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First of all, the two verbs in question (is and marries) do not necessarily have to be in the same tense, so it is possible to change one or the other of them independently of the other. Let's look at them one at a time. The first part is actually pretty straightforward: Their collaboration is important This says that their collaboration is important ...


0

Forget about "subjunctives". Would is a modal, and like all modals has two sets of meanings: deontic meanings, about objective things - possibility, willingness, obligation; and epistemic meanings, about the speaker's knowledge. Here the sense is epistemic. I would paraphrase the first clause as I deduce that or I am sure that Levana knew right away ...


5

That is the "simple present tense", which (although it is called a present tense) can also be used for future events, especially when the speaker believes that they are absolutely certain and unchangeable. The use of the simple present with a future adverb like "Tomorrow" is a rhetorical and poetic effect, which means "Tomorrow I will die, and nothing can ...


0

It is like, "Will you attend the meeting?" One said, "I won't attend." This is a definitive answer. The other person replied, "I am not sure; most probably, I won't". It is like, "As it stands now, I won't be attending." These are the minimum interpretations. There are also other situations when Simple Future and Future Continuous can be used.


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Here, we have to work mainly on two clauses: Dependent clause - Supposing they would have got married (It is dependent, because it cannot stand as it is, alone) Independent clause - Wouldn't the day have come... ? (This can stand alone; hence independent). Now, see the following examples. Some more examples: If they get married, the day will have come.......


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"I have got a woman at home." or "I've got a woman at home." are both correct grammatically. "I have a woman at home." is also correct. The grammar of "I got a woman at home." is not really correct by the standards of English teachers and/or grammar books. However everybody understands it, and it's very common to hear people say it that way casually in ...


1

I think your best approach is to try to avoid asking "have you used my computer?" You could instead ask, "Do you know if anyone else has been using my computer? I noticed that [describe the reason you believe someone else has been using your computer]." Asking the question this way conveys a little bit more trust-- you're asking the second person if they ...


1

What the answer is drawing on is possibly the notion of ordered conditionals 1, 2. The two of them never got married. The notion of their marriage is a hypothetical. This leads you to a so-called type 3 conditional and to the past perfect in the first part of the sentence (the conditional clause). Had they got/gotten married ... If they had got/...


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You can say had X {past-participle} as part of a question that uses past perfect. Had I gone to the park ..., had I walked to the store ... and was X {past-participle} as part of a question that uses passive voice... Was the dog walked by someone today? Was I informed by someone of X ... but {form of be} + {past-participle} + {another past-...


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"Had Ishaani known about the situation before, she wouldn't have felt so heart broken" Works (slight modification, "wouldn't" has an apostrophe, it's a conjunction of "would" and "not") "was Inshani been informed before, She wouldn't have felt so heart broken. Doesn't really work, and will likely confuse who hears it. "Was [noun] been" is not a pattern ...


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As long as the context makes clear what the missing information was, then you could simply say: Had Ishaani known, she wouldn't have felt so heartbroken.


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The obvious answer is that the past tense is used when talking about past events, and the present tense is used for speaking about the present. Leona works harder than any other lawyer in the firm. This indicates that Leona currently works in the law firm and that it is your current opinion she works hard than any other lawyer. The past tense is the ...


3

Both are correct grammar but the meaning is different. In the context of asking a friend about lunch later that day: What will you have for lunch? …means that he has already decided what he will eat, and you are asking what his decision was. What do you have for lunch? …means that he usually eats the same thing for lunch each day, and you are asking ...


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“I am playing game now” will be true for the current situation. But if some one is asking that what are your hobbies, then the answer should be “I play games”, “I read books” etc. but in this case “Now” is not used!


2

I would add this as a comment, but I don't have enough reputation. I would probably say "What will you have for lunch?" or "What will you be having for lunch" or "What are you having for lunch?". "What do you have (with you) for lunch" implies that he is already carrying his lunch with him, and you're just asking what he has. If I'm buying my friend lunch,...


1

They are simple present tense. They are examples that basic tense. I play games now. ... is a very basic sentence. May be too basic and simple to be used in real life situations. Hardly anyone says it like that in real life. I want a chocolate now. ... is also very basic. You may hear something like that in real life but saying it like that may make ...


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It probably depends who is asking and the full scope of the question, but I would avoid giving single word answers. Here is my reasoning: "I am playing football" is present continuous tense. "I play football every day" is simple present tense. "I will play football tomorrow" is future tense. "I have played football 3 times this week" is ...


1

Essentially, you are correct about how the tenses are being used. It's more understandable if you put it in context: John's about to show up. He wants to tell you something. He discussed it with me a while ago. At first, I didn't understand what he wants to tell you. But now I do. You should hear him out and consider his words. Barring that kind of ...


1

Either is correct, the 'he was' part isn't. There were documents in his briefcase which he needed to read before going in to work the next day. or There were documents in his briefcase which he needed to read before he went to work the next day.


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It's ok to use the present perfect tense if the time is not mentioned. If you talk about something you did yesterday or basically in the past use simple past. thanks.


1

if you fail is probably the form you want. failed implies past tense, that it has already happened, but can also be correct. Correct examples of fail: If you fail to explain to me where those coffee cups went, I will fire you. But also one for failed: If you failed to explain to Jeff yesterday where those coffee cups went, he will fire you.


3

Please tell me once eat lunch or Please tell me once ate lunch or Please tell me once have eaten lunch Well, none of them are correct. You wrote I want my friend to call me once he is finished his lunch. One way to say this is I want you to call me when you have finished your lunch. or Please call me when you finish your lunch. We can also say ...


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