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The greatest (e.g., singer(s)) in {the world, the United States, the universe, the village, Toronto} ... The greatest (e.g., singer(s)) on {television, the internet, radio, tour, the planet, Earth} ... The greatest (e.g., singer(s)) of {these, them all, the Americans, America, the bunch} ... The greatest singer in the United States implies she is living ...


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"There" suggests a physical space/place. You are at your desk. You're busy working and then look up and see a friend or acquaintance whom you only just noticed or were not expecting. You say: "Hi there". It is informal. It does not mean you don't know the person. In fact, you might know them very well. Or you are at your desk at home, and your child comes ...


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Yes, your usage is correct. I would remove the a: Work starts to pile up when approaching year's end. A year's end is very rare compared to year's end: Year's end also has a dictionary entry and is commonly used.


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I don't know what you mean by "get something confusing", but it's possible and may not be wrong, for example: "I get lots of messages that aren't completely clear. I got something confusing today." That would mean that I received a message that confused me. To "get something confused" could have two meanings. As in the example above, it could mean that ...


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Yes it could. 'When' would also be a valid alternative. Both 'when' and 'while' can be omitted only if it is clear who or what the modifying phrase refers to. In your sentence, 'while' or 'when' is omitted since "trying to catch knives" can be attributed to "people in cooking school". However, this relies somewhat on common sense, since syntactically it ...


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