86 votes
Accepted

English equivalent of a Spanish expression that translates to "iron fist, crystal jaw"

Its English equivalent is ‘he can dish it out, but he can't take it’ defined by Cambridge English Dictionary as: someone easily criticizes other people but does not like it when other people ...
user avatar
  • 17.7k
71 votes
Accepted

Can "he" and "man" refer to all genders?

You are opening a "can of worms!" This is a topic that can cause strong emotions. It is also not a matter of grammar, but a matter of style. English doesn't have a pronoun that singular, non-neuter ...
user avatar
  • 153k
50 votes
Accepted

Is there an English equivalent for the Italian saying "It's another pair of sleeves"?

In British English, you can indicate that two subjects, things or situations are completely different by saying about one of them: That's another kettle of fish That's a different kettle of fish ...
user avatar
  • 56.5k
39 votes

Can "he" and "man" refer to all genders?

Leaving aside current views on gender identity, historically, "man" has been used as an umbrella term for both genders - and it still is, unless someone objects to it. "Mankind" refers to all human ...
user avatar
  • 74.3k
36 votes

Is there an English equivalent for the Italian saying "It's another pair of sleeves"?

The first thing that came to mind was "That's a whole new ball game" or "That's a different ball game", but that saying is primarily used for situations and not things. As ...
user avatar
  • 11.8k
32 votes
Accepted

English equivalent of "garam" (warming) food?

Western cuisine does not have a direct equivalent to garam, as there is no philosophical division of foods as there is in Ayurvedic or traditional Chinese medicine. When the concept is translated, ...
user avatar
  • 17.6k
32 votes

Is there an English equivalent for the Italian saying "It's another pair of sleeves"?

The first thing that pops into my mind is That's a horse of a different color.
user avatar
32 votes

How do you say "enchufado" in English?

If we are specifically talking about a family member, nepotism is a good word. (It does not apply for friends, however.) patronage bestowed or favoritism shown on the basis of family ...
user avatar
  • 858
31 votes

English equivalent of the Russian idiom "притянуть за уши" + opposite of "to abbreviate"

The idiom I would use is ‘grasping at straws’, for which Cambridge English Dictionary gives two definitions: Grasp at straws: trying to find some way to succeed when nothing you choose is likely to ...
user avatar
  • 17.7k
25 votes
Accepted

Is "drawable" a correct word?

English is fairly flexible and open to the creation of 'new' words and compound words from familiar prefixes and suffixes, "-able" being one such example. A Google search finds quite a lot ...
user avatar
  • 74.3k
22 votes

Is there an English equivalent for the Italian saying "It's another pair of sleeves"?

In spoken American English you have that's a whole 'nother story, with emphasis on 'whole'. This same structure can be applied to some of the other answers here, such as "that's a whole 'nother ball ...
user avatar
  • 401
20 votes

English equivalent of "garam" (warming) food?

This is my take; I'm an Ayurvedic physician! Literally, गरम (pronounced - ga ra m) in Hindi is 'hot' in English - loud and clear. But, in India, what we mean by गरम is producing body heat after the ...
user avatar
  • 64.9k
20 votes
Accepted

English equivalent to the German "zig"

I don't know who told you that you can't use umpteen before million. M-W's Student Dictionary seems to disagree with that assertion: umpteen (adj) numerous but not fixed in amount : umpteen million ...
user avatar
  • 108k
20 votes
Accepted

How do you say "enchufado" in English?

From SpanishDict enchufe masculine noun (colloquial) (influence) a. connections Yo estoy mejor cualificado, pero le dieron el trabajo a ella porque tiene enchufe. — I am ...
user avatar
  • 45.1k
17 votes
Accepted

Is there a figure of speech for "illlness which passes without a special treatment"?

The first option I think of is "run its course" as in "You'll just have to let the flu run its course" See: idioms.thefreedictionary.com/run+its+course
user avatar
  • 2,565
17 votes

Geometrically, "face" or "surface"?

The word "face" is correct in a geometrical context, for example "a cube has six faces, twelve edges, and eight vertices". In this context "surface" often refers to the ...
user avatar
  • 4,358
16 votes
Accepted

Which one do you call "pepper", pimienta o pimiento?

Yes, most English speakers do call both foods "pepper". There are few ways to distinguish them if you need to. This is also known as black pepper (or red pepper, depending on the color): On the ...
user avatar
  • 386
15 votes

Is "drawable" a correct word?

Yes, 'drawable' is a correct and legitimate word I don't understand why you can't use drawable to mean 'something that can be drawn'. Perhaps it's just its unlookupability (or unlookupable-ness) or ...
user avatar
  • 17.7k
15 votes

English equivalent of a Spanish expression that translates to "iron fist, crystal jaw"

In the gaming community, there's the phrase glass cannon. What does “glass cannon” mean? “Glass cannon” is used to refer to characters or objects that are extremely powerful offensively yet are also ...
user avatar
14 votes

English equivalent of "garam" (warming) food?

Garam is simply not translatable to American English. This dichotomy does not exist in American understanding of foods. If you asked an American the difference between lemonade and almonds, they ...
user avatar
  • 8,134
14 votes

Can "he" and "man" refer to all genders?

Rather than "can these words refer to all genders" I'd propose to think of it as "are there texts in which these words refer to all genders", to which the answer is an emphatic "yes". It was long the ...
user avatar
  • 2,034
14 votes

English equivalent of the Russian idiom "притянуть за уши" + opposite of "to abbreviate"

As you say, притянутый за уши аргумент is an argument that is weak or fallacious. In English you might call it a specious argument, or one that doesn't hold water (i.e. full of holes).
user avatar
  • 240
13 votes

Is there an English equivalent for the Italian saying "It's another pair of sleeves"?

A slightly less common variant is "a whole nuther ball of wax" (with the misspelled "nuther" instead of "other"). It is definitely colorful...
user avatar
  • 858
12 votes
Accepted

Why has Marx's "Das Kapital" been translated to "Capital" in English and not "The Capital"

The article is actually used in other languages as well, for instance: in French Le Capital, in Italian, Il Capitale, in Spanish El Capital, and in Portuguese O Capital. In English “Capital” in ...
user avatar
12 votes

Can "he" and "man" refer to all genders?

"Man", yes. "He", no - but "him" and "his", yes. From a historical perspective, this is because "man" was a originally gender-neutral word meaning "person" or "human" (incidentally, "human" comes ...
user avatar
12 votes

Do I need to translate these weeds' names?

For a non-technical audience, you could describe Zhumaocao as a sedge, and Yashecao as a pickerelweed or a water hyacinth. You need to be savvy about the subject and the audience to make an effective ...
user avatar
  • 153k
11 votes

Is "She is under the shower" a proper English sentence?

It is an idiomatic saying in Italian, "stare sotto la doccia" (to be under the shower), and Italian speakers understand perfectly that the person is not being squashed by the shower cubicle, the ...
user avatar
  • 22.6k
11 votes

Is there a figure of speech for "illlness which passes without a special treatment"?

Two planets chat: "How are you?" "Not so good; feelin' miserable!" "Oh? What's up?" "I have Homo sapiens..." "Nah, don't worry: it will run its course!" I would suggest "Nah, don't worry, it will ...
user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible