24

I agree with the teacher. "Obey" is stronger, and may imply legal sanctions backing up the requirement. "Observe" is less official. So, while "obey" means "observe", they aren't exact synonyms, and the latter is more likely to be used in the context you are discussing.


24

Alrighty then! It doesn’t sound like "rido" — it sounds like "righto", because that’s what it is. Per the paywalled OED entry: righto A. int. colloquial. Expressing acknowledgement, assent, or compliance; ‘OK!’, ‘that's fine’, ‘agreed’. Cf. righty-ho int. It means exactly the same thing Right! means. Their earliest citation is from ...


18

"Obey" is not only stronger, it carries a greater connotation of being subordinate. If there is a rule that was agreed upon by a group of equals, it would be more natural to talk about observing the rule. If a king has issued a decree, then you would obey it. Note that this distinction is not hard and fast; neither word would be wrong in either ...


7

To bring something about actually causes something to happen (it's something that a conscious agent can deliberately do, as well as the possibility of, say, one situation X causing another situation Y). But entailment doesn't work like that - it's a logical relationship, not something that a conscious agent can actually do. Either Situation X entails ...


5

While it's not an "urban saying"* or any specific English idiom, there's a bit of a cultural distinction here. It's safe to assume that the original lecture was delivered to a primarily American audience. In the US, Volkswagen is a brand associated with small, compact cars - most notably the various variants of the Beetle. So the metaphor works - a ...


5

Yes, this expression is used, but it is a special-purpose expression. It is used to emphasis that the thing named is unacceptable. It can be used to sternly forbid someone to do something: In future you will neither remove nor deface any part of the apartment. It can also be used to firmly refuse to do something one finds morally repugnant: I will neither ...


5

To reword Jack's answer, "observe" and "obey" have different connotations: a feeling or idea that is suggested by a particular word although it need not be a part of the word's meaning, or something suggested by an object or situation For example: Get home by 6PM for dinner. Obey me. I suggest that you observe the 6PM dinner time.


4

The word “expound” would be appropriate for conveying the idea that someone is speaking in great detail: expound present and explain (a theory or idea) in detail.


4

The article itself answers the question: Despite common belief, the window sill is found on the outside of the home. Inside the home, the part of the window often called the "sill" is actually the stool. However, the stool is often described as the sill, even by window experts. The article makes it clear that what the majority of people (even '...


3

You are unlikely to come across a reputable dictionary not giving just the bland and obvious 'happening: something that happens / has happened; an event / occurrence' definition for the primary sense. And then the 'extravaganza' sense. This is misleading, not reflecting the restrictions found with the use of 'happening/s'. Collins Cobuild rightly gives a ...


3

No, the two words have different meanings. It is quite normal to see a mirage in the desert (it is not strange) but it is an illusion. On the other hand, it is strange that the government has shut all schools due to disease, but it is very real. Their origins are different too. Illusion is comes from Latin "en-ludare" suggesting "mock, or ...


3

If you say I gave the boys an apple each. We understand "each" to mean "to each boy" Similarly we can say I eat two apples each hour. It is a lot of apples, you will get sick, but your grammar would be correct! But without context we can't understand "each" to mean "each hour". So I eat two apples each. Is not ...


3

“in the flesh” is used specifically for people, meaning that their actual human flesh is present rather than some representation of them. Your dream becoming reality wouldn’t be “in the flesh” unless that dream is specifically about a person. A business has no flesh.


3

These are railings So are these


3

Main title The main title is the music, often later recorded on soundtrack albums, that is heard in a film while the opening credits are rolling. It does not refer to music playing from on-screen sources such as radios, as in the original opening credits sequence in Touch of Evil. A main title can consist of a tune sung by the leading character over the ...


2

You'd usually say it was simply cut, or that it's cut content (more so in videogames), or a deleted scene (in movies). Left on the cutting room floor is a more poetic way to refer to deleted scenes or content.


2

Not really. One could rephrase to use "higher temperature" instead of "hotter" probably replacing "the weather". Perhaps something like "In recent years the world has been experiencing higher temperatures". But that is wordier and lacks the punch of the original, to no added benefit. There is nothing bad about using a ...


2

I would understand turn him over to mean transfer physical possession, as in: The local police turned the prisoner over to the federal marshal. Turn him in often means only to tell the police that he is the one they want.


2

Evolve isn't all that bad. Continue? Proceed? Iterate?


2

I would suggest, in the context, you say it is the finished, final or finalised version of the solution. You should use the definite article, ie "the final version", as there may have been several drafts but there is only one final version.


2

Person B is referring to the concept of client confidentiality. Confidential: marked by intimacy or willingness to confide Because therapy involves discussing sensitive matters, therapists must be able to convince their clients to share information that the client may consider private. This is made easier by the therapist's persona which is often warm, ...


2

As a speaker of American English I would not hear those sentences as identical. "I'll call round and see you on my way home." suggests to me that I will stop by your house on my way home (perhaps from school, or after running some errands). "I'll call around and see you on my way home." suggests that I will be visiting people all ...


2

"UR" is the "short name" of one of the parties to the contract. At the beginning of the contract there is probably verbiage similar to: This contract is made by and between Uniform Resources, Inc. (hereinafter "UR") and A-One Consulting Corp. (hereinafter "CONSULTANT"). So it is an abbreviated name.


2

She made a sharp cry of pain in reaction to the fall. The phrasing "a cry was wrung out of her" is poetic and emphasises it wasn't deliberate on her part but an involuntary reflex.


2

a cathy here: A former student at a Catholic high school. It could be a nickname for people who went to a Catholic high school. That is typical in Am. English. High schools or the type of high school are given nicknames. For example: A preppy. Someone who went to a prep school (college preparatory). It means he is a former student at a [name] Catholic high ...


2

My take is that they aren't exact synonyms, even if they seem to denote the same thing. "Many believe that..." is neutral about what follows. "Supposedly..." seems to put what follows into question right from the start.


2

In this case a synonym for "stamp" is "impression," like the shape pressed into a blob of sealing wax by a personal stamp: The idiom is "to have something pressed into one's mind" or "...imprinted on one's mind." It means that the experience is strongly remembered and has a long-term effect on the person, as if ...


2

The obvious alternative is “impression.”


2

That would be "matriculate". Strictly speaking it refers to the ceremony at which a person becomes an actual student. For most purposes, "admit" or "admitted" will result in better writing, in my view.


2

Names of actors (and others) displayed on the screen may be called titles. Music played with them may be called title music. Titles the beginning are opening titles. Music played with them would be opening title music. title music NOUN Music played during the credits at the beginning or end of a television programme or film. Lexico It seems this is in ...


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