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6

Sentence 4 is perfectly good, but less common than 5. As you surmise, 4 is similar to 3, and equivalent to I find that this article is interesting, which has a different meaning from 5. 4 means "I discover that this article is interesting" whereas 5 means "I judge or experience this article as interesting". They might be said in the same ...


4

No, a model is not necessarily a scientific model. For example people who build things construct physical models all the time, e.g. civil engineers building bridges or scenic designers building sets for a play. Modeling can also be simple, as you describe. I would say a circle drawn on paper is a representation of a sphere, rather than a model. But in ...


3

I found this: milk/suck somebody/something dry to get from someone or something all the money, help, information, etc. they have, usually giving nothing in return By earning millions from racing and giving pennies back, the bookmakers are sucking the sport dry. https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/dry_1#dry_1__189


2

You would never in normal speech say "This is one times that". You wouldn't say "This bag is one times as big as that bag". You would say "These two bags have the same size. So you would never say "This is one times as likely as that". You would say "These two are equally likely". Notice your dictionary ...


2

No, I would say "painted the plains with silverware" (not silverwares!) is not idiomatic. The phrase "painted the skies with gold," or as John Denver put it Dark and dusty, painted on the sky refers to the painting of a color in the sky, not an object. In your example I might say "scattered silverware across the plains."


2

I would not limit 'cheat day' to just diet but would also allow it for an exercise plan. I would not likely use it outside these two areas. One phrase I might use for other sorts of commitments is "let slide".


1

You don't have to use the preposition 'to' in the same sentence when speaking about relevance - you can simply say something is relevant and it would be assumed that you meant it in relation to the thing already being discussed. Your statement is not saying that textile production is relevant to history - it is saying that the history itself is relevant.


1

I suspect you've misunderstood what "5 times more likely" or "5 times as much" means. It means multiply. If one person has £500 and another has £100, the first person has 5 times more money than the second, not 4 times more. So logically "X is one time more likely to do Y" would just mean "X is equally likely to do Y"...


1

He has three brown rabbits and I have two white. To complement @James K's fine answer, there is a way to say "white" without repeating the noun "rabbits" or the pronoun "ones" and that's by using a "that" clause. He has three brown rabbits and I have two white ones. He has three brown rabbits and I have two [rabbits]...


1

The version with "ones" is much better. You may sometimes hear something like your example two. That would be more likely with words that can function as both nouns and adjectives. In that case you would probably use the plural form. For example "a grey" can mean "a horse with white hair". So you could well say I have three ...


1

One is active-voice and one is passive-voice. Generally, you can't simply swap a an active voice verb with a passive voice "be" + verb. In this specific scenario, however, you can replace "scored" with "were scored," but doing so changes the meaning. Saying "those who scored" is active-voice and explains that those ...


1

If you have a vessel of liquid, and you suck the liquid out through a pipe, there will come a moment when there is no liquid left. It is then said to be 'dry'. You have sucked it dry. To be more exact, dry of the liquid (gasoline, milk, beer, oil, whatever). Figuratively we can say that a supply of something has been exhausted by someone or something, using ...


1

It means, "without." In the above example, "to suck a bank dry of funding," means to remove all of the bank's money.


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