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22

"Assimilation" can work here: assimilation (n): The absorption and integration of people, ideas, or culture into a wider society or culture. Assimilation is a neutral term for a process that can be expressed either as a positive or a negative. To those in the wider culture, it may seem a good result to see some minority culture integrated into the ...


22

I don't have a simple verb to replace your blank, but consider going native: Fitting in is one thing, but going native is a totally different thing. From the Cambridge Dictionary: go native disapproving or humorous ​If a person who is in a foreign country goes native, they begin to live and/or dress like the people who live there.


7

Following up on a word mentioned by Andrew, you could consider homogenizing. To homogenize something is to make it homogeneous: completely the same throughout, with no parts that are different from one another. It can be done to milk, for instance; all the little bits of fat get mixed in, producing a uniform liquid from which the fat doesn't separate. ...


3

Yes, it is possible and once valid, but this usage has long gone out of use. If you dig into Middle English and Early Modern English texts you might find many examples of similar constructions. It is considered so obsolete that you probably won't even find this usage in major dictionaries. The OED has several relevant entries. To affect or strike with ...


3

1: Harry was supposed to become an earl = It was intended that Harry should become an earl This is a special use of the verb to suppose that only occurs in passive contexts (where the actual "agent" doing the "supposing" is unspecified). But hopefully you can see how the more common meaning to suppose = assume / think / guess stretches through to ...


3

Idioms: to have a long way to go, to go the long way [round something, through something, etc.]. SHORT STORY There was a long way to go before getting to the town. And this was the long way, which had to be gone by us. Because we were determined not to be seen by anybody. END It is grammatical. However, if it were my writing, I would use: And this was ...


3

Either is fine. It depends on the exact circumstances. As your example is written, using "chose" (past tense), this is the implied sequence of events: You (the audience) are going to meet a director This director is going to describe how to produce a play, using, as a model, a play she already produced. As part of this description, the director ...


3

"Is on trial" is the common phrase and perfectly correct. The passive "is put" is odd in the example you give, using the present tense. The verb "put" indicates a single act, but you want to talk about an ongoing state. You could "put" in the past tense: John is on trial for murder John was put on trial for murder three weeks ago.


2

As someone from the west coast of the USA, it doesn't sound right to me. I've never heard 'go' used that way, but this could be perfectly fine in other places. 'Bet' is what I'd use here. However, the phase (do) you wanna go? is a kind of slang for a challenge; a bet that 'you' can't defeat 'me' in whatever activity matches the context. This might be what ...


2

The present perfect continuous is used in various ways, but in this context the expected meaning is "occurring for some time, including right now". (Up to the present moment, and ongoing) Something terrible has been happening to my daughter and her husband. This makes it odd to use with the past tense, because we can't reconcile something known in the ...


2

It would be a very unusual construction. As a native English speaker, it sounds highly unusual. Such sentences are written in the passive voice. "It bothers me" means the thing (it) is doing the action of bothering. For some verbs, such as "bothers" and "amuses," we find it grammatically valid to say they do these actions. It is considered reasonable ...


2

There is no really common single verb for this. Two common expressions are: Lighten the mood. Make a joke of. They are also frequently used together. So: Another guy tried to lighten the mood, and made a joke out of the situation by replying to the whole group that . . .


2

That would be because "be-" is a prefix that is almost always added to verbs and makes nouns and verbs. It means something along the lines of "cause". It is, by no means, a recent one, so you're bound to come across examples where the verb is no longer distinguishable and doesn't exist in modern English, as is the case with "believe". The most common ...


2

Short answer: It (eventually) makes sense, and it's probably grammatically correct. Long answer: It's a terrible sentence that requires multiple readings to comprehend. As you have been told, this passive form of "go", to mean "travel", is rarely (if ever) used. Example: We went the long way. is standard, but: The long way was gone by us. is ...


2

I would suggest the phrase “losing your identity”. While it appears to be going out of style, the US at least has considered assimilation and blending in a good thing. It’s the great melting pot. So, those terms are going to be considered positive by some people. Losing your identity, forgetting where you came from or forgetting your roots, are all seen ...


