32 votes

What does "Honeykins" mean?

The word "honeykins" uses two suffixes to make it more endearing: "-kin" and "-s". -kin is an English suffix that was used in the olden days to form diminutive forms of nouns. There are still several ...
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  • 36.2k
25 votes
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Why is there a 'p' in "assumption" but not in "assume"?

Assumption is directly derived from Latin assumptionem which does have a P, so it also has a P. Assume on the other hand is derived from Latin assumere, which didn't have a P. Other similar examples ...
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  • 17.7k
25 votes
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Is "drawable" a correct word?

English is fairly flexible and open to the creation of 'new' words and compound words from familiar prefixes and suffixes, "-able" being one such example. A Google search finds quite a lot ...
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  • 75k
22 votes
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Is "triggerer" correct, or is there some other word to identify the person who triggered something?

"Triggerer" has been a word for the past 60 years or so, according to Google nGrams. To my native English speaking ear, it sounds like a perfectly natural construction, but slightly awkward-...
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18 votes
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What does the same-ish mean?

Adding an '-ish' at the end of a word is generally done in informal contexts, mostly to make the reference sound deliberately vague and approximate. (Source) Here, the speaker has added the suffix ...
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  • 8,160
17 votes

Why is there a 'p' in "assumption" but not in "assume"?

Void's answer give the immediate explanation: English does it because Latin does it. Edit - and now also explains the phonetic reason. But there is a more general answer behind this. It's a phenomenon ...
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  • 65.2k
15 votes
Accepted

Is adjective "backuped" correct?

The phrasal verb "back up" has been combined to make a noun "backup" or "backups". But the verb form still has its suffixes after "back", not after "up". The servers should be "backed up", not "...
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  • 23.8k
15 votes

Is "drawable" a correct word?

Yes, 'drawable' is a correct and legitimate word I don't understand why you can't use drawable to mean 'something that can be drawn'. Perhaps it's just its unlookupability (or unlookupable-ness) or ...
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  • 17.7k
13 votes

Is "triggerer" correct, or is there some other word to identify the person who triggered something?

Trigger As others have pointed out, a trigger is something that triggers an action. You do not need an extra "-er". It sounds stupid (IMHO) Note: The title and question are inconsistent. In ...
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10 votes

Why do we say "a one-legged man", with a final -ed, but also say "a one-person job" without?

The past participle formed from a part of the body(eye, arm, leg, foot, etc) means "having said body part", as you say; a number in front indicates how many there are: a three-legged stool a ...
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10 votes

Is "envisageable" a legitimate English adjective?

Of course, you can. There are loads of verbs in English that can be adjectivised. When I saw the word envisageable in your question, it didn't strike me as strange. We append the suffix -able to verbs ...
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  • 17.7k
10 votes
Accepted

Pronunciation rules for "CH" and "arch-"

There are no consistent rules for the pronunciation of the digraph ⟨ch⟩; it can be pronounced either /k/ or /t͡ʃ/, depending on the origin of the word. There are some general guidelines, but they too ...
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  • 17.7k
9 votes

Is "triggerer" correct, or is there some other word to identify the person who triggered something?

The question is whether you're talking about literal triggers (i.e. the lever on a gun or gun-shaped tool) or figurative ones. I'll skip you some time on the longer figurative answer and address ...
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  • 1,398
8 votes
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The "-cal" suffix

There is no -cal suffix. There are some words with an -ic suffix and others with -ical. Usually they mean the same thing. From the OED: -ic, suffix. Forms: (formerly -ick, ik(e, -ique), ...
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  • 22.5k
8 votes
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About the word "agitate"

You are making the "etymological fallacy". You are breaking down a word into its roots and supposing that you can derive its meaning from that. There is a Proto Indoeuropean root "*ag-&...
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  • 153k
5 votes

Rules for pronouncing prefixes and suffixes

NOTE: This is off the top of my head; there may be aspects of this I've overlooked, so I would welcome any correction anybody wants to supply. You're missing a simpler way of understanding this, ...
5 votes
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What does the suffix '-fare' mean?

While these three words all end in -fare, they actually all differ in their construction. Warfare is the only one which uses -fare as a suffix. The -fare suffix comes from the Middle English fare, ...
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5 votes

Is "triggerer" correct, or is there some other word to identify the person who triggered something?

I don't see anything wrong with triggerer. The suffix -er is a highly productive suffix in Modern English and can be appended to an enormous number of verbs (and nouns/adjectives particularly when ...
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  • 17.7k
5 votes

Is "triggerer" correct, or is there some other word to identify the person who triggered something?

As the word feels awkward (as many people have already pointed out) I would suggest a synonym: instead of the process being triggered by a triggerer, it should be initiated by an initiator or ...
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4 votes
Accepted

Words that differ only in the suffices -cal vs -able

This source gives us a pretty small list of candidates that also have an -cal form: medicable vocable (I revised the query to have just -cable) One might add "amicable", as I think I've seen "amical"...
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  • 3,354
4 votes

Is the word 'restrictionable' correct?

We can freely make new adjectives from verbs using the suffix -able. It does not matter at all whether these words have ever been used before. It does not matter if these words are in the dictionary ...
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4 votes

Looking for the name of this type of grammatical term "im-", "mis-"

The different parts of words that have different meanings are called MORPHEMES. A morpheme is the smallest part of a word that has its own meaning. So the morphemes in the word reviewed are: re (...
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4 votes

What does "Honeykins" mean?

It is an alternative way of saying honey or darling. The addition of kins makes honey sound even more loving. For instance, cutie and cutie pie function the same way. In the Urdu language, we add ...
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  • 132
4 votes
Accepted

Is it appropriate to use ish-suffix with languages? (ex. Englishish)

As long as you recognize that it's pretty informal English, sure. You can add -ish, -y or -esque to some words to give it the sense of "almost but not quite". There are some minor differences between ...
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  • 25.2k
4 votes

The "-cal" suffix

First, you are correct in assuming that -ical means a matter of or belonging to. All definitions you suggested are more or less correct; it simply means related to the field of, for example ...
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  • 132
4 votes

What is the suffix of "feature"?

English words ending with an apparent suffix -ure, from Latin -ura, fall into two great classes: 1) those taken from Latin, directly or through French, where the suffix was present in one or both ...
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  • 548
4 votes
Accepted

Biometric vs Biometrical

The use of -ic and -al appears to be a classic case of how the English language's habit of adopting features from other languages can cause confusion: for expert speakers almost as much as learners. ...
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  • 5,514
4 votes

What is the agent noun for verbs ending in -y?

The normal rule is: If you add "-er" to a word that ends in "y", then if the letter before the "y" is a consonant, change the "y" to an "i" before ...
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  • 57.6k
3 votes
Accepted

Can I place suffixes and prefixes whenever it seems correct?

You didn't mention specific examples of words you have formed, so I can only answer generically. The answer is, yes and no. Yes, because English has no formal governing body that dictates what is ...
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  • 7,993
3 votes

Is the word 'restrictionable' correct?

-Able/-ible goes on the ends of verbs, not nouns. Many words in English work as both verbs and nouns. However, if the -ion suffix on a word was used to turn a word into a noun, awkwardness can ...
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  • 35.9k

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