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I don’t think “which” works in your first example, as “money” is too generic. For me, “which” would only work when you are talking about some specific amount/entity of money, as opposed to referring to just “wanting money”, as in, “I work because I want money.” Both are fine in your second example, but again I would go with “that” here. “When” is a somewhat “...


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Yes. This usage is perfect and means exactly what you said.


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The rule is: want takes a "to"-infinitive clause; can takes a bare infinitive (clause). These are properties of those particular words, as arbitrary as their pronunciation and meaning: they simply have to be learnt along with those other arbitrary properties. It might help to note that can is a modal, (like could, will, would, should, may, might, ...


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The first two "Map of the Municipality of Lisbon" "Map of the Lisbon Municipality" Are more or less exchangeable "Lisbon Municipality Map" sounds more informal. If you actually bought a paper object it might be labelled like that to save space on the cover.


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"While" has a secondary use that has nothing to do with time. It can also mean "despite the fact that; although". While [x] is true, [y] is also true. ... could also be written as... Although [x] is true, [y] is also true. A time-related example would be: While John cleaned the house, Jane stayed in bed. This means that these two ...


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Nouns Followed by Numerals On Day 2, the rats became more aggressive. I visited my grandmother on Floor 3. APA6 states to, “capitalize nouns followed by numerals or letters that denote a specific place in a numbered series” (4.17, p. 103). Examples include: On Day 2 of Experiment 4


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In general, whether you address your audience as a group or speak (or write) as if you were just addressing one person is mostly a matter of style. Either is completely valid. Depending on what you're saying, one or the other might be necessary for your statements to make sense. Like if you're saying, "You all need to work together", well one ...


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In these two cases use "and". But I would recommend adding "both" to them to emphasise that the initial words apply to two items. Thus making: "Isn't he immune to both a cough and a fever?" and "Isn't she interested in both maths and languages?". (For UK English I would use "maths" not "math".)


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I wouldn’t say that it’s only used for languages (though that is more often than not what it’s used for). Searching COCA for ADJ command of gave me some non-language examples: A good command of the Bible (A Modest Proposal for the Inhuman) A good command of the offense (What we learned in the ACC) Good command of the road (2012 Toyota Camry XLE - It's In ...


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Searching at Google Books, Google Books "a good command of" -language finds a lot of uses. Most are about languages, but a good many are about other things: a good command of the harbor a good command of combinations (chess) a good command of the basic foundations of measurement theory a good command of the subject matter a good command of ...


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You can see from the screen capture that the correct caption is "accused of".


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This is potentially ambiguous. The natural reading would be that more students chose it than chose any other reason. Another way of saying that is that it was chosen by a plurality of students. It would not have to be a majority of students (more than half) although it could be. However it is potentially ambiguous since we do not know whether they were asked ...


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If the author had backshifted it would be "... I'd never been to a bar". But backshifting is normally optional, and in perfect tense contexts it is common enough not to backshift. The meaning would be the same as "...I'd never been..." with the addtional implication of "and I've also not been to a bar from the time when I was ...


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Do is an an active verb and would is a possessive verb, and the Idea of the word "want" can be studied from many perspectives.


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In the sense you mean in your example to make sure someone is doing okay, be it in their work, health, or otherwise I think check up on is the best as this can carry the sense of finding out about their welfare. It can of course also have the sense of monitoring them in a work place or elsewhere as can check on. I would not use check in but that may be a ...


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As you know, Picasso died. He is dead. We can' t use 2nd conditional about him. Only can we use 3rd conditional right? All he did was past things. I guess the author takes us on 'the time machine' to the that time when Picasso was making something. So we ARE watching him painting something. But at this moment he can't judge ~~. So the author uses 2nd ...


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You haven't quoted the full sentence! It is: It was a matter of chance that I should have rented a house in one of the strangest communities in North America. The should-less version would more naturally be "that I had rented" rather than "that I rented". I agree there would no real difference in meaning. I also agree that "have&...


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