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4 votes

usage of 'having been + past participle'

Is it okay to use 'Having been+third form' as the reduction of Passive Relative Clause in Simple Past Tense in order to put more emphasis? In a word, no—because BE having been VERBPaPpl is not ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
2 votes

How can I translate the supplementive phrase?

There is a very subtle difference in meaning. John, who knew that his wife was expecting a baby, started to take a course on baby care. He knew about the baby, but maybe that's unrelated: perhaps he ...
equin0x80's user avatar
  • 967
1 vote
Accepted

participle to qualify noun and pronoun

You understand qualify correctly—modify is the more usual term—but your "rule" needs some adjustment. Hearing and taking do not modify the noun boy. (I will say more about what they do ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
1 vote

What kind of participle clause is applied in the following examples?

"Going back to" and "Speaking of" are both conversation segues that are introductory in your examples. Very many set phrases, words and idioms are used as segues in speech. They can be comparing ...
SovereignSun's user avatar
  • 25.1k
1 vote
Accepted

How can I translate the supplementive phrase?

Yes, your sentences are correct. The second versions include relative clauses, while the first versions include present participle phrases that are sometimes called "reduced relative clauses"...
MarcInManhattan's user avatar
1 vote

time away from him and all that - supplement? Meaning and analysis?

"That I was busy with my career? It didn’t seem to matter that I was doing it for our family. My efforts to connect with Rosalind not only failed but angered Archie, [due to] time away from him ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.5k
1 vote
Accepted

an influence + supplementary information accompanying a noun..."influence IN the formation of my character..."

"In" doesn't fit the context of "the formation of my character". You would use "in" or "on" depending on how you would speak about the subject in any other context. For example, you would say a ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k

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