New answers tagged

0

You're quite right. He knew... because he had used it before. After He knows... you would need ...because he has used it before.


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"Didn't know" and "failed" both refer to a time that is before the present. Using "had failed" explicitly puts the failure before another past event (which might be when he did not know, or might be when the sentence is set). Note that using "didn't know" instead of "doesn't know" outside a narrative suggests ...


0

To answer your last question, no, you cannot use present continuous tense to denote a habitual action. Habitual actions are represented using simple present tense. I am usually asleep around 3 PM. This statement is also correct. You can directly say this sentence or its alternative version using the simple present tense as follows: I sleep around 3 pm/ I ...


0

You need to remove "around". The first example is best: "I am usually asleep at 3PM" (I guess you work shifts?) "I am sleeping at 3 PM each day", is a possible sentence. But the adjective "asleep" is better. You can also say "I go to sleep at about 3PM" There is an idiom "to sleep around" and it ...


1

If the situation will be true for the entire duration of the vacation, "We eat..." fits a little bit better. If it's a temporary situation within the vacation that you are describing, the present continuous fits better: "Currently, we are eating in a restaurant every day, at least until we find a room with a kitchenette." But it makes ...


1

The second verb is also in the present perfect. The auxiliary "has" covers all the verbs in the list. Test it with a verb that has a different past form to its past participle (we use the past participle with "have/has" in the present perfect): She has made a cake and eaten it. not She has made a cake and ate it.


0

"have always been", because it is a continuous tense, it will really match with your sentence.


0

These examples should help: I have been playing football for the last 10 years. means, that I started playing football 10 years ago and I'm still continuing this activity up until now. I was asking this question yesterday. means, that action happened in a particular frame of time, and it has finished.


0

I'm 19 and I'm quite shy. I had always been like that since I remember and probably would still be if I hadn't met Rebecca... "had been" is the most correct one, though it is not included in the options. It appears like you are writing a story or something similar, and I think the sentence I wrote above will be the best fit. Had Been denotes an ...


4

In order to pay tuition fees and other expenses he works / is working four days a week in the university kitchen, while in the university holidays he does a part-time job. I'm not sure about the work / is working - frankly they both sound fine to me. Works perhaps suggests that he'll continue working four days a week in the kitchen throughout his degree, ...


1

I think Vince is saying that the progressive indicates a more tentative (less confident) hope or expectation, while the simple present indicates a more confident (more definite) hope or expectation. The difference is fairly subtle, but I would definitely expect "expect" (simple present) in We expect to publish an inquiry into this accident quite ...


2

I agree with the comment. The better choices are "is causing", because it refers to a recent change looked at as a progression, and "don't realize", since realization is a threshold question here (they do or do not realize). They're both grammatical, but the meaning fits better with "causing" and "realize". You could ...


0

She had changed a lot, and she was not what she had been. The second sentence is correct for that meaning. There is a point in the past (when she "was"), and her changing was before that, and what she had been was before that. In fact the first sentence has a contradiction: *she was not what she was


1

In colloquial American English: I got you = I've got you. The video is very clear: I've got you. The have is not dropped. It means I'm holding you and therefore, you won't be squished as they run along because the little dog (or animal) is in danger of being trampled underfoot by others. If you are about to fall off a roof or cliff,for example, and someone ...


0

I haven't listened to the audio yet, but I think there are three possibilities, all of which could make sense in this context: "I got", past tense, to talk of the past (including the near past) "I've got" = "I have got", past perfect tense, used to talk about the present, and "I got" as a variant of "I've got&...


0

Rather than a difference in timeframe, I would expect that "could not have been" is referring to a reason (whether left unsaid, tacked onto the end of the sentence or in a previous sentence), whereas the first sentence is a simple statement of fact. It was not snowing last Friday. It's one of the hottest Septembers on record. It could not have ...


0

They convey different meanings. “It was not possible that day” (What you were doing, was impossible that day even if someone would have helped you) “It could not have been possible.” It’s incomplete you need to complete it: “It could not have been possible that day without you. You helped me, and it became possible.” What you were doing, became finished that ...


0

I think both of the sentences with "could not" are redundant as to impossibility. I don't know what they might mean. Have you ever seen them in use?


1

To my ear, the most logical, or suitable usage/sequence of actions would be: Before I played the video game, I had been under the impression that all video games were violent. (The auxiliary in the independent clause, ...I had been [under]..., the past perfect is not necessary, it is rather advisory. So I have no problem saying: ...I was under... ); ...


1

It largely depends on the "voice" of your writing, which is a subjective, stylistic decision. In isolation, either statement reads fine to me, and would be reasonably understood. If you are already writing in the past tense, I would probably use the past-perfect tense in option B. You might specifically use this form more in a third-person ...


0

Most of my friends think "It was expensive" is wrong because the question is in the present tense. Do you think "It is expensive." is correct? There is no law that you must answer precisely the question asked. It's quite common to answer a related question whose answer you do know rather than the question asked. In this case, Tim may ...


0

Merriam-Webster defines expensive (in this sense of the word) as follows: commanding a high price and especially one that is not based on intrinsic worth or is beyond a prospective buyer's means If Tim paid for the jacket in full last month, then it no longer commands any price unless he is reselling it and has put a new price on it himself. It may be that ...


