35

The cover of a car's engine is called a bonnet in British English, and a hood in American English. Also, at the back of a traditional car design, the luggage compartment is called the boot in BrE, and the trunk in AmE.


24

In UK English there is a distinct difference between metre & meter. Metre is a unit of length. Meter is a 'measuring device' such as a gas or electricity meter. To torture the linked question somewhat: The two meters are set one metre apart. Further example I used the speedometer in my car to judge when we had travelled a kilometre. In US ...


24

In addition to the basic "Americans use hood and Brits use bonnet but it's the same thing", you can look at the origins for the term and see that they both also describe very similar pieces of headgear: A hood is a cold weather cover for your head...usually nowadays we would say it is attached to a jacket or coat, but it used to be more common for it to be ...


24

They are generally considered to be vegetables rather than fruit, regardless of how they have been classified by the botanical community. As for the name, in the UK they are most commonly called simply "red peppers", "green peppers", "yellow peppers" or "orange peppers" (or "mixed peppers" for a bag of ...


19

In American English, these "flexible diving platforms" are "diving boards". A Bing image search shows that diving boards look like what the original poster had in mind. If it is very clear from context that the object is used to dive into an artificial pool of water, the term can be shortened to "board". The International Olympic Committee's website ...


18

These are commonly called bell peppers in American English, and are often referred to simply by their color (red/yellow/green peppers). Paprika is a ground spice that's made from dried peppers, although the exact type of pepper can vary. Apparently, in other languages, paprika refers to both the spice and the plant/fruit, but it exclusively refers to the ...


17

They are called springboards (although they are often just called diving boards): springboard noun [ C ] a board that can bend, helping people to jump higher when jumping or diving into a swimming pool or when doing gymnastics Cambridge Dictionary


16

There is a cooking terminology difference between the two, yes, particularly in the US. If something is "minced" the implication is that it's chopped very finely with a knife or blade, either manually or with a machine like a food processor. It's much less common to use the term "mince" in the US to refer to meat that has been put through a grinder, which is ...


11

I have coffee on the outside This means that you have coffee on the outside of something. This does not mean you will drink coffee outside. For example you might be talking about the colour of paint: It's painted red on the inside, but I have coffee on the outside. "It has X on the outside" means that X is on the external surface of something. If you ...


11

As Lambie says, drinks are either carbonated or non-carbonated. I believe these are universal terms used in government or official communication. In the US: Carbonated soft drinks are collectively referred to as soda, pop, and in some parts of the country Coke (even for carbonated drinks that are not Coca-Cola). Non-carbonated drinks are referred to by ...


9

Gas is the US term for the fuel put in cars; the Brits call it petrol. Gasoline is the full word that gas is shortened from, but no one is likely to say "I need to put some gasoline in my car" (though we would be likely to say "Your garage smells like gasoline!" in the US. When it's being put into a car it's gas; when it's being discussed in any other way ...


9

The hood is the term used for the hinged opening to a cars engine compartment in American English. Bonnet is the term for the same thing in Britsh English, so you will see both used depending on where the writer of the article comes from. In order to check the condition of a car particularly a second hand one before buying it, it is considered important ...


8

In the US, the terms "soda," "pop," and "coke" (small "c") all refer to carbonated non-alcoholic beverages, but depending on locale, only one will actually be used with regularity. In general: "Coke" is most used in the South. Note that "the South" does not extend west of Texas, despite the name. I have been advised by Southerners that, if you ask for "a ...


7

I think it's over-optimistic, and probably not very possible, to try to derive a formula to come up with the right choice in all situations. In short, I doubt the usefulness of the proposed rule. In my (American) experience, both pronunciations for anti/semi/hemi are used interchangeably, and probably inconsistently even in an individual's lexicon. On the ...


7

There's no "correct" in this situation without the nation of use. It is "correct" in the UK to say maths and "correct" in the US to say math. It's a regional word, much like the use of: biscuit vs cookie bonnet vs hood boot vs trunk Plus, if you think about the full word, maths sort of makes more sense... the word is "mathematics", after all.


7

You're right, they are both correct. Which one is better depends on who you ask. In the USA, it's spelled "gray"¹ and in the UK, it's spelled "grey". A fun mnemonic for this is A for America, E for England. Plenty of other words do this also. Color/colour, fiber/fibre, liter/litre, etc. The population of the USA is higher so gray is technically more common....


6

The or in The moose (North America) or elk (Eurasia) implies that moose is used in North America, whereas elk is used in Eurasia. In fact, the article goes on to mention: Alces alces is called a "moose" in North American English, but an "elk" in British English; its scientific name comes from its name in Latin. So what you call it depends on the ...


6

This ngram shows use of the word in British English: This ngram shows use of the word in American English: As you can see, it is used in both, but more so in British English. American English speakers tend to use the word to mean that something is beautiful, or nice, particularly another person (for example "you look lovely" or "she is ...


5

There are a number of ways to refer to a thing not as a particular instance but as the prototypical entity, as the class to which individual things of its type belong. Among them are the zero article and the definite article. Did you look in the dictionary? That idiomatic use is not referring to a particular dictionary (M-W, Cambridge, Longman's, Oxford,...


5

Well for me this is how it goes. Before and after school, in the Uk, in most schools, you have form where you take a register and do different stuff. That is what I would call a form tutor. Whereas someone who teaches lessons is a class teacher In the USA this is called a homeroom and the person who is in charge is the home room teacher


5

The basic term is carbonated/uncarbonated water or carbonated/uncarbonated drinks. It would be the "technical" term. Not the everyday one. In the UK, they say fizzy drinks for stuff like Coke and in the US, they say soft drinks. As for water, sparkling water is used in both for carbonated water. carbonated carbonated and fizzy drinks [UK]


5

As well as being called bell peppers in the other answers, they are sometimes also called Capsicum in some English speaking countries, as per Wikipedia Bell pepper. Capsicum is actually the Genus name of the plant.


5

As an AmE speaker, I know what the word means, and I take it at face value when I hear it from a BrE speaker since I know it’s more common for them, but I can’t think of any time I’d use it sincerely. There always seems to be a more specific word that fits better. I do, however, use it insincerely, such as when damning with faint praise. For instance, when ...


4

In the US it's always on the test. "I hope you do well on the test" is correct. "Try to stay relaxed in the test" is not anything that I've heard. The more common preposition is "during the test" -- although if someone said "in the test" I'd know what they meant.


4

There's not very many patterns that would help in most cases. Small patterns exist but you are better off simply memorizing the spelling of common -ce and -se words. For example - the c in -ace or -ice at the end of words is almost always pronounced /s/, whereas the s in -ase or -ise would be usually pronounced /z/. So use -ce in that situation. There ...


4

"I need "Gas / Petrol / Benzine / Gasoline" for my car." In AmE, "I need gas for my car" refers to gasoline that you would buy at a gas station. But "I need gas for my stove," or "I need gas for my heater (or furnace)" refers to natural gas that is usually piped into your home by a utility company. You ...


4

Case 1: the information about the theorem is necessary for him to find the solution but he might need other information too. Case 2: the information about the theorem is all he needs to solve the problem.


4

Springboard is the term. When I used to swim and dive regularly, (in UK), the 'boards' were the solid platforms that had steps up to them - often at three different levels. Hence the 'top board'. The springboard was a flexible board, often longer than the others, (its inboard end was further from the water), and sometimes adjustable in the free length over ...


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