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37

The doubled "to" is not English. The book is wrong. [The "get" passive is English. Ignore the irrelevant comments].


24

My guess is that there's a typo in the question itself. The test question should probably read: Don't get used ______ spoiled all the time. In this form, all four options make sense and they're testing whether you can recognize that the form "to getting" is necessary rather than just the bare "Don't get used getting spoiled all the time. So, the answer ...


11

Yes, they both refer to a past habit, but the meanings are different. "Used to" is used in two ways. I used to drink coffee every day. This just recounts what you drank and how often you drank it, and implies that this was in the past and you don't do it any more. This usage of "used to" means that something existed or repeatedly happened in the past ...


8

The phrase "Don't get used to to getting spoiled all the time." is incorrect English. It is the most obviously incorrect answer, since gerunds don't use an infinitive particle "to". The phrase "Don't get used to getting spoiled all the time" Is correct grammar. The pattern is "used to (noun phrase)" where here the noun phrase is a gerund. An infinitive ...


7

"Used to" is a specific idiom meaning 'accustomed to' , and not strictly related to any meaning of 'used'. 'Use to' is incorrect if it is intended to mean the same thing as 'used to' (though it's a common mistake). 'Used to' is an adjective phrase, so "I am used to ..." is present tense, just like "I am happy". The idiom is followed by a noun or noun ...


5

Think this way - "Why don't you practice the prayanama?"; "Ah, no. it's too tough."; "That's initially. Once you practice it daily, you'll get used to it." Certainly, you are not used to it now but then after some practice, you will be used to it. In this case of working for long hours that requires more endurance... You were used to .... -> you find no ...


3

Neither of your sentences is idiomatic English. I’ll start with your second one, since that presents a simpler problem I used to go there whenever he used to come there. Used to refers to a past timespan during which you repeatedly performed some act: during this period you made a practice of ‘going there’. But whenever, although it encompasses every ...


3

Your two sentence are slightly different in meaning, one is about drinking coffee, the other about the habit of drinking coffee, the habit aspect is implicit in the your first sentence and explicit in the second I used to drink coffee every day. habitually I drank coffee every day I was used to drinking coffee every day. I had become accustomed ...


3

The phrase "used to" functions more or less like a modal, similarly to "did" (though with exceptional behaviour when there is do-support). I used to drink coffee every day. → I formerly drank coffee every day. The phrase "be used to" is an entirely different animal. Here "used" has become an adjective. I am used to drinking coffee every day. → I ...


3

Have is not a stative verb in those sentences. The sense of have is definition 2.4 in Oxford Dictionaries (ODO): 2.4 (with object and complement) Cause to be in a particular state or condition. Notice you need the verb have + an object + complement. The verb is active, because you are causing the object to be in the expressed state or condition Look ...


3

Would and used to have very similar meaning but the main difference is that used to can be used to talk about past states while would only applies to past habits. Want to be a practising doctor is a state of mind not a habit/repeated actions. For more information, check this explanation at the BBC's Learning English website.


3

"Used to take" implies that he did it repeatedly but if it's referring to a specific incident (the first game) then it only have happened once.


2

Yes. You can use used to in the passive voice. You have used them correctly. However, it won't always be as natural as it is in the active voice. It depends on the rest of the sentence, and the context. For instance, sometimes it might be more appropriate to use "were/was once". This (house) was once the home of Susan B Anthony. It can create both a ...


2

You're absolutely fine to add a clarifying time period when saying "used to" - both your example usages are fine.


1

One answer is I didn't use(d) to be able to do it. It is spelled both with and without the "d", and people argue over which way is grammatical, but the pronunciation is the same for both cases.


1

I used to smoke As you correctly say, this "used" is usually used to to refer to actions that happened in the past which don't happen now. I used to be able to dunk when I was 20. I can barely jump at all now, and it has been like that ever since I tore my ACL. However, I smoked before. does not necessarily mean that it was happening in the past ...


1

Simple past tense is by far the most common, but I suppose it depends on your usage. If you're writing creatively or in a way which lends itself to building a scene, you could go with a descriptive route. Something like: I recall many times showering in the wild or bathing in the lake, the sun low on the horizon. Making the primary verb past tense works ...


1

After reading from this link, it makes more sense: 'Would' is used in a case where it's already been established that something in the past is being referred to. For example: When I was younger, I would bike to school. This sounds natural as opposed to saying something like When I was younger, I used to bike to school. In contrast, using 'used to' ...


1

As you surmise, the sentence is a bit of a mouthful, as though spoken by a child. And used to meaning that an action or practice was habitual, does not sit happily in the midst of it. The sentence, with my insertions in brackets, might have been better constructed as: I remember (that) when I was young I would always think that I had super powers ...


1

The test is wrong. Given the incomptetent composition of the proposition, the least objectionable poor English would be anwered by A. The individual that composed the proposition with 'get used' as part of the wording is likely over-paid. 'Getting spoiled' as a stative condition is acceptable as an attribute in vernacular conversation but generally, in ...


1

You question is about two steps 1) getting used to something 2) being used to something You can think of it this way first one must "get used to something", before one can "be used to something". Once you get used to waking up at 6am, you will soon be used to commuting to work. If you got used to something, then you were used to it. I ...


1

BE + used to is an idiomatic expression meaning to be accustomed to something . In this phrase, to functions as a preposition so it takes a gerund or noun phrase complement. Just in case you wonder why her followed by an infinitive verb(kiss), the reason is that to see is a verb of perception that often takes a bare infinitival complement.


1

Here is used to seeing means the person is aware of the act (her kissing other men) and has seen it on a regular basis (maybe multiple movies with such scenes!).


1

I would eat well when I was a child. I used to eat well when I was a child. Both sentences are correct and have the same meaning. "Would" is used as part of conditional constructions - but not solely there. Its other uses include: The future in the past. So if someone said, "I will be there", then in reported speech this becomes: She said that she ...


1

The phrase "start her job" can refer to her entire period of employment (that is, her getting hired) or her shift for a particular day. The phrase "used to" takes an infinitive, so in the first one, "used to" can't apply to "started". (If you take out "drink tea" and just say "She used to started her job", that would be grammatically incorrect). Since "...


1

It's simpler than that. The first example is the present simple tense. We use the present simple to talk about events with a discrete beginning and end. Contrast that with the second example, which is present perfect. We use the tense in the second example to find out if it has happened or not. With present perfect we are not concerned with when, as is the ...


1

The first sentence asks about something that happened regularly in the not just once. That is the difference to the second sentence. It is about an event that occurred only once. Neither of the sentences imply if you know about him working late now.


1

In your explanation of #1 In #1, it means that when we were children, we rarely got up early, we frequently got up quite late. Now, when we are adults, we usually get up early. "Got up quite late" is additional context which is not implied by your sentence We didn’t use to get up early when we were children. but you are correct that it implies there ...


1

There is a subtle difference, the meaning is similar either way. "Every morning Tom used to kiss Della..." suggests he doesn't any more, that this was in the past, removed from now. On the other hand, "Every morning Tom kissed Della..." may be the story of their lives right now, today. I can explain this as a native speaker, I'm not good with formal ...


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