211

Well, the opposite of low isn't up but high, which has the comparative higher and the superlative highest. So they're equivalent in that regard. The opposite of up would be down. But up and down when used to describe relative directions are adverbs, not adjectives, and they don't have direct comparative and superlative forms (unlike say, badly, worse, and ...


43

Rightmost would fit here. Incidentally, leftmost for left. Not quite one word, but you could use 'farthest to the right' or 'farthest to the left' as the case may be. FUN FACT: When you use 'Right' as in correct, the superlative form becomes 'Most right'. English, right?!


36

It does not mean the same thing. Most can be used as a superlative, but it can also be used to indicate that something or someone possesses a property very much instead of the most. By calling him the most talented writer, the author would exclude the possibility of any other writer being better. That is quite an impossible claim to maintain and will ...


35

The word you're looking for is uppermost or upmost: adjective Highest in place, rank, or importance. adverb At or to the highest or most important position. Oxford Dictionaries There are a number of words like this that end in "-most" such as: uttermost/utmost (from "utter", which itself is from "out"), innermost, outermost, and lowermost (...


26

No, it is not a correct English word. Apparently Merriam-Webster includes an adjective definition for 'horror', but I have to disagree with them here. The example usage is 'horror movie', which you've also included in your question. However, 'horror movie' is a compound noun, and in that phrase, 'horror' is acting as a noun adjunct, not an adjective. A noun ...


23

Both are somewhat correct, but it's better to use simplest. This is called the superlative in grammar. It can be used by either adding the word "most" before the adjective, or by modifying the adjective with the suffix "-est". If you care about the rules, here is a quote from oxforddictionaries.com: The superlative is formed in different ways according to ...


23

most as an adverb has two different meanings: 1: to the greatest or highest degree —often used with an adjective or adverb to form the superlative (the most challenging job he ever had) 2: to a very great degree (was most persuasive) Here, the meaning is the second definition. If it were the first definition, the definite article would be required: the ...


20

Horror is not an adjective. It is a noun. In the sentence "I saw a horror movie yesterday", it seems like an adjective, since it modifies "movie", but that's not what's actually happens. "Horror movie" is a compound noun. "Horror" can also be a noun by itself Hey, could you recommend some good horror for me? You could also substitute another movie genre ...


20

"Least of all" is an idiom used with a negative statement meaning, of all those that we have just mentioned, this one meets the condition less than any of the others. i.e. the condition is negative, so this one is the most important or significant. "We can't afford to lose any member of this team, least of all Smith." We can't afford to lose any member of ...


17

The Most Rude, ill-Mannered, and Humiliating Plays in NBA History! If we use rudest here, we would have to still use "most" for the other adjectives: The Rudest, Most ill-Mannered, and Most Humiliating Plays in NBA History! The title uses "most" to apply to all three adjectives, because "ill-Manneredest" is a word I've never seen nor would wish to see ...


16

Consider excellent very good of its kind, eminently good or outstanding. extremely good or excellent note that these words start with vowels, so the 'a' turns into 'an'


15

Strictly speaking there's nothing wrong grammatically with this. What is unusual about it, and what makes it grate slightly to (at least this) native speaker, is that there is a clash of styles: "got" in this context is slightly informal (though entirely normal in conversation), whereas "most tired" is rather formal/old fashioned. Either would be fine alone,...


15

As was pointed out, "up" and "low" are not direct antonyms. The antonymn of "up" is "down". Neither of these have a comparative or superlative form. Note that "downer" and "upper" are existing words, but are not listed as a comparative form. The antonym of "low" is "high". Both of these have a comparative (lower/higher) and superlative (lowest/highest). ...


14

This is the best car in the garage. We use articles like the and a before nouns, like car. The word "best" is an adjective, and adjectives do not take articles by themselves. Because the noun car is modified by the superlative adjective best, and because this makes the noun car definite in this context, we use the. It is best not to do something. ...


13

The noun superlative The the is there, two words ahead of the superlative adjective. Usually in English the adjective comes ahead of the noun, but in this sentence it comes after the noun. The is not so flexible,* so it still precedes the noun. You could also write it like this: (1) I could not face being alone again and losing the dearest person to me. ...


13

Hrm, just a few observations on some of the answers here, from an American English speaker: Many English versions of the word you're looking for were historically used to refer to things that are large in size, and can sometimes cause confusion on whether it's exceptionally good, or exceptionally large. In context the difference is often clear, but when ...


12

Most monosyllabic (1-syllable) adjectives seem to use -er/-est to form superlatives. Most trisyllabic (3 syllables) or longer adjectives seem to use the "more/most" construction. According to various grammar sites, there's no clear rule for bisyllabic adjectives, with some suggesting checking the dictionary to see if -er and -est forms are listed immediately ...


11

While toppest is certainly not a word in any standard dictionary, it's always possible for individuals to make up words for fun. A good example of this is embiggen and cromulent, both created for use in the popular animated TV series "The Simpsons". A noble spirit embiggens the smallest man! Mrs. Krabappel: "Embiggens"? Hm. Never heard that word ...


10

They buy the stuff they need where it is cheapest, at least in the majority of cases. Apples in this store are cheapest. The adjectives used in these sentences are predicative adjectives, and it is okay to omit the before them. They are "part of the predicate", they follow the verb is/are. The use of the before a predicative superlative adjective is ...


10

@dbb and @laurel have explained things perfectly, I only wish to complement and expand on their excellent answers. Upper belongs to a category of English comparatives that are either losing or have lost their comparative meaning and are mainly used as positive. Excluding old and elder, the next six examples also have more than one superlative. upper (...


9

Thousands of people rallied in other U.S. cities, most peacefully, and President Barack Obama appealed for calm and understanding, pleading with both protesters and police to show restraint. I agree that the meaning here is Most of the people who rallied did so in a peaceful manner. One might try to read it as All the people mentioned, thousands ...


9

'Least of all on Kojeve' just means that he best understood the irony.'Least of all' paired with 'lost on no one' is a double negative, so another way of looking at the sentence could be 'Everyone understood the irony, and Kojeve understood it the most of all'.


8

You may consider Exceptional From the online dictionary, definition 2: unusually excellent; superior: an exceptional violinist.


7

The antecedent is people at the school, although it's plural and Harry is singular, so the deleted portion we must recover is person at the school: From being one of the most popular and admired people at the school, Harry was suddenly the most hated person at the school.


7

Before a singular count noun modified by 'most' plus an adjective you need a determiner, and this can include either the definite article or indefinite article. So technically, one could say both She is the most beautiful girl. and She is a most beautiful girl. For the difference in usage, see a most talented writer -- grammar -- why not "the most ...


7

Absolutely not. dumbest is a superlative. As you say, a superlative requires the not a in front of it. Plus, you can't use a superlative with like. There is no point in comparing a superlative with anything: it is the whatever-est. For the sake of gender equality, I have replaced girl with guy in my examples :-) It may well be mis-heard report of this ...


7

It's fine with or without the. Some questions, like this one, seem more natural to me with the, and others without, but I'm not entirely sure why.


6

Yes, it's grammatical. The use of superlative adjectives is not confined to the structure you describe.


6

The more common form would be The best of the best. Where the second best denotes the collection of best [items], the first best denotes the best one in that collection. I would not dare to claim that "the best out of the bests" is incorrect, but I would assume it is localized Indian English. If we accept it as correct, "best" is a noun, denoting ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible