47

In British English, you can indicate that two subjects, things or situations are completely different by saying about one of them: That's another kettle of fish That's a different kettle of fish It can be used verbatim, on its own, in various circumstances. If, for example, somebody brings up a subject that, in your opinion, is nothing to do with the ...


36

The first thing that came to mind was "That's a whole new ball game" or "That's a different ball game", but that saying is primarily used for situations and not things. As JavaLatte mentioned, this is more common in AmE than BrE. There are some variations on the phrase because "ball game" has come to mean a state of affairs, or a situation. Oh, you want ...


32

If we are specifically talking about a family member, nepotism is a good word. (It does not apply for friends, however.) patronage bestowed or favoritism shown on the basis of family relationship, as in business and politics


31

The first thing that pops into my mind is That's a horse of a different color.


29

Western cuisine does not have a direct equivalent to garam, as there is no philosophical division of foods as there is in Ayurvedic or traditional Chinese medicine. When the concept is translated, garam is generally translated as warming, and the opposite as cooling. If you are trying to preserve the original context and refer to Eastern concepts of warming ...


22

In spoken American English you have that's a whole 'nother story, with emphasis on 'whole'. This same structure can be applied to some of the other answers here, such as "that's a whole 'nother ball game". See http://grammarist.com/usage/a-whole-nother/ . In fact, using this structure you could probably even get away with a literal translation: "but that's ...


21

I don't know who told you that you can't use umpteen before million. M-W's Student Dictionary seems to disagree with that assertion: umpteen (adj) numerous but not fixed in amount : umpteen million things to do So, grammatically, I don't find anything wrong with your translation. That said, umpteen is an informal word in English – note how Macmillan ...


20

I believe you're looking for (killing) two birds with one stone. Apparently, it's a very old idea. Though, as comedian Demetri Martin observes: When in history has there ever been a surplus of birds and a shortage of stones?


20

From SpanishDict enchufe masculine noun (colloquial) (influence) a. connections Yo estoy mejor cualificado, pero le dieron el trabajo a ella porque tiene enchufe. — I am more qualified, but she got the job because she has connections. b. friends in high places (colloquial) Tengo un enchufe que te puede ayudar a conseguir un ...


19

If I understand your situation correctly, the normal way to express that in English would be one of "I do", "I can", "me neither", or "Not me": "Drat! I don't know how to open this bottle." "I do!" / "Me neither." "Does anybody know how to open this bottle?" "I do!" / Not me." "Can anybody open this bottle?" "I can!" / "Not me." A couple ...


19

This is my take; I'm an Ayurvedic physician! Literally, गरम (pronounced - ga ra m) in Hindi is 'hot' in English - loud and clear. But, in India, what we mean by गरम is producing body heat after the digestion. In Ayurveda, eggs, eggplant, chili, black pepper, etc. are considered as गरम, because the heat is actually produced when they are metabolized by our ...


17

The first option I think of is "run its course" as in "You'll just have to let the flu run its course" See: idioms.thefreedictionary.com/run+its+course


16

Yes, most English speakers do call both foods "pepper". There are few ways to distinguish them if you need to. This is also known as black pepper (or red pepper, depending on the color): On the left, you can see some ground pepper, while on the right there are some pepper kernels. You can refer to the small individual balls as pepper kernels or ...


14

There are myriad ways to express a sentiment similar to the one you describe. Here are a few examples: The above is purely for your information. This is solely by way of information. I write this simply to keep you informed of the situation. . . . keep you apprised . . . . . . keep you in the loop. In my experience (mainly in the world of ...


14

Garam is simply not translatable to American English. This dichotomy does not exist in American understanding of foods. If you asked an American the difference between lemonade and almonds, they would say one is liquid and the other solid, but the "garam"/"non-garam" spectrum would need detailed explanation. (Some very small percentage of the population ...


13

A slightly less common variant is "a whole nuther ball of wax" (with the misspelled "nuther" instead of "other"). It is definitely colorful...


13

The article is actually used in other languages as well, for instance: in French Le Capital, in Italian, Il Capitale, in Spanish El Capital, and in Portuguese O Capital. In English “Capital” in the economic sense is used without article: In economics, capital consists of assets that can enhance one's power to perform economically useful work. ...


12

If the "cable" is used for load bearing, then you could use unfinished (source: chinahisea.com) However, if it is an electronic "cable", then the term unterminated can be used. (source: gigalink-mce.net)


11

I have never heard the phrase "Jack-in-office" before. There are lots of words that are close to what you explained, but not exactly what you describe. Following the rules very closely, while missing the point of these rules is called "Following the letter of the law, not the spirit." This is a very common expression. To my knowledge, there is no word for a ...


11

It is an idiomatic saying in Italian, "stare sotto la doccia" (to be under the shower), and Italian speakers understand perfectly that the person is not being squashed by the shower cubicle, the person is "under" (below) the jet of running water. There are 100s of English phrasal verbs and idioms which cannot and should not be understood literally, e.g. "...


11

Two planets chat: "How are you?" "Not so good; feelin' miserable!" "Oh? What's up?" "I have Homo sapiens..." "Nah, don't worry: it will run its course!" I would suggest "Nah, don't worry, it will take care of itself." For a disease to "take care of itself" is a common phrase--even more common than "will run it's course"--for saying something does not need ...


11

English lacks such precise terms to describe fellow members of an age group. Occasionally in journalistic usage, we see the term cogenerational, but that feels contrived to a native speaker, and even worse, it has a previous usage which refers to power production. I first encountered the word Agemate a few moments ago in your post, and I've been reading ...


10

We can't really say if you're "overusing" the dummy it from a single example. But I think it's highly unlikely, because it's such a standard feature of English. Firstly, notice that in the previous sentence, I've used a second pronoun it to reference the initial dummy it. There's nothing unusual about that; we use dummy it all over the place. Secondly, I'd ...


10

From Roberts and Etherington, Bookbinding and the Conservation of Books: A Dictionary of Descriptive Terminology: edge index A form of the INDEX consisting of marks on the edges of the pages of a book produced by means of printed rules that run to the edge of the sheet (bled) and can thus be seen on the fore edge of the closed book. Edge indexing has ...


10

I get the impression you are looking for more than an equivalent expression - it feels as though you are looking for a cliché. I don't believe there is a football specific cliché for playing well but ultimately losing. However, there is a very common one for playing well without scoring: Team X failed to find the net. This carries the implication of ...


10

As others have said, the concept simply does not exist in English/American culture. The only people who would have even the foggiest idea of what you're talking about are those who have some acquaintance Indian cooking or culture, and if we discuss the concept in English, we borrow the Indian words.


10

Jobsworth A common term (in Scotland) for someone who follows the rules ad absurdum (as you eloquently state). Jobsworths are the unreasonably petty sort who appear to lack initiative and sound judgement, and there's always one nearby.


10

(AmE) I don't use or hear "agemate" or "batchmate". I might understand what you mean by "agemate", but definitely not "batchmate". Personally, "batchmate" sounds like computer programming jargon. If it interests you, please consider the following expressions. We are the same age. This does not imply that we were born on the same day in the same ...


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