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By itself, your example sentence: 🚫 How this word is written? is not standard English. If this is a question, it should use inversion: ✔️ How is this word written? If this is a phrase, it depends on the context: The two police officers looked at a word written on the sidewalk (graffiti). ✔️ Alice: I don't know how this word ...


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The question refers to a moment in time which lies in the past, in relation to the moment that the question was asked: At which moment did he start being able to move so quickly? would be equivalent in meaning to the orignal question. At which moment in time does he start being able to... clearly doesn't make sense when referring to a moment in the ...


1

You need to think about what the teacher means by "we". From the perspective of the teacher, "we" means "I and you and the other students". When you report this, you change perspective, "I" becomes "Her", "you" becomes "I" and "the other students" is still "the other students". So the teacher's "we" will become our "Her and I and the other students"....


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Both are perfectly normal grammar, but mean very slightly different things. "He kept going until he saw the river." suggests that 'he' stopped (whatever is being talked about, probably walking/driving/etc) as soon as the river was in sight. So key thing is that this is present tense. "He kept going until he had seen the river." suggests that 'he' only ...


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They are very similar. Your examples are basically the same, and so the teacher is correct. The future continuous refers to an unfinished action or event that will be in progress at a time later than now.1 The use of going to refer to future events suggests a very strong association with the present. The time is not important, it is later than now, but ...


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Yes, however, it does change the meaning of the sentence. So as long as the second statement is true, it is appropriate. "Work in a school," refers only to the location where one works. "Work for a school", refers to your purpose and the organization to which one is employed. One can work for a school, but work for example at a public library. As a nurse, I ...


2

Yes, the change of tense suggests whether the position is temporary or permanent. This choice of preposition suggests whether you are "in" (either physically or figuratively) the bank/school. So a freelance programmer "is working for a bank" this month, but a teacher "works in a school". The programmer could "be working for a school" next month, designing ...


1

Your first sentence involves the use of remember with a gerund. The two 'exceptions' that you quote are actually a different usage, involving a that-clause. Many English speakers omit the that, but we know it should really be there: I remember [that] we talked about your not wanting to discuss your past. I remember [that] I used to look at it and ...


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followed is not past tense, here. It's the past participle, introducing an adjectival phrase, like We saw a house painted red Every man remembers a love regretted. Meals eaten quickly lead to poor digestion. The phrases painted red, regretted, and eaten quickly each function as adjectives, modifying the noun in front of them. The complete phrase here is (...


1

If you look closely, it is not a past tense but a past participle, acting like an adjective. If you break these sentences down, you get The stock starts up again. It has a rise of six or seven points in one day. It is followed the next day by perhaps eight to ten points—with great activity—but during the last hour of the day all of a sudden it ...


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Because she was in the process of eating, more or less, when she made the statement, so the gerund form was reasonable. Beyond that This is the last time I'll be Xing and This is the last time I'll be Xing here (for many different values of X) have become fairly standard phrases, and people use them without much attention to the strictly correct ...


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As a native speaker, my answer would be I was watching the cricket match. Past perfect continuous tense means the action began at a time in the past and continued at the point in time being described or was somehow incomplete then. In the context of your question, I (the student) am late for class now because I watched the cricket match that took place ...


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You’re right in saying that the past and present tense have been used. Thought and had are past tense and here it means they used to have thoughts about being supers (super heroes) But know it is (present tense) fantasy (impossible/imaginary)


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"I have been watching a cricket match" is wrong because there is no time frame, so we can not use present perfect continuous tense


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This is one of the most frequently made mistakes made by English speaking people. In this case, have and got mean the same thing; therefore have got is redundant. The correct sentence would be: I have a book.


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I was talking about something else when she started suddenly talking about what he was up-to these days. In your sentences, suddenly, as in “suddenly started,” is a misplaced modifier.


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The problem is that both of these sentences are very linguistically incorrect. A more correct expression would be something like: “Since when has he been able to move so quickly?” In many cases, the answers to questions like yours are more obvious when the sentence is spoken or written correctly to begin with.


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Both answers are **grammatically* correct. However, there's a difference in meaning. İn the 1970s scientists found out that chemicals, having been released into the atmosphere, destroyed the ozone layer. The above sentence (with the 2 commas added) means "the chemicals" just "destroyed the ozone layer" at one point (at a moment in time or just in a day). ...


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Although both of the other answers are close to the mark, the reason has more to do with the nature of the verb "claim". In this case "claim" is synonymous with "kill", specifically the mortal act itself and not the slow prelude. Which is to say we aren't talking about the eventual demise of these people but their actual death. It's different from saying ...


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This apparently depends on whether the situation is permanent or not, i.e. whether or not it is likely to go on in the foreseeable future. If it is a temporary situation, you use "is claiming", but if it is a permanent situation, you use "claims". Unless you're writing about a likely cure or game-changing treatment for diabetes, then there is every reason ...


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The present simple is used because it is a scientific fact that so many people die from diabetes every year. It is presented as a fact, not something happening temporarily. This has probably been going on for years.


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As I work on the content of the product, he is calling the software companies Are the tenses used incorrectly? Yes, if you rewrite the sentences like this they will work As I work on the content of the product, he calls the software companies As I am working on the content of the product, he is calling the software companies The original sentence mixes ...


