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3

A "sale" is a noun in this context, meaning the event of selling something - in this specific context it refers in a general way to the money made from the sale, i.e. "Sales" means "the total amount of money made from all of the sales". Sales will double. ("double" is a verb) This refers to the process of that amount doubling, more transactions/sales, ...


3

Come is an irregular verb. The past tense of come is came. The past participle of come is come. She used to write this shopping list in squiggles, and then [used to] come back with only half the stuff that she'd gone for. Both write and come are infinitives here. They are both related to the same verb, used to. The author omitted the second used to to ...


2

A medical report is generally a written document. Even if it was written some time ago, you can still read it now, and the report still indicates that the murder was committed with a sharp instrument: present tense is therefore the correct option. You would use the past tense about a verbal report, for example that given by a witness at a trial: The ...


1

As user105719 has noted, 'bornt' is not a valid word. The sentences should be something like: I feel that I was born with a fun-loving nature. When I look back at my childhood, I liked to have fun with other kids. Hope that helps, Alan.


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Formally, "has finished," "had finished," and "have gotten." Colloquially, you'd be likely to hear "is finished," "was finished," and "get."


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Firstly, I think you already know this, but you should replace something with a more specific word or phrase: I don't think I did that. Let's look at each sentence in turn: I don't think I did that. I don't think I left the door unlocked [a few months ago]. This is the most common way to express this thought. "I don't think" is ...


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1: This is the third time I have traveled to Italy this year - FINE 2: This is the third time I travel to Italy this year - SYNTACTICALLY INVALID Note that I'm assuming the context is that the speaker is in Italy at time of speaking, in which case I suggest no native speaker would ever use #2 above. But you might sometimes hear it said before the speaker ...


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