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2

The sentence: As it turns out your assuptions were true, as has been evidenced by her conviction for murder last week. is correct. Alternatively, "was" can also be used: As it turns out your assuptions were true, as was evidenced by her conviction for murder last week. Or, still better, we could use a reduced participial clause: As it turns out your ...


1

(Yesterday) I wrote down what she will say (tomorrow). There is a misconception sometimes expressed here that subordinate clauses in a sentence must have the same tense as the main clause. This is often the case, but it is not a grammatical rule, just that, usually the time referred to in the subordinate clause is the same as in the main clause. But there ...


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The question is confusing. If it is about the change of verb phrases, yes, they are subject to the rules of tenses. break down becomes broke down; take care of becomes took care of. If the question is about the changes in the verbs that follow verbs/ verb phrases in the past tense, again there should be agreement of tenses. Thus it should be "I was aware of ...


1

We You can't command yourself to do something. You can merely state an intention, as in we shall do it. You It's most unusual to begin a command with you. Rather than You don't open the door we would generally just say Don't open the door. The you is understood. It's possible to construct a scene in which three or more people are involved. A teacher might ...


0

Tense depends on the time of the action of the verb, NOT on whether the subject is specific or non-specific. Subject : You (specific) : Zero conditional : If you have an unhappy childhood, you are more protective of your kids. Conditional type 1 : If you have an unhappy childhood, you will be more protective of your kids. Conditional type 2 : ...


1

There are a few things that need to be mentioned here. First of all, the tense doesn't depend on whether you're referring to a specific person/entity or a "non-specific" person/entity. The only difference is that the verb would inflect (i.e. "you eat" would become "he eats"). For example: If I turn on the lights, I will waste electricity. If you ...


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IS Present tense matches 'Figure 2 shows' A past example could have been..."Before it was destroyed, Figure 2 showed a dialogue for creating an anchor. In that dialogue, the anchor was specified by a text pattern. Has been is valid too.


1

Yes. They're equally natural. Have you told him treats the telling as an act which continues to have relevance to now, did you tell him treats it as a completed act. Both forms are available in most cases.


0

"I thought John would have gone to your place" implies "but he didn't" or "but I was wrong". "I thought John would go to your place" doesn't convey the idea that something might have happened but didn't. https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/everyday-grammar-could-have-should-have-would-have/3391128.html


1

Examples 1 and 3 are both acceptable. Example 2 is incorrect. You could change it to "I've forgotten to add them, so I'll add them today." Personally, I find that when I'm trying to work out tenses, it's easier if I don't use contractions.


1

The correct answer is "There is no single correct answer that can be supported by an English grammar rule." I think the answer given by Micah Windsor and the comments that follow fail to address the central problem, and the one that Alex Raw seems to be concerned about, though he might have made it more explicit: what grammatical rule will allow you to ...


1

When I have look at both of your sentences, I cannot see to it that there is much difference in meaning between them. Nonetheless, let's point out some grammatical rules: 1) My sister often gets annoyed with her husband since he is always/constantly winding the children up. 2) My sister often gets annoyed with her husband since he will [always - ...


3

B Why? Notice the earlier word did. The sentence is constructed in the past tense. Since the most recent event in the sentence was Marissa getting home, and we are writing in the past tense, we use got. Since we know that she forgot her keys before arriving at her home, we need to make that clear by using the perfect past. Now we have our answer. ...


1

No, it's got, because he is asking about something where he had already gotten there (got there, British English). How can I know before I get there? would be used in speaking at a present time. The entire incident refers to a past event. You can have is in the final clause, that doesn't change anything. "whether or not the world in 2116 is a radioactive ...


1

The present perfect works here. "Present" tenses can often be used in "non-past" situations, and we are talking about the state at a non-past time. You could also use simple present: "I'll tell you if the situation changes". This slightly changes the meaning. The present perfect suggests that "I'll tell you about the situation and whether it has changed ...


1

Perhaps he said I had to make a bomb because he changed his mind and now he doesn't consider it necassary to make it or the situation changed somehow where he isn't required to make a bomb anymore. Or perhaps he needed to make a bomb at a particalar time in the past, but he didn't manage to make it. As you can see it's hard to say what he meant by that ...


0

I thought you did sleeping everyday till 13:00. This is grammatically incorrect. We usually don't use do + V-ing. I thought you used to sleep till 13:00. This is grammatically correct. However, "used to" here changes the meaning, and I think it doesn't correctly reflect what you want to say here. When you use used to, you're talking about a habit in the ...


