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3

Think of a similar sentence: They've kept a story secret for a decade. The grammar here is clearly explained by the dictionary, just under "keep": the verb is used "with object and complement". The object is "a story" and "secret" is an object complement because it describes the object. An object complement can be an adjective, a noun, or a phrase that ...


2

It's an adjective here. Compare the following, which have the same structure: It's a story they've kept private for a decade It's a story they made public a long time ago It's a machine they've kept clean for a decade First definition from OED: secret A. adj. 1. Kept from knowledge or observation; hidden, concealed. a. Predicatively (esp. in to keep ...


2

The more formal version is the following: 1. The point is . . . But at some point, this got shortened: 2. The Point is being . . . → Point being . . . The short form now has informal and idiomatic usage. Most likely, the confusion over adding is back in again occurs when people get stuck in an intermediate state between the original version and ...


2

The correct way to describe someone who is doing this is to say: You are waiting for me to make a mistake. "Waiting on me" is incorrect here, and so is "waiting me". "You are waiting for a mistake" would also be grammatically correct, but means they are waiting for anyone to make a mistake, not just you. "waiting on" correctly refers a waiter in a ...


2

No, broadsheet is a more general term as given by the Oxford Dictionaries here with its more specific use defined too. broadsheet NOUN 1 A large piece of paper printed with information on one side only. I have sent you a broadsheet which surveys our campaigns 1.1 A newspaper with a large format, regarded as more serious and less ...


1

You are right that the more idiomatic use is "adopted in" the strategy was adopted in 2015. However, as jonathanjo points out, the writer may have used "adopted from" to imply that the strategy has been continually active since the date it was adopted. Although I would not use it myself, I don't have a problem with it. It's not particularly elegant, ...


1

1) I believe your correction is technically correct. I would correct the sentence to: After the mission to the moon and to Mars and a proposed manned space flight before 2022, this is the next logical step for the agency. 2) I'm a little confused by your question, neither of these words/phrases are describing the mission. I have reworded the sentence ...


1

According to Macmillan Dictionary: It’s (only) to be expected = used for saying that something is completely normal It’s only to be expected that someone would have to cancel.


1

can I use two third in the same sentence[?] No. In a fraction where the numerator is greater than one, the denominator is plural. One third, two thirds.


1

The words "coming up" are a commonly used set phrase, if not quite an idiom. In the sense used in the question, they mostly indicate that someone is coming to a higher floor, particularly to an apartment from street level. Buzz the door open because I'm coming up. On the other hand, "I'm coming" in a comparable sense means merely that the person is on ...


1

I wanted to come to your party but I couldn't I would have liked to come to your party but I couldn't. In current usage, there is little if any difference between these two. When discussing a current or future desire, "I would like to" is considered by many to be more polite than "I want". Many others do not make a distinction here.


1

Very straightforward: "I want doesn't get" - some people consider it rude to say that you 'want' something. It is considered more polite to state your preference rather than your demand. For some reason chief executives and suchlike are allowed to say "I want this company to be ...". Such words suggests urgency but in normal social life urgency is not ...


1

Yes, it means "in connection with the investigation issue" or in this specific case "because of the investigation issue".


1

Functions can refer to a lot of things. There might be confusion if we are talking about functions and features in the context of products/marketing/technology. Functions describe what something does. It is goal based. It refers to what something does or is useful for. For example, one function of that smartphone is that it can be used to browse the ...


1

Both of them mean the same thing, which is to express the speaker's opinion about something. The difference is that one is less committal than the other. Sometimes people don't want to be direct when expressing an opinion. They might not be completely sure that they're right, or they might not want to set themselves up for a confrontation, or they might ...


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