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4

The verb paid takes objects that are the method of payment: credit cards, cash, seashells, etc. You could say "The money has already been paid." The verb paid for takes objects that are the reason for the payment, in this case the service of repairing and repainting the car: "The service has already been paid for."


2

The verb "evaluate" can be used transitively and intransitively, with related but different meanings. You can say "I evaluate the expression" or "The expression evaluates". The role played by the object in the transitive form is that played by the subject in the intransitive form. In this way the verb "evaluate" is ...


2

No, understand is not a verb I would use there. You say in your final paragraph that the goal is for the situation to be resolved. If you mean you want to reach a final decision and move forward with it, you could say: I will contact you to resolve the situation that happened yesterday. If you mean that you want to determine what happened, you could say “...


1

All is well. This is the accepted form in English grammar. Which one of the following form is correct by this convention: In this context, all is a singular noun = Everything. In Do all dogs bark, all is an adjective/determiner (modifying "dogs") The subject of the sentence is "dogs" - dogs is plural - therefore its verb is in the plural ...


1

Either would be understood, at least in US usage. They can even be stated with "the math lesson" left off, "Do you get this?"/"Are you getting this?"


1

Do you accept "He gave to Sally a ring" as grammatical English? It is not the usual order, but it is understandable. The verb "gave" is transitive. The usual, unmarked order is "He gave a ring to Sally." The unusual order may be preferred to give "end weight" to a long or complex object. Also some sentences that seem ...


1

Either is fine, they both have the same meaning. For the sake of brevity though, I feel "During the holidays, students should revise the topics that they learned in grade 2" is more idiomatic.


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This is wrong, the correct one is I saw him walking. There is a slight difference between I saw him walking and I saw him walk though. You can read this one for the difference.


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First, remember that advice is not countable, so you can't say "an advice". You would normally just say "advice" or "some advice". You compared it with the phrase "ask somebody for something", and that is a good model for the correct sentence: I want to ask you for some advice. I want to ask you for advice about... ...


1

Here's a British dictionary that mentions the intransitive form. And here's the Cambridge dictionary entry, which lists both American and British usage, and specifically mentions that they can be either intransitive and transitive. So no, there isn't a "pondial" difference in this respect, and some British dictionaries appear not to suffer from the ...


1

Voice: You are correct - it is written in active voice. Mood: Also correct - commands are the imperative mood. Tense: Although "click" is the present participle of the verb, imperative statements use the infinitive form of verbs, but omitting the 'to'. An imperative statement can't really be said to be in the 'present' tense, because the action isn'...


1

It's because of the question Did you know..... The questioner is asking whether someone was (has been) aware of Sam's impending marriage. It's equally valid to use is or was in this context. A classical example is that of the round world. He said: "The world is round." Put that into indirect speech and you can use is round or was round. In most ...


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No. In modern English, that use (which is the sole surviving instance of the old subjunctive form of the verb) is used only with wish and with conditionals (if, whether, literary inversion). Older English allowed it with a wider range of verbs, but it has survived only in those two contexts (and not at all for some English speakers).


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"I am finished reading" is a chimaera, a mixture of two valid constructions that results in a sentence that is grammatically odd (and perhaps invalid) "I am finished" is valid. It is formed with an adjective as the complement of "I am". And as a verb, "to finish reading" is correct, so "I have finished reading&...


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