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78

In this scene in the film, Jamie is speaking broken Portuguese. The English subtitles are deliberately also broken to indicate this fact. "Marriage" is always a noun, never a verb. The implication is that Jamie has made a similar error in his Portuguese speech. Furthermore, "with a view of" is a rather awkward way of saying it. "I've come here to ask you to ...


48

It's a figure of speech, known as anthimeria: the use of a word in a part of speech other than its customary usage.* Ordinarily, Frankenstein is a proper noun referring to a fictional monster originally from the 1818 novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and later made into numerous horror movies, most famously a 1931 movie starring Boris Karloff. The movie ...


36

This is called verbing, the practice of using a word, most likely a noun, as a verb. The most effective and popular way to verb is with new/unique/special concepts, as in your example. Frankenstein, as you probably know, is a well-known and well-popularized book by English writer Mary Shelley. Here the author of the ESPN piece uses this cultural reference ...


25

No, it cannot. The use of it in this film is deliberately incorrect. The words are not spoken in English in the original English language version of the film - they are spoken in Portuguese, and the English subtitles are meant to convey the idea that the character is speaking Portuguese badly. I imagine that the comedy effect of this could be lost if the ...


23

Is it a verb? Yes. Is it a new verb? No! The book Frankenstein was published in 1818 and the verb popped up less than 10 years later: I want some Howard Paine to sketch a skeleton of..scenes..and I'd Frankenstein them there. Letters by Charles Lamb, 1827 (via the OED) Even if someone hasn't read the book, most people will know who Frankenstein (more ...


10

I'm surprised that nobody has approached it from this angle, but... Frankenstein is not the name of the monster! In Shelly's original novel Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus, and almost every adaptation since, it is Doctor Frankenstein who created the monster, so the use of "Frankenstein" as a verb here is following the same pattern as to lynch or to ...


6

Both are correct. The verb disappear is frequently used in the present continuous: for example, the title of a recent New York Times article: Independent Hotels Are Disappearing as Chains Grow 1 In this usage, I do not believe disappear is a stative verb. Oxford defines it as disappear (v) cease to be visible. 2 With the example He disappeared ...


6

No. This sense of the "phrasal verb" verb form to take off (= leave) is always intransitive - it can't be linked to an "object", such as the country, without including a preposition (The athlete took off from the starting blocks like a bullet). Note that the same two words can be used as a transitive phrasal verb (with an object, but no preposition) in, say,...


3

"Let us write N for the set of numbers 1,2,3,4..." This looks like standard usage of the words "write" and "for". It makes sense in an ordinary way which doesn't require knowledge of specialized mathematics terminology. Is that acceptable in a mathematics paper? I'd say, probably yes. Here is another example, from https://www.zweigmedia.com/RealWorld/...


2

Both are acceptable. There is a difference in meaning, and that difference is tense. The word "soon" is an adverb, it is modifying the verb phrase "get used to", by telling us when it happens. The first is describing a fact. It is using the simple present to that this is always true. Everybody who moves to a foreign country gets used to it soon after ...


2

The verb is is in a subordinate clause: What's it mean that the review is now a criminal probe? It works like this sentence: Ryan Lucas said that the matter is now a criminal investigation. "That the matter is now a criminal investigation" is the object of "said". The subordinate clause is like a sentence within a sentence. As a whole, it serves as a ...


2

Marry is the verb. Marriage is the noun. Using one for the other is like saying "can you postage a letter?" instead of "can you post a letter" ... "Please replacement my book" instead of "please replace my book".


2

Many sentences without an explicit verb still have an implicit verb—a verb that has merely been elided. Answers to questions often work like this. For example: "What's your name?" "Verena." That is, "My name is Verena." I'm not sure those should count. These sentences, however, really do follow syntactic structures for a full sentence that inherently do not ...


2

Because the movie is wrong; you are correct: "Lie still." This article from Merriam-Webster supports your correct understanding: (bold emphasis added) Lay means "to place something down flat," while lie means "to be in a flat position on a surface." Most native speakers of any language have their common, vernacular errors. Native speakers often get this ...


1

This may help. Suppose the answer to a question is "Yes, they fought." This would have two different meanings for two different questions: Did Joe and Pete fight? Yes, they fought. Did Joe and Pete fight in the war? Yes, they fought. In the first case, Joe and Pete are understood to have fought each other. In the second case, they are understood to ...


1

All of the presented possibilities are possible and reading the sentence in isolation can only leave you to guess which one is correct. The standard implication for both sentences is that the two subjects are doing the action with each other. With surrounding context, however, other meanings could become more likely. There are also other words you could add ...


1

"Match" is acceptable in this context although the far more common verb in the U.S. is "check." Your sentence, however, is not highly idiomatic in other respects. After solving the problems, match your answers with those in the answer key to ensure that your answers are correct is pefectly acceptable, but much less frequent than would be After solving ...


1

Generally, an event or some new information prompts something, for example in this Guardian article: This has prompted concerns that humans might be contaminated by the chemicals used in plastics or the pathogens that ride on the particles. A person or organisation would introduce something, for example this Lonely Planet article: Australian carrier ...


1

There are any number of "sentences" that consist of short exclamations or interjections, and which contain no verb. An easy example of this is a response to a question: A: Is your answer a complete sentence? B: Yes. Now, I can't say whether your teacher will agree that "Yes" is a complete English sentence, but you can always try and see what she says....


1

It is correct, but a little unusual In "I have it learned", the word "learned" is a participle phrase (consisting of just one word". Compare this sentence with "I have it in my hand" (referring to a pencil) or "I have it cooked perfectly" (referring to a pie). The structure of "I have it learned" and "I have it in my hand" are analogous and they ...


1

Because "Frankenstein" (as the monster) is a literary metaphor, this is not really an English language question at all. When used as a verb, the metaphor should have the same potential meaning in any language, at least to those familiar with the reference. Let me give a similar example to illustrate what I mean. Suppose I know a group of three friends, ...


1

All three sentences are grammatically correct and would be understood by an English speaker. The second one is far less common, because it implies focus on the act of opening and closing. If all you're trying to communicate is when the school will be open, use the first or third sentence. If you have a reason to convey exactly when the change happens from ...


1

You can cool on an offer or on an idea: cool v. become or cause to become less hot become or cause to become calm or less excited “He was involved in discussions about turning the Telegraph tabloid but hinted recently that he had cooled on the idea.” (The Guardian, 2004-10-27) However it would be more common to emphasize the change: I ...


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