Hot answers tagged

4

One of the meanings in the dictionary you cited, Merriam-Webster, does fit. It's definition 2e in the entry of land in the verb sense: to complete successfully by landing An example is given as: the skater landed all her jumps The jumps referred to in this example are most likely those of a figure skater, though they may also be skateboarding tricks. ...


3

As with many words, the meaning depends on context. The verb blunder means alternatively: to move in an awkward way I could hear him blundering around in the darkness. to make a (serious) mistake, usually because of not taking care or thinking Police blundered by not releasing more details about the case to focus public interest. In this case, ...


3

Present simple is used for facts and routine: For example: What does he do before work every day? He drinks his coffee. You are not talking about the past, you are making a general statement that is true at any time. There is another use of the simple present: commentary. A sports commentator will tend to use simple present to describe events that ...


3

The word is cock (meaning 12 in the reference)


3

Both of your example sentences are compound sentences. They are each composed of two clauses. One of the clauses is an independent clause, and the other is an introductory "if-clause" which describes a non-real situation. The verbs in the "if-clauses" are in the subjunctive mood: "had crashed" and "were". This is appropriate for hypothetical events. On the ...


2

It's not unusual, but I too am of the opinion that it's often awkward and redundant, as in both your examples. It's fine to use the passive tense with "expect", but there's no need to push it into the future: It is expected to rain tomorrow. Society may change, but gender roles aren't expected to change with it. The only time this ever makes sense ...


2

The exchange -Do you speak German? -I speak it quite well. Is quite grammatical and seems fully natural to me. The use of a pronoun, such as 'it' to refer to a noun or noun phrase in a previous sentence is very common. Without the question, the answer is unclear as the pronoun lacks a referent. Similar exchanges, such as: -Can you play the piano? ...


2

In this situation according to Longman Dictionary applies definition #1, as a verb: blunder, verb 1 [intransitive always + adverb/preposition] to move in an unsteady way, as if you cannot see properly blunder about/around: Someone was blundering about in the kitchen. blunder into/past/through etc something: Phil came blundering down the ...


2

Yes, That works. You can use break, damage, destroy (although that implies quite a bit more damage than just break / damage )


2

Certainly. "Break" can be used for both "cause to stop working" and "smash into pieces". "Break the wall" is quite correct.


1

The short answer is: you can use them; it's likely that you'll be understood; some people will think you don't know English very well. Longer answer: my first instinct is to say, no, those uses are unacceptable. It's true that those verbs are used intransitively, but not in those ways. "He imports" does not mean he is imported, it means he engages in the ...


1

I agree with a comment from sumelic: (The subject agrees with the verb.) Since "Johnny" is the subject, the correct verb would be "is", not "are", even though that may not be immediately obvious. What about these examples? See whether you can fill the gaps: The cars _______ (is/are) red. The colour of the cars _______ (is/are) red. However, it is ...


1

To "land" something means to successfully get or achieve something. For example: Alice landed a great job offer. means that Alice got a great job offer. Similarly, to "land" a trick means that you successfully did whatever it was: jump up, twirl the board around, and then return to the ground without falling. I suspect that the origin of the term in ...


1

Here was my first impression: Q: What are you thinking about? This asks for the particular matter that’s being thought. You don’t really have an idea about the person’s thoughts. A1: Oh, nothing. A2: A friend. A3: How we used to play under the tree by the river when we were kids, remember? It slightly differs from Q: What are you thinking? ...


1

To me, the verb hamper is rather less common, and means specifically to hinder a physical activity, probably not intentionally. So I would not use hamper there. Even hinder is a bit literary: I think most people would say "He made it hard for me to study yesterday", or "he stopped me studying"; or be more specific, eg "He got in the way" or "He distracted ...


1

Generally speaking, you get to a place or you arrive at a place. So, both of the following would be acceptable: ✔ When you have got to the mall . . . ✔ When you have arrived at the mall . . . But the combination of both prepositions isn't used: ✘ When you have got to at the mall . . . ✘ When you have arrived at to the mall . . . The same is true ...


1

To "walk the dog" means to control and handle the dog while it performs bodily functions. That is, make sure it's pee and poop go in acceptable places, stoop-and-scoop after if required, keep the dog from going places that dogs are not permitted, return the dog when these functions are complete, and so forth. By extension, "walk the dog" can mean a human ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible