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23

Both sentences are grammatically correct. Though neither provides a clear statement of the entire position. It really depends on the context in which you are speaking. If someone for example asks for the result of the disciplinary council considering her case it would seem reasonable to say "She's been banned from tennis for 5 years". However if ...


13

The OP's solution “She has been banned from tennis for three years.” is grammatical but means the length of the ban lasts three years, it does not suggest that there are another two more years to go. It's been three years since she was given a five-year ban in 2018 The five-year ban was (hypothetically) issued in 2018, so the decision is a finished action. ...


9

Even three years after the ban was given, the original sentence is still correct to say. If you want to indicate that three years have passed, then you'd need to do so explicitly. There are many options, such as: Three years ago, she was banned from tennis for five years. She has received a ban from tennis for five years, of which she has served three. She ...


7

The rest is your decision. means that something (or the main part of it) has been already decided (likely, by others) and now it's up to you to settle the rest (what left or remaining; remainder (1)) The decision rests with you. means that you have authority or responsibility, or you are the one who will make that decision (4).


6

"de-perplex" is not a standard word in English. However the "de-" prefix is fairly productive, and this means you can create new words by adding "de-", and those words mean "remove", or "do the opposite" However, when there is an existing word that expresses what you want, you should not create a new one. In ...


2

The clearest way to convey the situation is to use simple past tense, and to state the time period and start date: In 2020, she was banned from tennis for five years. Or Three years ago, she was banned from tennis competition for five years." Present perfect tense (has been doing....) would normally use the -ing verb form. But the sentence in the ...


2

There are two clauses in that sentence, a subordinate one: As the guest accesses previously untouched regions of its virtual address space, and a main one: hardware page faults vector control to the VMM. I've highlighted the verb in each clause. (vector is an unusual verb, probably limited to programming, meaning to redirect control to another part of a ...


2

No, that is not generally considered a complete sentence. It does have a verb ("being"), but that is not enough. A complete sentence should have a subject and a predicate, and the predicate should include a simple predicate. However, "being" in this case is a present participle (you were correct in calling "being tourist attractions&...


2

Yes, certainly. It would mean you examined the place (but more critically, attentively, searchingly - you scrutinised it).


2

Confusing and wrong. If you are sharing a house say "Our house is...". As there is one house it is confusing to refer to it as two things. Although this is sometimes done as trick (see below). No. Two houses so use "are". Better might be "Both our houses are ..." Correct, two women The trick question Elizabeth, Lizzy, Betsy,...


2

I don't think there is one verb that covers the entire action described. I think your best option is to describe the action, for example: He enjoyed the meal so much he made sure to get every last drop, running his finger along the plate for any missed morsels.


1

Either is correct and easily understood, but I believe that "clean" is somewhat more common than "clean off" (at least here in the Northeast U.S.). Also, "finger" would need a determiner. For example: She cleaned the plate with her finger. (Of course, this doesn't indicate that she actually ate the food.)


1

The structure is [This place] Noun phrase, subject of sentence [tops] verb (meaning "be better" or "be more" [it] pronoun, object of verb. [bringing ...] participle phrase, describing how this place "tops it". However the participle phrase is not grammatically correct. To "top" can be used is positive or negative ...


1

This place tops it bringing Japan’s famed hospitality to shame and to the drains. I cannot find reference on the use of to the drains in such context. The author may have wanted to say down the drain, which is described in Collins Dictionary: down the drain PHRASE If you say that something is going down the drain, you mean that it is being destroyed or ...


1

We use infinitives after certain nouns to give more information about nouns. Example: Ken has got the ability to be a great detective. Pensy made a promise to write an article on detectives. For the second one, "proving" is similar to "to prove", but it's far less common used. This kind of grammatical phenomenon is called predicative. ...


1

In this use, it means cost (the verb): Merriam-Webster run 12 b verb: cost (sense 1) rooms that run $50 a night Merriam-Webster cost 1 verb: to require expenditure or payment rooms that run $50 a night (The M-W example is the same for both entries.) A quick check shows that American Heritage Dictionary and Collins also show that sense. It may be hard to ...


1

Remembering something can be voluntary or involuntary (you can remember a bad experience that you would rather forget). To memorise something is to commit it to memory deliberately.


1

You're right that it does have a verb. But your teacher is right that it is not a complete sentence. A complete sentence has a conjugated verb, meaning it has a tense. "Is/are/was/were" are the conjugated forms of "be" along with the present continuous, past perfect, and so on. "Being" is a gerund/participle, and doesn't have a ...


1

Impress can certainly be used in negative ways, though simply disliking someone doesn't seem like it would usually qualify, More like: "His dumb stunts were the stuff of school legend, impressing students and teachers alike. The worst was probably when he mooned the crowd at the baseball game, timing it just right to appear on the Jumbotron."


1

I think it would be unusual to interpret "impressed by" this way. If you were deft and clever enough you might make it work as a speaking topic by structuring your talk so that the hate led you to do something that turned out well. Perhaps that person was a bully who taught you to defend yourself or a stern teacher you hated at the time but in ...


1

I'd have to say no - it doesn't feel right in your context. "Size up" may sound like it literally means to measure something for size - but it is so commonly used as an idiom in a metaphorical sense that it no longer sounds natural when using it the way you suggest. "Sizing up" has come to mean a quick assessment or judgement, usually of ...


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