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Tense depends on the time of the action of the verb, NOT on whether the subject is specific or non-specific. Subject : You (specific) : Zero conditional : If you have an unhappy childhood, you are more protective of your kids. Conditional type 1 : If you have an unhappy childhood, you will be more protective of your kids. Conditional type 2 : ...


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There are a few things that need to be mentioned here. First of all, the tense doesn't depend on whether you're referring to a specific person/entity or a "non-specific" person/entity. The only difference is that the verb would inflect (i.e. "you eat" would become "he eats"). For example: If I turn on the lights, I will waste electricity. If you ...


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"How" is a flat adverb (an adverb that has no -ly ending), and "how" is also an interrogative adverb (an adverb that is used to ask a direct question or an indirect question).{How are you doing?} Interrogative adverbs can also "modify some word or phrase in the sentence" in which they appear and "they often present a question about manner" {How did the ...


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From Merriam-Webster's definition of contrary: on the contrary : just the opposite // The test will not be easy; on the contrary, it will be extremely difficult. What the phrase does is contradict a claim within the previous clause: The test will not be easy.→ The test will be just the opposite of easy. The phrase doesn't contradict the entire ...


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I agree with you: it doesn't seem like the best fit here. That's because I also interpreted 'on the contrary' to contrast the entire previous sentence, but I think it's only intended to contrast '(not) trustworthy'. However, it is correct. Perhaps it's not the best structure by the author. I would propose: The man wasn't very trustworthy. In fact, he had ...


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Yes they are. So and that, when used to mean "in order that", are interchangeable, as seen in this example from Ngram: let us die that we may live. (original) let us die so we may live. let us die so that we may live. See also this poem. ...aplaud so we may evolve lizard to angel (original) ...applaud that we may evolve lizard to angel ...


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The idea of replacing ", which" with ", and it" is not strict equivalence, but a a general similar meaning. The intention is to demonstrate to the student how a non-restrictive clause adds additional information. This additional information could often be added in a co-ordinated clause or even in a separate sentence. So the first example "This book is ...


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The sentence *I know the method how he did it. might seem analogous to "I know the person who did it." In the latter sentence, the word "who" is a relative pronoun, with antecedent "person". But the word "how" is not a relative pronoun. It has definitions as an adverb and as a conjunction: American Heritage Dictionary "how" You may note also that the ...


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It sounds strange since its kind of mashing up two ways to say the same thing. Its OK to say I know how he did it And also I know the method he used But you can't put them together like that. A "method" is something that is used, followed, etc. But a method isn't something you "do." And appending "how" after a noun is going to sound wrong in any ...


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