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will have is a way of discussing the future or future intent, either: (a) with respect to having something, e.g. "I hope they will have fun this evening", or (b) followed by a past participle, to form the construction known as the future perfect, e.g. "after two more years I will have lived here for five years". There's also "will ...


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The issue is whether the official title is The University of X not just whether its title contains the word university. For instance there are two universities in the English city of Bath: The University of Bath and Bath Spa University. For the first you would use The but not for the second. This is not an isolated example there are others like De Montfort ...


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At Quora, Richard Lueger, former editor, ESL teacher gives a reasonably comprehensive answer to the question of when to use “Do you know ...?” and when to use “Did you know ...?” [reformatted]: Both are correct but they will usually be used in different situations.... For example, “Did you know” is commonly used [often with a that-clause] either to remind ...


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If you want to ask whether somebody knows something then you could say: Do you know that girl's name? or Do you know what time it is? However if you are informing the person of something in the same breath it makes sense to say: Did you know her name is Helen? This is doing two things. It is informing the person that the girl's name is Helen, and ...


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As Ms. Bunting said, the premise of the question is weird, but I shall try to deal with the linguistic issues. The word “president” is both a title and an office. In lists, it is common to see the form President, XYZ as an abbreviation of the president of XYZ But outside the context of lists or the address block of a letter, the usual written usage is ...


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"Rather than" typically has a meaning similar to that of "Instead of". But when "Rather" is used on its own like this, at the beginning of a sentence, the meaning is more like "However". Let me explain (and watch what I do next -- I'll bold the relevant sentence). Just like, "However", the word "Rather&...


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There is an phrase "everything but the kitchen sink". It means "everything imaginable". It seems to have originated in soldier slang. "We threw everything but the kitchen sink at the enemy". The kitchen sink would be heavy and hard to move and not very effective as a weapon. It came to mean "with every imaginable feature&...


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"Rather" means "more preferred" (or "preferrably"), or "very" in some circumstances but at the beginning of the sentence it mostly means "on the contrary", or as exclamation, "certainly" (but that is considered outdated). Can you give the previous sentence, as well, for more context? EDIT: I believe ...


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The phrase pick up dates from the days when telephones had a separate handset and base. When it rang you had to pick up the handset to answer. Its use for a modern telephone is a figurative use since there is no longer anything to pick up. Given that its extension to other devices like walkie-talkies seem very natural.


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Both questions are unusual and uncommon, but they aren't wrong. They are grammatically correct and make sense, esp. in some "self-help" context.


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Both are correct and used interchangeably.


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I have a feeling that when what we are talking about is a general idea, we use the present perfect to refer to the past event instead of using simple past. Is that the way to look at it? No. That is incorrect. I will answer for British English. I'll choose to discuss example (2) Students in class often listen to the teacher and write down what the teacher ...


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For me the decision depends on how far in the past and for how long the action took place. I would write "have said" in (1). In (2) I prefer "said" or even "says". In (3) I would choose "has happened". Just "happened" suggests that you are considering a single event when you are interested in understanding a ...


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You can deliver on a promise (or a commitment, an undertaking, a contract,...)... ...just as you can intransitively... deliver - to produce the promised, desired, or expected results = COME THROUGH [WITH] Example usages: can't deliver on all these promises a hitter who can deliver in the clutch Note that without the preposition (deliver on), the "...


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The Online Etymology Dictionary has two pages on this, here and here.


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"Weird" is rather negative. "Strange" is still negative, but less than "weird". "Odd" is not as strong: it is more "normal" than something "strange" or "weird". You can see something is not normal, but it is not shocking. I offer you the following correction: A: Did you win the ...


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The correct translation for "I'm not altogether happy." is "I'm not completely happy." The translation you found, "I'm very unhappy" is simply incorrect. So, you are right. "Not altogether" does not mean "Not at all".


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Nothing is omitted. There is a an adverb and an prepositional phrase that serve as an introduction to the sentence. You can argue that a colon should not have been used. Perhaps a comma would have been sufficient. It just means the fact described in the sentence about animals is similar to that described in the previous sentence about plants. "With ...


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This use of a preposition phrase with "of" can be equivalent to a possessive (or genitive) use. for the use of children = for children's use this bar is for the use of members only = this bar is for members' use only In these examples with "use", it is the children and the members who use - they are agents or actors. That doesn't work ...


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Q. If the topic is already clear to everyone, can we use "it" directly? Yes. Most dictionaries define the preposition as "used to refer to that one previously mentioned", but 'previously mentioned' can include tacitly implied, or assumed to be understood. For example, "it is raining". One can say this without any prior dialogue ...


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The verb phrase here is "could be used". The word "could" is modal, and "be used" is the passive voice of the transitive verb "use" In an active voice sentence, the "grammatical subject" (the noun phrase preceding the verb) is also the functional subject (the actor, the thing that performs the action ...


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