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42

I believe the symbol is known as a tilde https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tilde The Punctuation Guide is a good source of information for English punctuation and its usage, including what each symbol is called (though in this case it doesn't mention the tilde). Typing the actual symbol into Google or Wikipedia also yields an accurate result. [edit] If ...


38

Your indicated keys, plus the three above and to the right of your indicated keys and the shifted version of the top row all generate "punctuation" characters. Keyboard keys are generally referred to by the default character they represent (rather than any shifted alternatives). The ones you've specifically marked are... ; is the Semi-Colon Key ' is the ...


28

The single tick following a variable is often (but not always) used to represent a derivative and (in the United States) is always pronounced "prime." In your example, "Ex prime = ex plus tee." f(x) = x² <--- "Eff of ex equals ex squared." f′(x) = 2 x <---- "Eff prime of ex equals two ex." f′′(x) = 2 <---- "Eff ...


16

These keys generally go by the name of their unshifted character (i.e., the character on the bottom of the key). This is true of most of the keyboard: for example, we generally call the key with 1 and ! the "1 key" not the "exclamation point key". Of course, if you actually want someone to type an exclamation point, you'd tell them, "Type an exclamation ...


14

The precise name of a symbol in mathematics sometimes depends on what you're using it for. For example, × is often referred to simply as the multiplication sign, but if you need to distinguish scalar from vector multiplication, you might refer to it more specifically as the cross multiplication sign, vector multiplication sign, or something similar. In ...


11

Formally, The derivative of... In full: Y equals the sine of f-of-x, implies that the derivative of y equals cos f-of-x times the derivative of f of x. Informally, and depending on dialect, you can say either 'prime' (as per Humbulani's answer) or 'dash' - f prime of x, y-dash etc. The former is predominant in (but is not restricted to) the US, while the ...


11

f′(x) is read f prime of x, or the derivative of f of x, or the derivative of f with respect to x. f″(x) is read f double prime of x, or the second derivative of f of x, or the second derivative of f with respect to x. ẋ is read x dot, or the derivative of x with respect to time, or the time derivative of x. If x is a distance, ẋ can ...


9

~ - this is called Tilde. " and ' - these are called Double and Single Quotes, respectively. : and ; - these are called full and semi colon, respectively. ? - this is called the Question Mark. / - this is called the slash. < and > are called brackets (at times), but are mostly referred to as less-than and greater-than signs.


9

It depends on context. For scalar values (all "normal" numbers that we know and love are scalar), all of those operators are the same, and are called multiplication, and the operator is called the multiplication operator, or much less frequently as the times operator. When reading the equation "3 x 2" out loud, natives would typically use the following ...


7

The formal name for ~ is tilde. Many programmers call it twiddle. A slash or forward slash is /. If north is at the top of the page, it points southwest-to-northeast. It is tilted the same way that most right-handed people slant their writing, so it has a "forward" slant. Standard American keyboards have ? as Shift-/. A whack or backslash is \. If ...


6

In my experience, in the specific case where it indicates a derivative, it is pronounced "dash". Odd, I know, as it does not look anything like a dash "-". In all other circumstances, "prime". Found this nice general reference on mathematical and scientific symbols pronunciation that may be useful.


5

Technically, it's the multiplication sign, ×, not x. It indicates a hybrid name, one that indicates the plant or animal is a hybrid. The Wikipedia entry begins by saying Peppermint (Mentha × piperita, also known as Mentha. balsamea Willd.) is a hybrid mint: a cross between watermint and spearmint. so the scientific name is saying "this kind of Mentha ...


5

Names for these keys in what context? If you are telling someone to enter a certain character into the computer, you tell him the character. Like, "type a colon" or "press the colon key". The fact that there is different symbol generated by the shifted or unshifted version of this key is usually irrelevant. Especially considering that there are different ...


3

The one term I haven't seen mentioned yet is that the keys that do NOT carry a digit or an alphabet character and that are also NOT Function keys (the F1-F12 keys, on some keyboards they go up to F20) are, as a group, often called the Symbol keys. For example, from this Apple help page: Some keys repeat when you hold them down, depending on where you type ...


3

Here is a list of symbols with names: http://www.computerhope.com/keys.htm Note some of the symbols have several names # : Number sign, Hash, Sharp, Pound ! : Exclamation Mark, Bang { : Curly bracket, Open brace ~ : Tilde ` : Back quote, Acute, Backtick \ : Backslash


3

Can we say press the key which contains two punctuation marks: double quotes and full colon? This is a bad idea, because the keyboard layout in different countries is different. For example on my UK English keyboard, the locations of @ and " are swapped over compared with your picture (@ is above ' and " is above 2 on the top row). In fact, every row of ...


2

It's the hand sign for the number four: It's not clear from the video what the relevance is, though. A popular chant in support of a President is "four more years", though that doesn't make a lot of sense in the context of Donald Trump's recent election.


2

To do something "avidly" means that you do it enthusiastically, you do it more thoroughly than you might otherwise because you enjoy it or have a great interest in it. To "avidly read the news" would mean you read through an entire newspaper (or news web site or whatever), or read news from many sources, and that you do this because you want to and not ...


2

That's a hyphen. They notify the reader that two or more elements in a sentence are linked. Rule 1. Generally, hyphenate two or more words when they come before a noun they modify and act as a single idea. This is called a compound adjective. Examples: an off-campus apartment state-of-the-art design When a compound adjective follows a noun, a ...


2

In High School and Junior High in Japan, we read a′ as "a dash." However, in universities, it is occasionally read as "a prime" due to American influence. The Oxford English Dictionary (1969) states that it is "usually read as 'a dash' in the explanation of the word 'prime'."


1

The keys you have highlighted show non-alphabet characters and as a group are called punctuation which are used as separators in writing to help the reader. The exceptions would be > and < which are not usually used in writing composition, but can be used in program coding or mathematical formulae.


1

A book will probably not help you since there is no way to hear the sounds. These days, there are many dictionary applications and websites which sound out words, and of course, there is always Google translate (though it may sound a bit robotic). There is also the possibility of forming a close relationship with a native speaker...


1

In high school and junior-high school in Japan, the symbol x' is usually pronounced as "x dash". However, in universities it is also read as "x prime". I think teachers in university are strongly influenced by Americans. I read it in both ways in a university.


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