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Confusion in tenses

Confusion on Tenses I have divided my answer into 3 parts : I. Confusion - Past perfect tense The fact that OP is taking all the pain to master the tenses is admirable. Selecting an excellent grammar ...
James Mathai's user avatar
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"Had...been" or "Was...been," and "would have" or "would had"?

Third conditional, mixed conditional, Inversion If Ishaani had known before, she wouldn't have felt so heartbroken. is a third conditional as the structure is : If + past perfect, would/wouldn’t ...
James Mathai's user avatar
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How to use tenses correctly? Because I am having trouble understanding it with passive and active voice

In He had been good, 'good' is an adjective describing what he was like in the past. He had been waiting is the continuous tense. He had been flooded out is the passive voice. There is no need to use ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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Are you coming to see the movie?

The idiomatic choice for most dialects of English is B: No. I have already seen it. Option A, "I already saw it" is common but sounds like an Americanism to my British English ears. BrEng ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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Is this structure incorrect: past perfect + after 2 months since + past simple?

The first of your examples is wrong. The past perfect (here passive) is used: When you have two events in the past and the first event in the past (the 'past in the past') is expressed using past ...
BumbleBee's user avatar
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Why is it not past perfect for the word 'left'?

A very important use of the Past Perfect Tense is that it is used to clarify which event happened earlier when two actions were completed in the past. I had gone out in the garden when he left. It ...
James Mathai's user avatar
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Are you coming to see the movie?

As far as speech goes, you are safe to use either A or B. I would stay away from C when talking with people. The past perfect is used primarily when telling a story. The most correct answer is A. ...
ethan lamb's user avatar
6 votes
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Are you coming to see the movie?

The grammar is correct in all three, but the meaning is probably best expressed with a present perfect. Your reply is giving the reason why you don't want to see the movie now. That is a clear ...
James K's user avatar
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correct tense: [I am eating] or [I have eaten]

Neither. An idiomatic version would be I'm on my fifth burger. You could use the future and put the present perfect in a relative clause: This burger will be the fifth I've eaten today. And you ...
TimR's user avatar
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The combination of "hope" and "by the time"

Here's another way to think about it: Transport yourself back in time, to the time when they do not yet know about the missing car. I hope I will be miles away before they find out about the missing ...
TimR's user avatar
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Simple tenses for (un)finished actions

"I read /red/ a book" implies that I'm not reading a book now. Does future simple* mean an action that will be finished in the future? "It will rain tomorrow." Can this activity ...
user81561's user avatar
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Simple tenses for (un)finished actions

"The Sun will rise above the horizon." simply says something about a single event that will happen. It may happen every day thereafter or not, the statement says nothing about this. ...
timchessish's user avatar
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In general, most male adults have acted/acted rebelliously at a certain point in their lives. - are both acceptable when talking about a general idea?

In general, most male adults have acted rebelliously at a certain point in their lives. In general, most male adults acted rebelliously at a certain point in their lives. These are both acceptable ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
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In general, most male adults have acted/acted rebelliously at a certain point in their lives. - are both acceptable when talking about a general idea?

In general, most male adults acted rebelliously at a certain point in their lives. This sentence sounds better to me, because when you say "at a certain point in their lives" you are saying ...
Matt Molina's user avatar

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