147

The term is "grand theft" and the category it goes into (based on what is being stolen) is "auto". Grand theft, also called grand larceny, designates theft that is large in magnitude or serious in penological consequences. Grand theft is contrasted with petty theft, theft that is of smaller magnitude or lesser seriousness. What constitutes "grand theft" ...


86

There are several terms used, depending on the size, number and where you live. If there are lots of small ones (grapes, apples, oranges): if you are American, you would call them seeds and, if you are British, you would call small ones seeds and slightly bigger ones (especially citrus fruit) pips. If there is just one large one (olives, cherries, peaches ...


67

The term "browser chrome" comes by analogy to "chrome" on vehicles — shiny surfaces that appeal to buyers/drivers. So browser chrome is the visible user interface, the menus and toolbars and icons and tabs and so forth, which are the parts of the browser that are actually distinct (from the webpages, which are presumably displayed the same by all ...


64

I am an actual transgender person, so perhaps I should speak to this issue. It is overwhelmingly preferred among my peers that the term transgender be used and that transgendered be avoided. I am a transgender woman. The verb is transition: I have transitioned. Transgender is part of my identity, as is Asian and bisexual. We do not say I have Asianed or ...


46

This is called a lining: material that lines or that is used to line especially the inner surface of something (as a garment)(MW) You would ask questions such as: What are those boots lined with? Is the lining removable? Do you have any gloves with fur lining?


46

Tacking is a sailing technique that allows you to sail against the direction of the wind. The speaker is using a metaphor, regarding how they can progress despite the problem of misinformation.


41

From Glen's answer on Quora, which also goes on to explain Chrome's name: In design terminology, 'chrome' refers to the non-webpage parts of the browser's interface - the toolbars, tabs and buttons


38

Your indicated keys, plus the three above and to the right of your indicated keys and the shifted version of the top row all generate "punctuation" characters. Keyboard keys are generally referred to by the default character they represent (rather than any shifted alternatives). The ones you've specifically marked are... ; is the Semi-Colon Key ' is the ...


38

Language is at the core of political and social struggles for rights and equality. Word usages often have meanings that could affect political rhetoric. One of the key issues in gender and sexuality studies is the debate over the topic if sexuality, or certain sexuality, is innate--something people are born with. This debate has raged for decades. Pro LGBT ...


37

There are a multitude of ways we can approach this. There are a lot of classifications and labels for things that can be reasonably marked as wrong in language. For instance, an error might happen in speech or it could happen in writing. It might happen more often in informal contexts or in formal ones prone to hypercorrection. Some errors appear everywhere. ...


36

In English, we can move the head of noun phrase, which normally appears at the end, to the beginning. This helps with the naming systems used in technical jargons and other situation in which we want to put the general category on the left, and the particular category on the right. In writing, we usually put in a comma when this reversal happens. So for ...


33

The anatomical term for it is the thenar eminence: However, this is a scientific term, known mostly to medical students and doctors. It's not in general use. I had never even heard of it until I started googling just now. A few sources say thenar prominence. If you're wondering, both "eminence" and "prominence" come from a Latin verb meaning to project or ...


33

A "hairline crack" is a very thin crack that threatens the integrity of some object. The "grip" is where you hold the golf club. The "graphite shaft" is the long part of the club, which these days is frequently made from graphite not wood: A 3-wood is a particular kind of golf club used for hitting the ball long distances: The man says the crack is "...


32

A place can be consecrated as a church and later deconsecrated.


27

Tack against prevailing winds is a nautical sailing term. Sailing against the wind is very difficult for a sailing ship – the force of the wind prevents the sails from moving the ship in that direction. Sails on sailboats can be shifted so that they can still get motive thrust from the wind within a range of degrees towards the wind, though (it depends on ...


26

"G" is "Ground Floor". In some countries, the bottommost floor of a building is the ground floor, and the floor above that is the first floor. In the US, ground floor and first floor are used interchangeably, with the next floor up being the second floor. "M" is "Mezzanine". This is sort of a "half floor" that doesn't extend across the entire span of the ...


26

As you noted, "chandelier" does normally refer to larger, more ornate pieces than this, despite its literal meaning of "candle holder". In general, a light that is fixed is called a "light fitting" or "light fixture" (in contrast to desk lamps, or standing lamps that are pieces of furniture and can be moved). A light fitting could be a "ceiling light", a "...


25

The earliest reference to the phrase that Google has on hand is from the Los Angeles Police department's annual report in 1936. It makes a lot of sense that this could have been one of the first uses: the Model T had only been on the market for about twenty years at this point in time. Car theft was quite likely a very new crime, and Los Angeles -- among ...


25

This is a False Flag operation, almost exactly by definition.


24

It doesn't. You've made an error in your classification. ELU is not a parent site to ELL. ELU and ELL are each other's sister sites. They are on even levels of the SE architecture. The main parent site of both ELU and ELL is Stack Exchange, though we rarely refer to SE as the parent site. The most common usage of parent/child on SE is to refer to sites ...


23

Most generically, they would be called lapels (the left lapel and the right lapel). And, to the best of my knowledge, it's absolutely irrelevant whether it's a coat or a bathrobe that you're talking about—they're still called lapels. There are different types of lapels such as notch lapels, peak lapels and so on and so forth, but they're all lapels.


23

There's a lot of specialist nautical terminology here. I'm not an expert on this, but I've done a bit of checking with people who know more, and I'm reasonably confident. For a sailing ship to be carrying an environmental condition - sea state, weather, etc - is a term I'm not terribly familiar with, but I gather it just means to be experiencing that ...


22

I've never heard of this either in the US. I was able to find it in the Collins Dictionary online. It appears to be BrE and what we in the US would call "pants". Maybe someone else can speak to how common it is in BrE. longs in British (lɒŋz ) plural noun 1. full-length trousers Edit: BrE users are reporting that this might not be BrE and that it ...


22

From Wikipedia: Composite (number) A composite number is a positive integer that can be formed by multiplying together two smaller positive integers. Equivalently, it is a positive integer that has at least one divisor other than 1 and itself. Every positive integer is composite, prime, or the unit 1, so the composite numbers are exactly the numbers ...


21

Without expressing awesomeness, the term is niche a recess in a wall, especially for statues. From the architectural feature the figurative meaning of "a special place" either in a professional, scientific or ecological context is derived.


21

Judging from your description, I think it is "slide show" (rather than animation, stop motion, or rotoscoping). From Wikipedia: A slide show is a presentation of a series of still images on a projection screen or electronic display device, typically in a prearranged sequence. Each image is usually displayed for at least a few seconds, and sometimes for ...


20

If software is тормоз because too many poorly implemented features have been added, then it is "bloated." This bloating might be the result of feature creep, as many 'small' features get added on one after another. Software that has suffered from this problem ends up being called bloatware. If it is тормоз because it is poorly written, and needs to be re-...


19

Wikipedia calls it Stone skipping. There is also a list of translations, for English it mentions: 1. "skipping stones" or "skipping rocks" (North America), 2. "stone skimming" or "ducks and drakes" (Britain) 3. "stone skiffing" (Ireland)


19

In English it is called Stone Skimming. The World Stone Skimming Championship is held annually on the Scottish Easdale Island every year. It will be held next week (25th September 2016). The official rules for the championship, as shown on their web site are: Skimming stones must be no more than 3 inches in diameter and formed naturally of Easdale ...


18

The difference between college and university is everything or nothing, depending on where you are in the world. There are a number of threads on the matter at EL&U, for example “In college” versus “at college” versus “at university”, “When I was in college…” Do you really mean college? Or university? and University vs college vs academy vs institute vs ...


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