A message from our CEO about the future of Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange. Read now.

New answers tagged

-2

In my opinion, the first sentence is correct. The concert will happen sometimes in the future. So this is already a future incident. There is no need to say, the next incident in the future. As per the rule if the first one is in future tense then the second one should be in the simple past tense.


0

I assume you want to use the open future condition which means that the first sentence is correct.


1

Grammatically, they're both fine. They differ slightly in meaning. In the second one, the completing and sending back both happened fairly recently. That subtle suggestion is absent from the first sentence's meaning.


0

You have obtained tickets. Meaning action is in complete state. So we are using the perfect tense here. Moreover the action is completed in near future so it is present perfect tense


3

(Following on Michael Harvey's comment) As you surmise, I go there at 3 pm points to a regular arrangement and would generally (but not necessarily) be followed by an indication of the interval, such as: on Wednesdays, on weekdays, each day. I will/shall go there at 3 pm points to the intention of the speaker. It leaves open the question of whether the ...


0

An online search shows that 'bornt' is used for 'born' in one dialect in northern England, but it's totally not standard English. No-one says that, no-one writes that in standard English, and no standard dictionary includes it. Where did you hear or read it? 'was born' v 'have been born'. Present perfect 'have/has been born' is only used when there is a ...


1

As user105719 has noted, 'bornt' is not a valid word. The sentences should be something like: I feel that I was born with a fun-loving nature. When I look back at my childhood, I liked to have fun with other kids. Hope that helps, Alan.


0

You are right that you should not use present perfect with a specific time, so your first sentence is incorrect. You use past perfect to position one event before. another event. Your second sentence is incorrect because it refers to something that happened at a specified time. You could make it correct by changing the preposition so that eating lunch ...


1

Formally, "has finished," "had finished," and "have gotten." Colloquially, you'd be likely to hear "is finished," "was finished," and "get."


3

A "sale" is a noun in this context, meaning the event of selling something - in this specific context it refers in a general way to the money made from the sale, i.e. "Sales" means "the total amount of money made from all of the sales". Sales will double. ("double" is a verb) This refers to the process of that amount doubling, more transactions/sales, ...


0

A. It is done or It's done is used to refer to a work/job/process/task which is completed recently but it doesn't tell anything about the time when it was done. Example: Manager asks - Did you complete the report? You - Yes, It is done. whereas, B. It has been done is used when you want to use the passive voice instead of active voice in the sentence. ...


0

You could probably read it in a few different ways (and the context would probably let the listener know your exact meaning here), as it is a somewhat complex sentence, but I read the difference simply as follows: I like that you made it a point to bring me food before I started working this morning. You have already started working. I like that you ...


0

As the comment by Chris Mack says, the detailed meaning of this very short sentence depends on context, especially what the pronoun "this" refers to. The definition of what "this" refers to may very well be sufficient to determine whether a single report or multiple reports are required. The conditions of my release require me to submit my expected ...


0

The answer to your question is two-fold; there is a correct way of using the past perfect tense, and you probably shouldn't use the past perfect tense, unless you're writing an uneducated fictional character. If you want your characters to sound like country bumpkins you can have them say something like, "You see that guy over there? About a week ago he ...


0

It would seem to me to be because it doesn't necessarily relate directly to the present. For instance, you could say: I had no idea you were such a good chess player until you won the tournament. But it would make no sense to say: I have had no idea you were such a good chess player until you won the tournament. We also know it doesn't relate ...


0

"Does he say goodbye before he left" is wrong as it contains a mixture of tenses, but the meaning in context tag may be significant - the correct version will depend when the question is asked in relation to when "he" left. For example : "John just left." (past) "Did he say goodbye before he left?" "John is leaving soon." (future) "Does he say ...


0

All three are fine. In particular you don't need to know exactly when something happened to use the past tense, only that it was in the past. The present perfect is possible, but it slightly changes the meaning. Since it is talking about the present state it asks for the reason that you broke up, and haven't got back together again. It's a subtle ...


0

Tenses in writing meeting minutes purely depend on the nature of the work or job. If the matter is still in effects, you avoid past tense. Say - System checks were being done ~ System checks are done Why? Because even at this moment, the check is done. The team is checking on the machines ...is it still in effect? If yes, you keep ..is checking. ...


Top 50 recent answers are included