1

I believe the construction to be correct. It may be recast as one of the following: “As I am working ... he is calling ...” “As I work ... he calls ...” “As I am working ... he calls ...” The meanings of all four possibilities are clear and identical in describing the state and actions of the two people. This is not to say that “I work” is ...


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Although it's constructed correctly, the repetition of the I do phrase is somewhat unnatural. The following would be better alternatives: I understand [w], [x] and [y] much better than I understand [z]. There is no real reason to use do in either location here. I understand [w], [x] and [y] much better than I understand [z]. → I understand [w], [...


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The first sentence is grammatically correct: I've been in love with you ever since I saw you. The second sentence needs to be rephrased, for example I fell in love with you at the moment I first saw you.


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It sounds very wrong to me. I would suggest: 'I knew the summer of 2012 was going to be bad, but at least the summer before had been one of the best I'd ever had.' Alan.


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Your case 1 "I have submitted" indicates that the act of submission occurred at some unspecified time in the past. Case 2 "I submitted" indicates that the act of submitting the information is complete -- in this case, completed shortly before the person signs. I have not been able to think of a context in which the meanings of cases 1 and 2 would be ...


2

I really like this list of Verbs of Attribution (or Quoting Verbs) from https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/quotations/ (and because it gives more information about using quotes overall, it's the one I most often shared with students): Excerpt: add remark exclaim announce reply state comment respond estimate write point out predict argue ...


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[Using all of the profane German I had ever heard], I ordered him to come out. "I had ever heard" is indeed tensed (finite) but it is a subordinate clause, more specifically a relative clause modifying the nominal "profane German". The subordinate clause is said to be 'embedded' because it is a dependent within the larger construction. It is the ...


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When discussing a book "says" is invariably understood to mean "includes in the written text" and is the normal way of introducing a quote: As Kipling says of Gunga Din: "You're a better man than I am". You could also write As is mentioned in {book title} "{quote here}" other verbs besides "mentioned" could be "given", "listed", "included", "...


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(1) The book states "blah blah". It's definition 1 of the verb 'to state' in Lexico: Express something definitely or clearly in speech or writing. Most example sentences there are in indirect form, but it can be used for direct quotes as well. As for (2), both options are possible. With the present tense, you emphasize the book is still 'alive' in ...


1

Using all of the profane German I had ever heard, I ordered him to come out. The non-finite clause starts at: "using all of the profane German". "The main verb has to be: Their main verb is either a to-infinitive [3], a bare infinitive [4], an -ed form [5], or an -ing form [6]:" The main verb for these purposes is defined as the first verb. That is "using" ...


1

The Past Perfect is used to refer to something in the past that was already in the past at the time we are talking about. Although you may think of this as an event that may be misleading you. For example I can say "I saw that the bus had arrived." The 'had arrived' indicates that the process of arriving was complete - so the Past Perfect is used. Other ...


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Classes have started/classes have been started/classes are started. Correct usage with reasons n conceptual clarity is needed.


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Once the sentence has gotten past "will soon discover", the rest of the sentence takes place from the perspective of the future. In particular, the clause "that we are not as meek as they had believed" takes place at the point in time of the discovery, at which point they no longer believe that the speaker's group is meek. The present perfect tense is only ...


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Both are possible. Normally the tense would match: I believed cats were evil. However, if you want to emphasise that you believed something that was unchangeable you could use the simple present: I believed that Elvis is dead.


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Could I suggest an alternative sentence: Would you please confirm if you have received and validated my Students ID that I sent last week. I am unable to work until I receive your confirmation. Thanks for your help.


2

"all day" is acting as an adverb, giving us more information about "raining". To show the pattern, here's an alternative adverb. it was raining heavily so I stayed in doors. The differences between the three phrases are to do with the tenses. Try each phrase without the all day: It rained yesterday so I stayed indoors It was raining yesterday so ...


0

Well it is a totally strange thing to do. I can't understand how removing "auxiliaries" helps you to understand English. Removing the auxiliary verbs completely changes the meaning of the sentences. But.... There are two "simple" tenses in English "simple present" and "simple past". So the question seems to be "find the verb phrase, and replace it with ...


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At first, you have to understand the correct use of Present Simple and Present Continuous. Present Simple is used to express: That something happens in general (regularly, often, never, ...), A daily routine, That something is arranged for the near future. Present Continuous is used to express: That something is happening right now, That something is ...


5

The verb build is used as "I build, you build, he builds..." The first sentence makes no sense that way. There is also a noun use of build (same link) but the first sentence still does not work when used like that. The past and past participle of build is built. So the second sentence is good, but it can be shortened to A friendship built on business ...


2

It sounds like you want to express a situation where tapping on the stone will turn it into a horse gradually, step-by-step, each tap making the stone slightly more horse-like, until with the 100th tap (or the final one), the metamorphosis will be complete. It also sounds to me like you want to know if the progressive verb tense, e.g.: tapp-ing, will convey ...


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These are all correct. However, "is" and all of its forms are considered a weak verb, and it creates a wordy sentence. Eliminating "is" results in a more concise and active statement, which is usually desirable unless something more important is going to happen in the sentence. For example, I was sitting there doing nothing when an airplane engine ...


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I have liked you since childhood is the best option, because "to like" is not used in the progressive form. It is a so-called non- continuous verb. It means you started liking the person in your childhood and you still like them in the present. This tense is called present perfect. The same goes for I had liked you since childhood, only here the situation ...


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