3

The dot denotes where a word is broken into syllables UK ee•rie /ˈɪə.ri/ US eer•ie; /ˈɪr.i/ (two syllables) beau•ti•ful; /bjuː.tɪ.f ə l/ (three syllables)


3

You ask is it "suitable". It does have a purpose, but may not be suitable for you. English is sometimes taught (to young native speakers) as having long and short vowel sounds, for example the "short a" [æ] in "ban" compared with the "long a" [eɪ] in "bane". You will notice that the "long a" isn't at all a longer version of the short a, but a dipthong. ...


2

In a phonetic transcription, the apostrophe (actually a short straight down mark placed between letters above the line) indicates the primary stress, and a similar mark placed on the line indicates secondary stress. A dot placed on the line indicates a syllable break. See the section on "suprasegmentals" in an IPA chart In General American pronunciation the ...


2

He is talking about the operation he had, and says: ..and when I woke up, I became different from everybody else in this room because I no longer breathe through my mouth or nose. I breathe through... what's it called? (Audience: "Stoma")


2

It is generally accepted when the stem ends with a sibilant, the plural suffix is /ɪz/. However, many native speakers actually have a final-obstruent devoicing, meaning that the /z/ is realized as [s] when directly followed by a silence or a voiceless consonant. The transcription /ˈlæŋɡwɪdʒɪz/ is a phonemic transcription; it is not meant to be phonetically ...


1

Tell me why you'd (you would) be interested in pursuing a career as an accountant. This is a modal meaning of "would" that indicates determination or intention. It has no essential difference in meaning to: Tell me why you are interested in pursuing a career as an accountant.


1

"Boot cop buddy movie with some stupid animal sidekick" This is trying to define a very specific genre of movies. Commonly-referenced movie genres tend to be quite broad - for example Romance, Comedy, Horror, or Action. There are also many sub-genres which require further definition, like Romantic-Comedy which contain elements from two different genres. Yet,...


1

He actually says "you don't want to get caught in a Home Depot". Home Depot is the name of a popular home improvement retailer in the United States. The guest on the show already mentioned at 1m35s that they were going to 'Home Depot' to buy an air conditioning unit, so you had, in fact, heard the name already. Perhaps it was clearer when she said it? ...


1

"... to ask people on stage to look at the camera ..." Then say "please look at the camera", you shouldn't be using the noun "attention", as you are not asking for attention to the camera, you are asking people to pose for a photo. "Please smile for the camera" is also fine, but usually it would go something like Okay everybody, everybody, um, could ...


1

Where I come from (US English), "use" as a verb is [juːz], and the third person singular form of it ("uses") is [juːzəz]. For the noun: singular is [juːs], and plural is [juːsəz].


1

According to Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English 5th edition, Collins Cobuild 6th edition, and Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary 3rd edition, there is a /ər/ sound in Universe. That means we should pronounce the "e" before the "r". "Universe"--again, according to these dictionaries--should rhyme with verse, terse, and curse.


1

In example 1, Jim doesn't need to repeat the sound: he could easily explain by referring to the distinct meanings, for example: Jim: Do you want the spelling for "which cake do you want?" or for "the witch cast a spell"? As for example 2: if it's spoken, the issue doesn't arise, and if it's written, then phonemic script /tuː/ would be the clearest way of ...


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