0

Since the cause and effect are both conditions extending right up to the present time, the present perfect is correct for both, so the tenses in both sentences seem correct. As a matter of style, I think you could vary the verb forms by substituting "resulting" for "which has resulted" in the first sentence, and "depriving" for "which has deprived" in the ...


2

I am a native speaker, so my grammar might not be exactly right, but this is what these sentences mean to me. 1 is the present continuous - the present it refers to is 'this year', as opposed to last year. It says that the company at present is losing money. 2 is present perfect continuous and it refers to the state of the company in the recent past. The ...


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Oscar Wilde is the writer of the novel, "The Picture of Dorian Gray." is certainly correct since he is always the author of the book. The author hasn't changed even if he is dead now. Has he/she? As per your main sentence: Oscar Wilde wrote the novel, "The Picture of Dorian Gray." It could be correct, but it depends on whether you have mentioned the ...


-1

Both your sentences are grammatically correct, but their meanings are slightly different. The first sentence means that the writer is dead, but the writer is still alive in the second sentence. The original sentence doesn't imply whether the writer is alive or not.


1

They are all grammatically correct, and all convey the same general meaning. It seems that you are looking for a counterfactual situation, and this can be expressed with the perfect conditional: "would have". We generally backshift the condition to past perfect in this case. Break is verb that can is "ergative" so we can say "my hand broke", or "I broke ...


1

These sentences all seem correct, but they do not all have the same meaning. Let's go through them one by one. I lived in Tehran from 1950-1960. This seems pretty self-explanatory. You lived in Tehran. You lived in Tehran for the years you indicated. If the year is 1961, you aren't in Tehran anymore, unless you indicate it again. I've lived in Tehran ...


0

The first three examples are all correct, however examples 1 and 3 have a different meaning from example 2. Example 4 is also correct but has a very different meaning from the others. Example 1 and 3 express that in the past someone lived in Tehran and no longer does. Example 2 expresses that he is currently living in Tehran and has for a decade. Between ...


1

By itself, 2. means that you had stopped playing football when Ali came to join you (doing something else). But note that the same tense could also make 'I had been been playing football for 10 minutes when Ali came to join me', which means you were still playing football when he joined you.


0

We can use past perfect tense to talk about two earlier past events in one sentence if there is a continuation of the past events : I was having a shower at 7pm yesterday because I had worked very hard, and I got very dirty. IT IS INCORRECT. (The comma before 'and' and the subject 'I' after 'and' technically show here is no continuation, so past ...


1

I was having a shower at 7pm yesterday, because I had worked very hard, and I got very dirty. It is incorrect. ... because I had worked very hard, past perfect and I got very dirty.simple past You should use the past perfect of "to get", which is "had gotten" in AmE and "had got" in BrE. Don't confuse this with "have got" that is used in the sense of ...


4

Your sentence has taught me something new! Apparently, in British English people "have a shower", whereas in American English (which is what I speak) people "take a shower" (as also explained in the Oxford Learners' Dictionary). I'm glad I checked before suggesting that you should use "take a shower". Your use of the past perfect for the verb "work" is ...


2

Yes, it is grammatically correct and makes sense. I would remove the last I since it is obvious you are talking about yourself from the rest of the sentence, in this way it sounds more natural: I was having a shower at 7pm yesterday, because I had worked very hard, and got very dirty.


1

If she wanted to please me, she would pretend that she was happy. If I were you, I would imagine I was going to pass the exam. You can't use were in the above examples, because that specific use of the verb "to be" belongs in the if-clause of a conditional. You can't use the present tense either, because you're still describing hypothetical or ...


1

In scenario 1, it sounds like you are presently imagining or supposing what would happen in a hypothetical situation, in which case "imagine" and "suppose" should be in the present tense. If, however, you would only imagine or suppose something in the hypothetical situation, then "would imagine" and "would suppose" are correct. If aliens came to earth, I ...


0

The word "has" in the sentence "my sister has lived in China" would be coming for emphasis. Compare: Q: Have you done XYZ? A: Yes, I have done XYZ. how come in the answer it didn't just say "Yes I did XYZ"? What did the word 'have' add? It's emphasizing what was done, in a situation where there's a question about it. Likewise, in the sentence "She has ...


0

As Kate pointed out, in your particular example "when" would be better than "after". But since you're curious about "after", let's talk a little more about it. The choice of tense depends on the context. Here are some examples with the present simple tense: I'll come to your place after I pick up the kids from school. We'll probably get some dinner ...


0

Presuming the question is "which word is in error?" A.obtuse B.had C.were being D.ingeniously E.No error Answer: E.No error


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