2

How have... is a question whereas How... is a statement. How have health care monitoring devices helped in changing your life? Is asking the audience to answer. Whereas: How health care monitoring devices have helped in changing your life. Might be the title of the paper in which you discuss the findings.


2

Your meaning will be understood, but that usage is not common. If you're trying to emphasize that you're staying with the person, you could use "stick with." I don't love him at all, but I have to stick with him at least while my children grow up a bit more. If you're trying to emphasize that you haven't found anyone better, you could use "make do with."...


1

It depends on who is in a bad position- the original subject, which you mention is "people", or some new subject. In the first case, you would want to say "They found themselves in a bad position." Notice you are basically duplicating the "them" pronoun twice, once as the subject of the verb "found" and again as its object. In the second case, you would ...


1

You beat someone up. You beat someone up badly. You would not say to someone: Get out of here, or you will get beaten (up) badly [by me]. You would say: Get out of here, or I will beat you up! That is what you tell someone else: He got badly beaten (up) by those guys.


1

"...you should never run out of steam (pursuing such an important goal)." If you run out of steam, you suddenly lose the energy or interest to continue doing what you are doing: David seems to be running out of steam. I decided to paint the bathroom ceiling but ran out of steam halfway through. How To Reach Your Goal When You Are Running Out Of ...


1

"get/getting cold feet" is a rather specific saying, and you probably shouldn't try to extrapolate too much from it. A more natural way to write that last sentence would be: "Don't ever let yourself get cold feet." but I don't think it fits the scenario very well: "cold feet" is more related to avoiding doing something specific. The classic use is prior to ...


1

Because none of the others result in a grammatical sentence. Gilbert Stuart is considered by most art critics that he was greatest portrait painter North America contains. "that he was greatest" does not work, neither does "is considered ... that" Gilbert Stuart is considered by most art critics as he was greatest portrait painter North America ...


1

probably not, but it does depend on context The phrase "has to be" implies 'compulsion' - i.e. that there is a reason for the topic to be interesting. It also may be used of either the present or the future. For example, said of a topic you are studying: I know you chose this topic for your thesis, so this topic has to be interesting for you. is about ...


1

“Drinks” is a plural noun; “drink” would be the singular form. You would say “The drinks at his party were very good.” If something is part of a party, you say it is at the party (not in). Since “drinks” is plural, you use “were”, not “was”. Now that you know “drinks” is plural you should be able to answer the first question. “was” is used for a singular ...


1

I think you actually want to shift the focus here. Forgetting where you came from The issue you want to emphasize is not the joining of the community, but the loss of the values and identity that someone learned in their original culture. In English, we're more explicit about this, since Western culture doesn't generally view adapting to the culture around ...


1

To conform Has there ever been a society which has died of dissent? Several have died of conformity in our lifetime. -- Jacob Bronowski . I think the reward for conformity is everyone likes you but yourself. -- Rita Mae Brown


1

In the case of "I reported him to be safe", he is safe. "To be safe" is an adjectival phrase which modifies 'him'. You could say the same thing like this: "I reported him safe." That might look a little more ambiguous at first, but note that 'safe' is just an adjective--it is performing the exact same grammatical function as 'to be safe' in the original ...


1

Because that is how the English verb "belong" works. There's no particular logic to it: it's just how it is. Languages are as they are, not as somebody thinks they ought to be.


1

Like be used to, be supposed to is an idiom that has become a fixed phrase, and in many speakers' minds and voices, single words -- useta and sposta, with their own individual and very idiomatic syntax. This is new syntax. In both of these constructions, the question of whether it's passive or active is irrelevant, since that's entirely a matter of ...


1

You can still use to come up, there's nothing inherently one-sided to this phrasal verb that the first person can only be the object or something. When everybody was dancing, I came up to her and after greetings started talking to her and fortunately we made quick friends. (note that I have changed 'were' to 'was'; 'everybody' is singular even though it ...


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