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105 votes

Does the English language have a word explaining a song in your head that you can't stop singing?

You can use "Earworm" which means: a song or melody that keeps repeating in one's mind
helen's user avatar
  • 4,284
73 votes

How often do native speakers use the word "to scathe"? Is it OK if I use it instead of "to injure"?

The verb itself is almost never used in every day English, but there are two adjectives formed from it which are common: "scathing" means extremely harsh, biting, critical; e.g. "he ...
IMSoP's user avatar
  • 4,396
52 votes

Does the English language have a word explaining a song in your head that you can't stop singing?

You could say the song is "stuck in your head". I haven't found a dictionary listing the phrase, but here's a Time article on the subject, with the title "Why Do Songs Get Stuck In Your Head?" For ...
Kamil Drakari's user avatar
52 votes
Accepted

Are "concur" and "agree" exact synonyms?

Concur and agree are synonyms, but "I couldn't agree more" is a set phrase. While they technically mean the same thing, replacing agree with concur in that phrase sounds a little peculiar. Concur is ...
Katy's user avatar
  • 11k
38 votes

Who is a "sibling"?

There is no difference between the usage of "sibling" and the usage of "brother" or "sister" except that it's gender-neutral. Your stepbrother is your stepsibling, and ...
the-baby-is-you's user avatar
36 votes

Are "concur" and "agree" exact synonyms?

Agree and concur are synonyms, but the English usage of them corresponds to their etymology. "Concur" derives from Latin concurrere, which literally means "to run (currere) together with (con) ...
alephzero's user avatar
  • 3,549
35 votes

Introductory word meaning "considering what was previously said"

What about good old "so"? German-made parts are way too expensive, so we ordered Chinese ones. This is by far the most natural way of saying this.
minseong's user avatar
  • 2,086
34 votes
Accepted

Are "I have no idea" and "I have no ideas" both correct, and if so, are they synonymous?

They are both correct and they do not mean the same thing. "I have no idea" means "I do not know the answer to your particular question." It is about a complete lack of knowledge. ...
ohwilleke's user avatar
  • 860
31 votes
Accepted

Word for unused in a while?

Make no mistake about it, by far the most idiomatic way to say that is with the word rusty: (of knowledge or a skill) impaired by lack of recent practice Something that's rusty has been affected ...
Michael Rybkin's user avatar
30 votes

Is the using of "present" and "gift" considered a matter of style?

In many cases they are synonyms, however a present is usually something that the giver has deliberately selected for the recipient. You can also call this a gift, but the word gift can be used for ...
Canadian Yankee's user avatar
24 votes
Accepted

Is "obey" a stronger word than "observe" in the following sentence?

I agree with the teacher. "Obey" is stronger, and may imply legal sanctions backing up the requirement. "Observe" is less official. So, while "obey" means "observe&...
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar
24 votes
Accepted

What is the word that is synonym to "right", and sounds like "rido"?

Alrighty then! It doesn’t sound like "rido" — it sounds like "righto", because that’s what it is. Per the paywalled OED entry: righto A. int. colloquial. Expressing ...
tchrist's user avatar
  • 8,295
24 votes

Do you know synonyms of "so-called"?

It is difficult to suggest any direct synonyms because prefixing something with 'so-called' is done for a variety of reasons and can mean slightly different things. It can suggest that you personally ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 106k
19 votes
Accepted

If something happened again, did it recur or reoccur?

They are separate words. Something reoccurs if it happens more than once. Something recurs if it happens more than once and at a regular interval. A good example would be your electricity bill &...
LMS's user avatar
  • 5,562
19 votes

Introductory word meaning "considering what was previously said"

I guess you want to use a subordinate conjunction (or a phrase with similar functionality) which simply means "because". In this context, I can mention several ones as below: Thus Therefore Hence ...
Cardinal's user avatar
  • 6,015
18 votes

Is "obey" a stronger word than "observe" in the following sentence?

"Obey" is not only stronger, it carries a greater connotation of being subordinate. If there is a rule that was agreed upon by a group of equals, it would be more natural to talk about ...
Mark Foskey's user avatar
  • 3,211
18 votes

Do you know synonyms of "so-called"?

purported https://www.dictionary.com/browse/purported adjective reputed or claimed; alleged: We saw no evidence of his purported wealth.
John Gordon's user avatar
17 votes

The right way to say "unload someone"

Perhaps, the word "relieve" meaning 'to take the place of someone and continue doing their job or duties' would suit better: I'm on duty until 2 p.m. and then Peter is coming to relieve me. A ...
Yulia's user avatar
  • 2,850
17 votes

Is there any difference between humblebrag and false modesty?

Firstly, false modesty is an uncountable noun, and humblebrag can be either a count noun or a verb. The two terms are certainly related, but to me, as a native US English speaker, there are some ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.9k
16 votes
Accepted

The right way to say "unload someone"

The phrase lighten one's load is not uncommon. The Synonym Finder lists Lighten one's load, lighten the load, or ease the load as synonyms for disburden, unload, assist, aid, unburden, and help.
Davo's user avatar
  • 4,130
16 votes

How are "pursed" and "rounded" synonymous?

The expression 'purse one's lips' refers to the historical type of coin purse in the form of a bag gathered at the neck. When we draw our lips together as a sign of disapproval or concentration, they ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
15 votes
Accepted

“I hope he visit us more often” Why is this wrong?

You want to look into subjunctive mood. The verb "desire" falls into the subjunctive category, so the following verb takes the subjunctive form: I desire that he visit me more often. Notice the ...
urnonav's user avatar
  • 1,254
14 votes

If a legatee receives a legacy, what is the legacy giver called? Maybe legateer?

The legal term here is... testator - a person who dies leaving a will or testament in force ...but you'd rarely hear that in normal conversational contexts. Ordinary people don't have a word for &...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
14 votes

Why is "the same" always with "the", but "identical" without it?

They do not have the same grammatical category. Same can be an adjective, like identical. But when it is used with the and no following noun phrase, it is a noun (or a pronoun, depending on your ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 76.1k
14 votes

Who is a "sibling"?

The distinction is not as much in terms of dictionary definition, but more a matter of individual and cultural preference. Technically "sibling" means "brother or sister," it feels ...
Chris Sunami's user avatar
12 votes

Is the using of "present" and "gift" considered a matter of style?

The etymology of "gift" relates to something given to another person. This would be something freely given, regardless of the relationship between the two people, and not necessarily for any reason. ...
JBH's user avatar
  • 3,777
12 votes

Does the English language have a word explaining a song in your head that you can't stop singing?

The German Wikipedia on "Ohrwurm" lists earworm as a loanword from German. To be more precise, it is a calque (thanks @PLL), a word for word translation of the two parts Ohr and Wurm (ear and worm). ...
Arsenal's user avatar
  • 221
12 votes
Accepted

What do you see if you enter 'clip' in the Windows 10 Search Box or Cortana?

Screen clipping and snipping are synonymous in this context, and both are used by Microsoft. All copies of Microsoft Windows from version 7 onwards will display this behaviour. While the built-in ...
Werrf's user avatar
  • 5,620
10 votes

Introductory word meaning "considering what was previously said"

Given: assigned as a basis of calculation, reasoning, etc.: Given A and B, C follows. dictionary.com So your sentence would read: German-made parts are way too expensive. Given that, we ...
AndyT's user avatar
  • 2,133

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