clauses and thus contain multiple verbs. And is a coordinator (also called a coordinating conjunction). One of the functions of that is as a subordinator (also ...
rjpond's user avatar
  • 23.1k
7 votes

Subordinate clause not equivalent to main clause

@Ringo gives a good explanation of the correct answer to the test question, so I won't repeat that. I think the question is flawed because, (a) there appear to be two right answers. Choices 1 and 2 ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 67.3k
6 votes

I am happy I could/was able to help you. - which one?

'Could' is used to indicate possibility. 'Able' is related to ability. Arguably "I'm glad I could help you" could refer to things that made it possible for you to help - the circumstances, ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k
5 votes
Accepted

Weird that-clause from GRE

I had to parse that monster of a sentence a few times before I understood it. Presumably there should have been a comma after “notice”. The results of Nylenna’s study were not anomalous because they ...
smatterer's user avatar
  • 1,856
5 votes

Marking the functions of a sentence: 'She may like it'

She may [ like it ]. Traditionally "may like" has been taken as a constituent (and commonly called 'the verb’). There was a lot of argument about this in the 70s, and many have come round to the view ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
5 votes
Accepted

Are they two subordinate clauses?

If you’ve [made a change [that you feel [would [benefit the community …]]]] I’ve bracketed the subordinate clauses. There are four in all. The understood subject of "made" is "you", and of "would" ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
5 votes

I pray every day / I hope... + ... doesn't / will not

Those all sound completely natural to me, a native speaker. "Pray" sounds more emphatic than "hope", and does not / will not are interchangeable here.
Valkor's user avatar
  • 714
5 votes

"He asked me to use my bathroom."

The first sentence would certainly be understood in context, but it could be improved by leaving out "me." The verb "ask" can be intransitive: "I asked to use the bathroom.&...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 14.2k
5 votes

Some Questions About Sentence Clauses

[1] Andrew decided [to buy a sundae instead of a double-scoop cone]. [2] Peter and Elaine could not decide [if they wanted to elope or have a big wedding]. [3] The beach is a lot of fun, [yet the ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
5 votes

'I was eating when he came home' vs 'He came home when I was eating'

In English, the first word/words of the sentence usually have more emphasis than later words. People pay the most attention to the beginning of each sentence and less to the end. This is because ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Confusion regarding Simple, Complex and Compound sentences

The traditional definitions of simple, compound and complex sentences: A simple sentence has a single independent clause and no dependent (subordinate) clauses. A compound sentence has two or more ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
4 votes

Is it possible to write a complex sentence without a dependent clause and without conjunctions?

These are not (as you observe) "complex sentences" in the sense in which the term was traditionally taught; they are merely "complicated" in various ways. But the term "complex sentence", however you ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Can a sentence be the subject?

The painter selects which color to use. Which color to use is selected by the painter. The chef decides how to cook the food. How to cook the food is decided by the chef. The traffic cop decides ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 129k
4 votes
Accepted

Please don't forget to ring me when you get home

Why is this correct? You ask why the first example is "correct", and why the second is "incorrect", and there are several things to consider in the question. In maths, we can say with certainty that ...
P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

"to first receive" or "to receive first"

Adverbial first is like many other common terms (just, only, etc.) in that we can often be a bit loose as regards exact positioning relative to the specific word (noun or verb) it applies to. Who's ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Is the sentence 'What I need is to do/doing the things I like.' grammatically correct?

In the pattern What I need is... + {some needed action} [rather than some needed thing] the complement will be an infinitive clause necessarily headed by "to", and the verb will express the idea of ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 129k
4 votes
Accepted

Marking the functions of a sentence: 'She may like it'

A CaGEL analysis would be like this: She [C] may [P] like it [C] Or to make it clearer: She [C] may [P] like it [C] Of course, the last Complement, like it, is itself a clause with its own ...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
4 votes

Are "getting p.p" and "have been p.p" same?

'Getting [x]' often describes the process of something happening. For example, "I'm wet" describes your current condition, whereas "I'm getting wet" describes what is currently ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k
4 votes

How shall "...with his denial that we have any grasp of the way the world is independent of the way our minds construct our experience" be parsed?

The prepositional with can introduce something that rubs shoulders with something else, which is temporally right next to it, so to speak: And with that remark, he left the room. And that notion of ...
TimR on some device's user avatar
3 votes

what is the difference between " when it rains" and "when it is going to rain"

I will buy an umbrella when it rains. The next time it rains, I will buy an umbrella. Or possibly the time after that. I will buy an umbrella when it is going to rain. The next time it looks ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.4k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible