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1 vote

What tense are used in these sentences with construction “it has been”?

They are all present perfect. In the present tense these sentence would be: It is a pleasure watching you soar That is a copular sentence with a dummy subject meaning "Watching you soar is a ...
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1 vote
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A common sentence structure with "would"

These are "conditional" sentences, however the condition has been omitted - either for tactful ambiguity, or because the condition can be inferred from context. The condition could be ...
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2 votes
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I "will come" or "come" to see my grandma every week?

Both C and D are perfectly possible. C means that this already happens - he comes to see his grandma (or she comes to see her grandma) every week. D is, as you say, a promise for the future.
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0 votes

In a unreal conditional sentence, what do we do if we want to express continuous tense?

I would have cut off the power if he "was" watching the TV at that time.
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1 vote

What are you talking about? vs What do you talk about?

As with most verbs, we use the simple present of talk only in narrative, or in a habitual sense. In referring to an event happening now, we would say are talking. So What do you talk about? is ...
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1 vote

What are you talking about? vs What do you talk about?

"What kind of thing are you talking about?" is assuming that the person has not finished speaking, and they may have more to say, or you may want them to say more. If you have interrupted ...
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1 vote

as if usage - whether it's "statement as if" or "subjuctive as if," it does not matter?

All of the example sentences are grammatically valid, and any might be said by a fluent speaker. The verbs have differences in tense and aspect, of course, but I would not speak of these as having ...
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0 votes

"have liked"/"have been liking"/"had liked"/"had been liking"

The difference are: a) 2 and 4 are not idiomatic in British English, or (I'm pretty certain) in American English - we simply don't use like with the progressive unless we're talking about a sequence ...
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0 votes

It "is/was" crazy that he did not attend school for a whole month. - is or was?

I'd like to look at example 3 first. She did not go on a road trip. That's indisputably in the past. However, the main sentence concerns not the road trip the ridiculousness of not going. And the ...
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6 votes

It "is/was" crazy that he did not attend school for a whole month. - is or was?

You can use either verb tense without being wrong. There is a slightly different connotation between the two phrasings, but it's very minor and won't interfere with understanding. In general, using is ...
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16 votes

It "is/was" crazy that he did not attend school for a whole month. - is or was?

In many circumstances, where the verb is in the past tense, you can use either. If it was crazy at the time and it remains crazy now, then either will apply. And that seems to be the case with all ...
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0 votes

Present continuous tense for a babitual or repeated thing - verb choices

Yes, you can. [The company] is manufacturing a new model. (Cars of this type are currently in production) We are building a new office. (Work is in progress or will begin soon.) He is eating salad ...
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3 votes

Confused about "he might have gone"

You're thinking about things in the wrong order. Here is the "right" way: Take two sentences. "He will go there", "He might go there". The first is about a certain ...
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1 vote

"ours being the last country” vs “ours is the last country”

This is not so much a matter of grammar as it is one of punctuation. As written, being may not be replaced with is. If it were, the complete sentence would contain two improperly joined independent ...
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0 votes

Conversion of tense in interrogative sentence from direct to indirect speech

Let's say that these sentences are written at 9:00 and that the actions that they describe occurred at 8:00. In that case, both sentences are correct. In the second sentence, both verbs are in the ...
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2 votes

Use of simple present

In this context, "dream" is being used in sense 2 of the verb as defined by Merriam-Webster. It's not referring to an actual dream Walton had in the past, but to thinking in a fantastical or ...
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0 votes

Tense when saying "This is the first time I"

This can be expressed in several ways, and here are the top three in my opinion, and in my personal preferred order of usage: This is the first time I eat sushi. This is my first time eating sushi. I'...
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1 vote
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repetitive actions: present perfect or present perfect continuous?

The book is correct, and there's no contradiction because both present perfect and present perfect continuous can be used to express repeated actions. These are grammatically correct: I haven't slept ...
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