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"Not the first time" can be used in any tense. If a future US president were to suspend Habes Corpus it would not be the first time this has been done. When I leave home tomorrow, it will not be the fist time I have done so. When Caesar crossed the Rubicon, it was not the first time this Roman law had been violated.


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There is no rule that all the verbs in a sentence must have the same tense. The tense of each verb should match when the action in that verb occurs. It is perfectly reasonable to mix tenses if that accurately matches when the action occurred. Perhaps the most obvious example would when you are describing a series of actions. Like, "Yesterday I ate eggs for ...


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There's nothing inherently incorrect about repeating the continuous verb form in, for example,... He was feeling the fear rising up Homer Simpson is listening to Lisa playing her saxophone Everyone was watching, and feeling the tension rising ...where all those links are to valid written instances in Google Books. But it's a rather awkward ...


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I lived here for two years. Means you lived there in the past and do not anymore. I had lived here for two years... You are right that this could indicate you still live there. If you said "I had lived here for two years when my brother came to visit", you are talking about how long you had been there up until a fixed point in time. You may still live ...


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There are two questions here. One is verb choice after (temporal) since; a punctive verb usage is usually required (so 'since he got back / returned' is idiomatic, rather than 'since he was / is back' – although in conversation "... since he's been back ..." is almost certainly acceptable nowadays). ............... "I've got back" is fine though informal....


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If you look at the Active voice, it says, "Little strokes fell Great oaks" and it is important that you take note of the verb, 'fell' indicating past tense. So, if the sentence was to be changed to the passive voice, it will be correct if you use the past participle of 'fall', that is, ''Great oaks were felled by little strokes".


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"In the 1970s scientists found out that chemicals_____ into the atmosphere______the ozone layer." The option with the "released/had been destroying" is indeed grammatically correct. The sentence reads as follows: "In the 1970s scientists found out that chemicals that were released into the atmosphere had been destroying the ozone layer." So because of ...


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'Has been looking for' is about an action which continued up to the current moment (it could have stopped or not by the moment of speaking). The final 'is' represents 'is looking for you' (still) in a short manner - that action is (still) going on. You can't say 'is still' since that would mean another thing: 'he doesn't move', but you can put 'still' ...


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If you will allow me to make a few more minor tweaks at the same time: He is really in need these days. He can barely make a living for his family. Due to many problems, which you are not aware of, he become very sensitive recently. Unfortunately, his temperament had affected his job too, to the extent that I was worried he may lose his job! Apparently, ...


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The present perfect tense is used to describe something that happened in the past, but the exact time it happened is not important. It has a relationship with the present. The correct verb choice for your first example is left. This is due to the fact that the sentence includes the exact, explicit time of this morning. Both of the following sentences ...


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For the first sentence, I agree with you. However, because of the time marker "this morning", I suspect that many natives would slip and use the simple past even if the morning hasn't yet ended, perhaps because of the sense of 'finality' involved in an international departure. Compare: "Colin has just left for Brazil this morning." which is a natural ...


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Past Perfect: "When we talk about something that happened in the past we sometimes want to refer back to something that happened before that time." It's like a double past tense. Therefore, you might say "I had been there the previous year." "Previous" is before the events of a story, which is set in the past. Considering your example: I had ...


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The first sentence means other people didn't expect you to do something, while the second one means you had no intention to do that something.


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First of all, the example has some significant errors whixh should be corrcted before we try to build on it. Ram read story books during his childhood. Ram preferred reading story books when he was a kid. He became an adolescent and read story books. Now he is a teenager and still continues to read. "story books" because presumably Ram read more than one,...


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You use the past perfect to make it clear that some past event happened before another past event. I had suffered from cancer when I was 2 years old. This means that you had cancer before you were 2 years old. I suffered from cancer when I was 2 years old. This means that you had cancer while you were 2 years old.


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In this case, both "couldn't have done" and "couldn't do" would be acceptable in the sentence. Their meanings, however, are slightly different. "Couldn't have done" is in the past tense; "couldn't do" is in the present or future tense. The distinction becomes significant if we consider the context of the statement; Charlie Weasley was Gryfindor's star seeker ...


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This is a good question. If someone asks How many children does John have in the circumstances specified, the grammatically correct answer would be He has four children because the question is framed in the present tense and so relates to the current situation. In social practice, such a question would likely elicit a more nuanced response like ...


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The correct answer is the second. Here is a bit more on the verb to make: to make Present Tense: make / makes Past Tense: made Present Participle: making Past Participle: made Examples Present Tense The boy makes chocolate cakes every month. Anna makes cookies for her study groups. The workers make tall buildings often. Past Tense ...


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The first sentence is active voice and the second is passive voice. Active voice, The subject is doing the activity. I am to deliver the money. In this example I (Subject) am to deliver (verb) the money. The subject is performing the action stated in the sentence. Passive Voice, the subject is being acted upon. I will rewrite the second sentence to ...


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Was she upset because her uncle has died recently? Has died : refer to a very recent death. You could also use "had died" if it happened in the past, or before another action takes place. For example, Her uncle had passed away when she arrived the hospital.


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The simple future tense is used when an action is expected to occur in the future. The nature of it, however, is unknown. The future continuous tense is used to indicate that something will occur in the future and continue for an expected period of time. I’ll be showing you how to make a simple Chrome extension dashboard from scratch. The process is not ...


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As is often the case, there is no difference in the objective circumstances described by the two sentences. The difference is in how the speaker is choosing to structure events in time. "Has increased" says that the speaker is referring to a period of several years in the past and up to the present. It says nothing about what may happen in the future. "...


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