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Yes, you are correct. As written, it is not grammatical. Also, it's a horrible sentence. If it's any consolation, much of the article is poorly written. To the author's credit, the advanced vocabulary is correct, and there are no other glaring grammatical errors, but the overall syntax is unnecessarily convoluted. For example NASA has now renamed the ...


0

According to information I read on the UWM.edu website, English is one of the languages that does not contain a gender neutral or third gender pronouns for referring to a "generic individual". However, it is possible to accomplish despite the supposed potential limitations, if one takes time to be more specific in their neutrality as you'll see an example of ...


1

According to Macmillan Dictionary: It’s (only) to be expected = used for saying that something is completely normal It’s only to be expected that someone would have to cancel.


2

The correct way to describe someone who is doing this is to say: You are waiting for me to make a mistake. "Waiting on me" is incorrect here, and so is "waiting me". "You are waiting for a mistake" would also be grammatically correct, but means they are waiting for anyone to make a mistake, not just you. "waiting on" correctly refers a waiter in a ...


2

No, broadsheet is a more general term as given by the Oxford Dictionaries here with its more specific use defined too. broadsheet NOUN 1 A large piece of paper printed with information on one side only. I have sent you a broadsheet which surveys our campaigns 1.1 A newspaper with a large format, regarded as more serious and less ...


1

can I use two third in the same sentence[?] No. In a fraction where the numerator is greater than one, the denominator is plural. One third, two thirds.


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Sometimes, Any rather emphasizes there are no exceptions. For instance, 'It is important that Member States encourage any deck crew member who might need to navigate the craft to have training and certification regarding the operation of such radios.' This phrase uses any to show that ALL the crew members, regardless of their qualities, shall have the ...


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Choice A "passed" is by far the most natural of the given choices. The phrase "time passed" is a very common one. One could also use "time passed by", but that is less likely in this context. "went by" would be natural, and the meanign woudl be about the same as "passed".


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How would I be making it his day by buying myself a new dress? The idiom is: to make someone's day. This can include it or not. How would I be making his day by buying myself a new dress? To make someone's day Question form: Are you making (it) my day by [doing whatever]?. You are making my day by [doing whatever]. You are making my day by giving me a ...


2

The more formal version is the following: 1. The point is . . . But at some point, this got shortened: 2. The Point is being . . . → Point being . . . The short form now has informal and idiomatic usage. Most likely, the confusion over adding is back in again occurs when people get stuck in an intermediate state between the original version and ...


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I think this is a case where Englsh is in flux. Historically, this is an absolute clause, with being as the (non-finite) head of the clause: a finite verb ('is') is not needed, and in fact not grammatical. This construction is still used in rather formal writing. But many English speakers are not familiar with this construction, and (I think) reanalyse ...


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It sounds as though you have done good research, and have largely found the conclusion. There is no reason one could not "dedicate oneself" using the second definition you gave, with or without quantifiers. In practice, these quantifiers are, where present, usually moderating ("I dedicated myself somewhat to the pursuit of painting"), as the phrase itself is ...


1

Both of them mean the same thing, which is to express the speaker's opinion about something. The difference is that one is less committal than the other. Sometimes people don't want to be direct when expressing an opinion. They might not be completely sure that they're right, or they might not want to set themselves up for a confrontation, or they might ...


3

Think of a similar sentence: They've kept a story secret for a decade. The grammar here is clearly explained by the dictionary, just under "keep": the verb is used "with object and complement". The object is "a story" and "secret" is an object complement because it describes the object. An object complement can be an adjective, a noun, or a phrase that ...


2

It's an adjective here. Compare the following, which have the same structure: It's a story they've kept private for a decade It's a story they made public a long time ago It's a machine they've kept clean for a decade First definition from OED: secret A. adj. 1. Kept from knowledge or observation; hidden, concealed. a. Predicatively (esp. in to keep ...


1

I wanted to come to your party but I couldn't I would have liked to come to your party but I couldn't. In current usage, there is little if any difference between these two. When discussing a current or future desire, "I would like to" is considered by many to be more polite than "I want". Many others do not make a distinction here.


1

Very straightforward: "I want doesn't get" - some people consider it rude to say that you 'want' something. It is considered more polite to state your preference rather than your demand. For some reason chief executives and suchlike are allowed to say "I want this company to be ...". Such words suggests urgency but in normal social life urgency is not ...


1

The words "coming up" are a commonly used set phrase, if not quite an idiom. In the sense used in the question, they mostly indicate that someone is coming to a higher floor, particularly to an apartment from street level. Buzz the door open because I'm coming up. On the other hand, "I'm coming" in a comparable sense means merely that the person is on ...


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One can "ask a question": Can I ask you a question? One can "ask a" + person: Where's the milk? I'll ask an employee. One can "ask for" + something: I asked for some extra ketchup. One can "ask about" + something: My student asked me about their test score. One can "ask of" + someone: I have something to ask of you. So, "ask for help" is ...


1

Yes, it means "in connection with the investigation issue" or in this specific case "because of the investigation issue".


-1

Yes. Using the article the in this sentence definitely makes it grammatically better than the original.


1

Functions can refer to a lot of things. There might be confusion if we are talking about functions and features in the context of products/marketing/technology. Functions describe what something does. It is goal based. It refers to what something does or is useful for. For example, one function of that smartphone is that it can be used to browse the ...


0

As a learner: "To understand electricity" is an infinitive clause. The infinitive clauses can take on the roles of a noun, or in other words you can treat them like a big noun when they are used as the subject! One form of making an infinitive clause is using "to + infinitive" pattern as the subject. For instance, To love and to be loved are the main ...


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Your question is specific to the example: To Understand (a) electricity (b) depends (c) on a knowledge of atoms and the subatomic particles of which they are composed (d). In this version, "To understand" is trying to communicate "In order to Understand". So if I wanted to define the message of this sentence. In order "To Understand electricity" I must ...


0

Maybe it's regional but I would never say "I am sorry" and I'm not sure I've ever heard someone else say it. I would just say "sorry" or maybe "sorry, what (did you say)?" I've heard people same "I'm sorry" but it sounds a bit formal/posh.


0

Well, you can, but I can tell you from experience that the result of "(I'm) sorry" is not guaranteed. Why? Consider the following: Sorry? Will you repeat, please? I did not get it. Sorry? I understand the words, but I do not get the meaning. Will you please say the same thing with different words? Sorry? Who the hell told you that? So, the same ...


1

Interesting. My second language is English and third German. Although because of mostly communicating in German , English has been pushed in background a little, and so deteriorated. I also felt this expression is sometimes used a bit too much . It does explain using it as function in speech. But , when used not between phrases , but literally 3, ,4 times ...


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