1

Present Perfect is normally used when there is a connection with now. "websites I have visited" suggests that you have finished visiting websites, so there is no connection with now. "websites I have been visiting" suggests that you are continuing to visit websites.


1

For me, neither sentence reads very well. Personally, I would not use either. If the intention is to compare the "something" with things that happened before 20 years ago, then I would not use either: Something has happened in the past twenty years that surely must transcend anything that happened before. If the intention is to compare the "...


0

The choice of perfect or past is usually a free one, in the sense that a speaker can choose either possibility to refer to the same events. The difference is not in the events described, or the times when they happened, but in how the speaker is choosing to portray the temporal relationships. When we use the present perfect ("have arrested") we are ...


0

Would it be much simpler to say that the latter,"The police have arrested a man," implies its a current event from the recent past. The former, "The police arrested a man," refers to an event that took place anytime in the past.


0

1 asks whether the person concerned is a smoker (not whether s/he is smoking at this moment). 2 asks whether the person concerned is smoking (tobacco/cannabis etc) at the moment.


1

I find the present tense unnatural (and somewhat illogical; you're discussing future events), but it is common usage by native speakers.


2

Going over this in my head, "such a thing" is a usage that seems to have been much more common fifty years ago. If a person was just saying this in conversation today, I think they would phrase it as: "I pray every day that doesn't happen." or "I pray every day that this doesn't happen." or, and I know this one is a little ...


5

Those all sound completely natural to me, a native speaker. "Pray" sounds more emphatic than "hope", and does not / will not are interchangeable here.


2

Everything sounds nice to me. Just the second one, I think that like this is better: "I pray every day that such a thing will never happen"


0

Both can be used in this case, but I'd prefer the present perfect tense, I think it sounds a little more natural.


0

Yes, it’s absolutely fine. There’s nothing there to indicate that you’re not a native English speaker. I think it’s better than “Ted’s screams and gunshots”, which takes the emphasis away from the action by replacing verbs with nouns.


1

The expression you ask about, "You go to school tomorrow." is normal and idiomatic in response to a question such as "When do I start school?" or something similar. You might also say it unprompted by a question, with an explanation: "Stop playing video games and go to bed. You [have to] go to school tomorrow." The "have to&...


0

There is no connection in meaning between "is played" and "has played" "Is played" is a passive voice construction. "He is played by me" is equivalent to "I play him". In the sentence "I play him", the subject is "I", the object is "him". In the sentence "He is played by ...


3

When we are talking about a period that stretches from some point in the past to the present, we generally use the PRESENT PERFECT tense - typically after the use of words such as past / since / recently. So prefer 1. However, it is noticeable that many native English speakers are now using the SIMPLE PAST tense in this context, a growing trend among BBC ...


0

If you asked me nicely, I might get you a drink. This means: Please ask nicely, and I'll perhaps get you a drink. (In practice it usually means "will", but in principle it is caveated with "might", so formally means "will perhaps".) If you'd asked me nicely, I might have got/gotten you a drink. This means: You didn't ask nicely, ...


0

If I said: "I had an assignment to complete for yesterday" what tense am I using? Had There is only one finite verb in your sentence and it is a past tense form. There is also no perfect or progressive construction, so this form ("had" on its own) is commonly referred to as "simple past" or "past simple". Tense is a ...


1

A cheat sheet that shows the most used irregular verbs A cheat sheet showing the most used irregular verbs Both are correct (although neither is a complete sentence, of course; both will become correct full sentences if you put "I would like" at the front of them). (I have added "the" before "most" to your second version, so ...


0

Do not mix tenses in this way. None of your examples above convey a meaningful time frame and each sounds wrong or confused. If you want to convey that an action was ongoing in the past, and is still happening in the present, use the past continuous tense: You have always ignored people, and I bet you still do. He has stayed there, ignoring all, even as ...


0

My mother died before I could visit her - that was a huge disappointment for me. The cheese I bought tasted of mould - that was a little disappointment for me. It is correct.


1

Yes, you can say that. It's a little more poetic than the more straightforward "That was a little disappointing for me", treating disappointment as if it's an object you can have rather than a general emotional state, but it's not at all uncommon to phrase it that way.


0

It's "had", as you suspect, and this is indeed the past perfect continuous (or "past perfect progressive") tense. I'm not sure what you mean by "two actions". There are already two verbs here: "been" (past participle of "be") and "driving" (present participle of "drive"). It doesn't ...


-1

The shortened word is indeed "had". "Would" is also abbreviated this way, but makes no sense here. The past perfect continuous tense refers to something that continued (in this case driving) before something else in the past. Nothing else is specifically mentioned, so the later time is the time that the sentence is set. Because narratives ...


0

You need "was" because it relates to when you saw it, not to what it is now. If you saw the item again and the price was the same you could say "I saw that the price for that item was still $7.99". If you want to say that the price is still the same now, when you are not looking at it you would need a separate statement. The only time you ...


0

Was because the item could've changed price since your purchase.


0

Neither. His name is. Start a new sentence. You should also cooler a picture of John if you can. Any kind of informal mention is ride. From my experience.


2

Only A) is correct. I saw that the price for that item was $7.99. "Was" agrees in tense with "saw"; the sentence is about an action or actions that happened in the past.


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