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2

This is a good question. If someone asks How many children does John have in the circumstances specified, the grammatically correct answer would be He has four children because the question is framed in the present tense and so relates to the current situation. In social practice, such a question would likely elicit a more nuanced response like ...


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I lived here for two years. Means you lived there in the past and do not anymore. I had lived here for two years... You are right that this could indicate you still live there. If you said "I had lived here for two years when my brother came to visit", you are talking about how long you had been there up until a fixed point in time. You may still live ...


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This is comprehensible, but sounds unnatural. If sticking to a similar wording, I would say instead: “I appreciate that I had the opportunity to work alongside you” or “I am grateful to have had the opportunity to work [alongside you/with you]”. That said, I think this sounds a bit stiff. I personally would probably write a goodbye card in a slightly ...


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There's nothing inherently incorrect about repeating the continuous verb form in, for example,... He was feeling the fear rising up Homer Simpson is listening to Lisa playing her saxophone Everyone was watching, and feeling the tension rising ...where all those links are to valid written instances in Google Books. But it's a rather awkward ...


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For the first sentence, I agree with you. However, because of the time marker "this morning", I suspect that many natives would slip and use the simple past even if the morning hasn't yet ended, perhaps because of the sense of 'finality' involved in an international departure. Compare: "Colin has just left for Brazil this morning." which is a natural ...


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First of all, the example has some significant errors whixh should be corrcted before we try to build on it. Ram read story books during his childhood. Ram preferred reading story books when he was a kid. He became an adolescent and read story books. Now he is a teenager and still continues to read. "story books" because presumably Ram read more than one,...


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You use the past perfect to make it clear that some past event happened before another past event. I had suffered from cancer when I was 2 years old. This means that you had cancer before you were 2 years old. I suffered from cancer when I was 2 years old. This means that you had cancer while you were 2 years old.


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The correct answer is the second. Here is a bit more on the verb to make: to make Present Tense: make / makes Past Tense: made Present Participle: making Past Participle: made Examples Present Tense The boy makes chocolate cakes every month. Anna makes cookies for her study groups. The workers make tall buildings often. Past Tense ...


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The first sentence is active voice and the second is passive voice. Active voice, The subject is doing the activity. I am to deliver the money. In this example I (Subject) am to deliver (verb) the money. The subject is performing the action stated in the sentence. Passive Voice, the subject is being acted upon. I will rewrite the second sentence to ...


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If you look at the Active voice, it says, "Little strokes fell Great oaks" and it is important that you take note of the verb, 'fell' indicating past tense. So, if the sentence was to be changed to the passive voice, it will be correct if you use the past participle of 'fall', that is, ''Great oaks were felled by little strokes".


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