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3

They are both grammatical, but they normally mean completely different things: to wait on somebodyThis means to serve somebody and attend to their needs.The serving staff at the restaurant had all been trained on the proper way to wait on their hungry customers and get them whatever they wanted. to wait for somebodyThis means to be available and present ...


2

As the comment says, "to commit genocide" is alright. Though Wiktionary uses "genocide" as a verb and offers several examples, it sounds awful. Alternatives that are verbs: slaughter decimate annihilate eliminate exterminate You should check each one in some dictionaries to see if it fits your need.


2

"I was broken" could be interpreted two different ways: with "was" as the copula (the verb to be) in the past tense, and broken as an adjective meaning damaged. as the past tense of the passive construction "to be broken", indicating somebody or something broke the subject, but avoiding mention of who or what did it. "I ...


2

Firstly, the use of "take a bath" as an idiom to mean 'take a financial loss' is not particularly common. I'm a native British English speaker, one who is deeply interested in language and literature, and had never heard it before! I looked it up and you are right, it is in the dictionary, but it is the fourteenth definition, so I wouldn't worry ...


2

The first and third are fine. "Cancelled" is a perfect participle, also called a passive participle. It is used adjectivally in sentences 1 and 2. It is purely terminological preference whether, in sentences 23 and 4, it is described as part of a verb phrase or as a participle used adjectivally. Many will say that sentences 2 and 4 are equally good ...


2

No: none of the items you list are mood forms. Imperative and interrogative are clause types while conditional and subjunctive are constructions, the latter headed by a plain verb form. Infinitival is a type of subordinate clause headed by a plain verb form The term 'mood' is most usually applied to the inflectional systems of the verb, as in the contrast ...


1

"Has gone" is somewhat more idiomatic here. The distinction is that "has gone" only states that the event existed, whereas "went" focuses on the specific day when the event happened. Here are some clearer examples: "What's your fastest time in the mile?" "I've run it as fast as 4:37." "What's your ...


1

The latter is more normal. These is the subject (not what creatures - that is the complement). In a direct question we invert the subject and verb (or auxiliary - irrelevant here): What creatures are these? In an indirect (or embedded) question, we do not invert, so the subject precedes the verb: Who knows what creatures these are?


1

Unfortunately, there is no "right information" that can be definitively pointed to. Depending on who you ask, you'll get a different answer. Some people will list one number, and others will list another. Some people will claim that verbs don't have moods at all. It's similar to asking how many verb tenses there are. From "A Comprehensive ...


1

There's nothing intrinsically wrong with including the word once in a Present Perfect construction. It's just that idiomatically the usage has massively fallen out of favour over the past century. Unlike Past Perfect, which continues to be used as often as ever... (I multiplied the hits for has once been by 4 to better highlight the relative change over ...


1

The present perfect is not possible in this case because it is referred to a single past time. Compare these two sentences: "Celine Dion has sung with Bocelli." "Celine Dion once sang with Bocelli." In sentence 1, we know the action was in the past, but we do not know how many times it happened. In sentence 2, "once" tells us ...


1

In each of these sentences, "got" is simply an informal way of communicating. "I got bored while watching serials" could be said like this: "I became bored while watching serials." "I was bored while watching serials" is grammatically correct, but it does not mean the same thing as "I got bored while watching ...


1

Be ye never is synonymous, exactly, with though ye be never The word "be" is just a contraction of albe, which is a contraction of ALBEIT which mean "though it may be" and is still used, albeit rarely. So at full length it is albeit ye be never ( See eg Spenser Shepheard's calendar) "Albe forswonk and forswot I am" The same form ...


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