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2

There is no reason why on my period have having my period would be grammatically incorrect. Compare I'm on my first cup of coffee or I'm having my party. On is a very flexible preposition and one of its uses is to indicate something like being in the process of completing or working on: I'm on call I'm on duty I'm on the first question on the exam I'm on ...


2

Grammatically fine, "on my period" has the form of a prepositional phrase "preposition + (determiner+noun)". Idiomatically correct too. Idiom is determined by use and this is the phrase that is used. Whereas "on my flow of blood" is not idiomatic. As Lambie says "They are idiomatic expressions. You can't just delete and ...


1

No, 'to attack' has no inherent positive or negative connotation. Any connotation is dependent on the context in which it is used. In fact, in the first two examples you cite, the verb 'attack' is used to refer to unsubstantiated accusations, so, from a journalistic point of view, no value judgement is being made. The writer is simply stating that an 'attack'...


1

I would say the by examples in @ronald-sole's answer provide a means of achieving a goal. Reading is a thing you do when you want to broaden your horizons. A verb like cause may be what you want: Fear causes blood vessels to weaken. (Weaken is slightly more idiomatic than become weak.) In the scientific/medical genre, it might be more stylistically ...


1

By can be used with both nouns and gerunds to indicate cause - although your examples imply that blood vessels themselves fear, which makes little sense. However, you can say things such as: By effort we advance and By reading we broaden our horizons.


0

"student achievement" doesn't have an obvious metric. What are the units? Certainly not feet or liters. Maybe a good metric would be salaries after 10 years, or maybe 20 years. Or how many students end up in prison. Or how many children each student has in 10 years. Or homework scores. Or surveys asking students, "Did you achieve?" In ...


1

It is always best to imitate native speakers. The Google Ngram Viewer utility can be used to compare the frequency of usage of "no man's land" vs "no mans land". The usage created by non-natives is of no consequence. Usage of *no man's land" (possessive), for over 150 years, has been orders of magnitude greater and for the last 30 ...


-1

You are technically correct that someone would have to perform the action of opening a market, or a business, or even the doors to some event. However, to say a "market opened" is more of an idiom than precise English. Don't worry about it -- it's just something that English speakers say that doesn't quite follow the rules!


2

First, as I mentioned in a comment either was or got need to come between I and fed up. If you choose got, you can use the expression without with. I got fed up reading this book last year. is perfectly correct. This sentence can be used to mean I got bored (while) reading the book. And it makes more sense to me to get fed up with a book than with ...


4

No, it is not correct. Firstly the phase "fed up with something" is not a past tense verb, it is a participle phrase, so you need I am fed up with...." And secondly, while you can say "I'm fed up" (to mean in general) you do need a prepositional phrase "with..." to complete the expression. So it must be "I'm fed up ...


1

As this NGram Graph shows, "winter is back [again]" is used, though "winter is here [again]" occurs much more frequently. Google NGrams seems to show that "winter returned" is common, but all of the instances that I checked relate to a person whose family name is Winter. "Christmas returned" and "winter returned&...


1

"about 3000" is more than 3000, but "nearly 3000" and "almost 3000" isn't reached to 3000.


0

Well, of course you can use both tenses in a sentence because they can refer to different acctions. Consider: I agree [NOW] that he was wrong [THEN, two days or weeks ago, whenever in the past]. I don’t care [NOW] if she had a character development towards the end [end of what? her life? her career? her university? Could be any past period of her life that ...


2

Only "about 3000 people" can refer to more than 3000. "Almost" and "nearly" both mean close to but not yet reaching the number specified. Note that they can be used going down instead of up, depending on the context—but they still mean "not reaching or going beyond the specified number." I would say that "almost ...


1

A future hope or desire is something you want and expect could reasonably happen in the future. Because it's really possible, we use normal future grammar: "I hope Janice gets over the flu soon." A wish or fantasy is something that you'd like to see happen in the future, but you don't consider it reasonably possible, so you're not at all ...


-2

The difference between "wish" and "hope" or "would like" can be arbitrary. One definition I have read (which is not 100% authoritative), is that you hope for something that might in reality happen, but you wish for things that are mostly impossible or would involve a supernatural intervention. "I would like to go to The ...


1

"During" is a preposition. "During the weekends" is a prepositional phrase being used as an adverb to modify "I am too lazy to do anything but sleep." English permits adverbial modifiers to be placed in a variety of positions. Both of your versions are correct and natural. The difference is emphasis. Readers will naturally ...


-2

Homie came from WW2 Chicano veterans; they would call other Chicanos Homes, Homeboy, Homie. Like the little homie characters. So yes, it is a Latino slang.


1

The adverb unexpectedly is generally used to indicate that any reasonable person could not have expected something to happen. If you want to specify that you or she in particular didn't expect it, you have to explicitly say so: I spoke to her: I wasn't expecting that. I spoke to her: she wasn't expecting that.


1

This is a good question. The short answer is that simple present is much more common in written English. (Indeed, an attempt to get stats from Google Ngrams failed because neither “I’m wanting” nor “I am wanting” is even common enough to index.) When I’m describing a situation that never changes, or what I normally do, I always use simple present. When I ...


2

Attributive modifiers of this sort are extremely common, though the ones in your examples are not headed by past participles - there are no corresponding verbs with the same interpretation: *We blood the veins. (make so that they have blood in them) *We billed our snowman. (made our snowman with a bill) *The composer noted his melody well. (make so that it ...


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