New answers tagged

0

I didn't think you'd care about what I _____(think) of you. think [A general statement] or thought [at a point in time] or was thinking [ongoing in the past]. Other examples: Would you care what I think if I hated the movie? Would you care what I thought of you then? Would you care what I was thinking during the class?


0

Both "think" and "thought" are possible, as is "am thinking" The tense carries meaning, and so if you mean "What I in general think about you now" you would use the present. If you mean "What I thought about out at a past time" then use thought. The present continuous is unlikely in context, but not ...


2

In addition to Jeffrey's answer I'd just like to mention that this is a pattern you might recognize from some pretty simple English phrases. Take, for example, someone that is tired and wants to leave a party: I want to leave Now consider your question, slightly changed: Why can't we use "leave" instead of "to leave"? You probably ...


6

You have misunderstood. Offer can function as a catenative verb—that is, verbs that can be followed directly by another verb. Often, the second verb is a gerund. In other cases, the verb is an infinitive. That is the case here: Tom offered [verb] + to drive [infinitive] Wiktionary provides these similar examples (and many more): He agreed to work on ...


0

Perfect tense is used to emphasize the fact that something has been done, rather than talking about doing it. Because of that, it's generally not appropriate when combined with a specific time. But one can come up with situations where it would be appropriate. For instance, if someone asks "What times have you eaten lunch?", it's appropriate to ...


2

Both are correct, but convey slightly different emphasis, this is because of a slightly unusual situation that adjective and past participle are not derived the same way, as such exempted (p.p.) and exempt (adj) are distinct words. Exempt - adjective and verb Exempted - p.p. of exempt Other examples: Open/Opened Legal/Legalized Examples taken from: https:/...


0

Both are grammatical. There may be a slight preference for the gerund in this case because the reference is to an actual past event rather a future event, but I must admit my ear would not be offended at all by “to leave” or “leave” in this example. I do not agree with the comment suggesting that only the bare infinitive is strictly proper. In general, both ...


1

The solid waste collection rates had been increasing from 2000 to 2020, and then slowed in 2021. [For example]. You only use past perfect if there is another action in the simple past preceding it. AND: This region saw increasing rates of solid waste collection over the past two decades. If the two decades are not yet over: This region has seen increasing ...


1

A future hope or desire is something you want and expect could reasonably happen in the future. Because it's really possible, we use normal future grammar: "I hope Janice gets over the flu soon." A wish or fantasy is something that you'd like to see happen in the future, but you don't consider it reasonably possible, so you're not at all ...


-2

The difference between "wish" and "hope" or "would like" can be arbitrary. One definition I have read (which is not 100% authoritative), is that you hope for something that might in reality happen, but you wish for things that are mostly impossible or would involve a supernatural intervention. "I would like to go to The ...


0

Are you studying every night? is more likely in real life. Present continuous can be used for habitual actions during a period of time that is not finished. The present continuous is used to express repeated or habitual actions in the present that are temporary and may or may not actually be happening at the time of speaking: Lucy is taking piano lessons ...


2

I can imagine a situation where the reporter could say: I was talking about you for 2 years, when you decided to show up again. Certainly, many would argue that the correct tense would be I had been talking, but in spoken language, you will come across such uses. If the focus is the present moment, however, the reporter should have said: I have been ...


1

#1 is perfectly correct. In most contexts, we prefer to mark the future with "will," but doing so in some contexts is unidiomatic or flat-out wrong. Strictly speaking, the present and future tenses are identical in English. "Tomorrow, I fly to Europe" sounds a little aggressive but is otherwise unremarkable. #2 is objectively incorrect. &...


1

A time when I hadn't been born and A time when I wasn't alive are both correct. A time when I wasn't born is incorrect. Obviously the labor and birthing process is not instantaneous, but compared to the length of someone's life it is nearly so, and in any case it is not a continuous state of being the way "being alive" is.


1

None of these is wrong. Choice 1 puts the reader's PoV before the start of the test, while choices 2 and 3 put it after the reader is done with part 1. I agree with comments that "succeed in practicing Part 1." is awkward, in any tense. One may "finish" or "complete a part, or "succeed in it" or "successfully complete&...


0

It’s usually better style to use simpler forms when you can. Keep it short and sweet. There are some situations where the difference is important, though. Take the example: For more than a year, I wore a mask everywhere, but when I finally saw my parents again, they had gotten the vaccine. This is a compound, complex sentence with three clauses: “wore a ...


1

When we learn our first language as children, our brains are still forming, so we don’t need to be as aware of the details. We just learn what sounds right and what works for us. I grew up around quite a few illiterate people and am very aware of when they use words incorrectly. I’ve been learning Spanish for years. It’s in the same language group as English,...


1

Yes, speakers do notice tense. It is a fundamental part of grammar and the tense is "understood" when it carries meaning. On the other hand, there are many contexts in which there are several tenses that are possible with very little difference in meaning. "I've already eaten" and "I already ate" are very close, with the ...


1

Neither is correct. Did you use a dictionary before posting this question is correct. In general, people whose native language uses the present perfect as a general tense to express past time, overuse the present perfect tense in English. Notice that I am not saying "Have you done" or "Had you done" are always grammatically improper. ...


-1

I wouldn't use the word "have" here, it sounds out of place to me (an American). Instead, I would say a better question is: Had you used a dictionary before posting your question? or Did you use a dictionary before posting your question? Of these two, both could be correct but they have slightly different meanings. Did you use a dictionary ...


2

This is a classic example of how to use tenses in conditional sentences. Example one is correct, where first part is in present and the second part is in future. "If I become a member of the rock band after tonight's audition is finished," this whole is considered as one condition on which the second condition is dependent.


1

The only interpretation under which he works late is possible here is meaning he always works late on Mondays: there's a strong implication that the hearers know this, or should know this. The sentences you quote from the grammar book simply do not apply to this case, but I'm not clear why not. I'll think about it. Edit: I think I've got at least part of it. ...


1

The sentence, as constructed, is not sensible. What you have said is that you are driving a house for 10 hours. Since houses are not something one can drive, the statement can not be correctly interpreted, and the meaning must be guessed. Possible meanings could include: I am driving my parents to their home, and it takes me 10 hours to make that drive. I ...


1

It's because of the question Did you know..... The questioner is asking whether someone was (has been) aware of Sam's impending marriage. It's equally valid to use is or was in this context. A classical example is that of the round world. He said: "The world is round." Put that into indirect speech and you can use is round or was round. In most ...


Top 50 recent answers are included