Hot answers tagged

80

In this scene in the film, Jamie is speaking broken Portuguese. The English subtitles are deliberately also broken to indicate this fact. "Marriage" is always a noun, never a verb. The implication is that Jamie has made a similar error in his Portuguese speech. Furthermore, "with a view of" is a rather awkward way of saying it. "I've come here to ask you to ...


61

You are confusing "Sever" with "Severe" Severe is definitely used as an adjective. It means: very great; intense. While, sever is a verb which means: divide by cutting or slicing, especially suddenly and forcibly. put an end to (a connection or relationship); break off. In your quote, the word "sever" is used in the Past Participle form, which ...


59

The main idea is that lions does not mean male lions. It means lions. Chickens also mate, and indeed cats. I rarely, if ever, have seen mention of roosters or tomcats mating. Or bulls, stallions or for that matter, bitches, sows or hens. So the assumption that the male word is used is incorrect — the general term for the animal species is used, and in ...


57

No, a "tongue twister" is a sentence that is very difficult to say correctly. For example: She sells seashells on the seashore The sixth sheik's sixth sheep's sick. Which wristwatches are Swiss wristwatches? What the child in the picture is doing is called tongue rolling. See Tongue rolling on Wikipedia for more information.


50

It's a figure of speech, known as anthimeria: the use of a word in a part of speech other than its customary usage.* Ordinarily, Frankenstein is a proper noun referring to a fictional monster originally from the 1818 novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and later made into numerous horror movies, most famously a 1931 movie starring Boris Karloff. The movie ...


46

With the "It's 2018" clause, both mean more or less the same thing (as Neil says). But without that clause to clarify, the implication would be quite different. I still use this phone would be something you say to emphasise the fact that generally-speaking, you still use the phone. If someone suggested you throw the phone away, for instance, you could say "...


43

Technically speaking, only this one is correct: I demand that he/this man leave! The reason why that one is correct while the other one is not has to do with the fact that what we're dealing here with is an example of something called a subjunctive mood. Wikipedia defines subjunctive mood as follows: The subjunctive is a grammatical mood found in many ...


37

Without context (or the pronunciation pattern), it's hard to tell. The sentence is ambiguous - it can very well be both. "You made me like this." with "like" as a verb would mean "You forced me/caused me to enjoy this". For example: - I thought you didn't like eggplant? - You made me like this! Your cooking is amazing! "You made me like this." with "...


37

You stage a coup, like the documentary How to Stage a Coup. to produce or cause to happen for public view or public effect // stage a track meet // stage a hunger strike (source: Merriam-Webster) In cases like this, an NGram search is often helpful. (The * basically means "find the words most used at that position" and _VERB specifies you're ...


37

This is called verbing, the practice of using a word, most likely a noun, as a verb. The most effective and popular way to verb is with new/unique/special concepts, as in your example. Frankenstein, as you probably know, is a well-known and well-popularized book by English writer Mary Shelley. Here the author of the ESPN piece uses this cultural reference ...


32

I think he was generalising what young ibex (plural) do in the face of danger: run to steeper ground. In other words, he wasn't just saying that this particular ibex did that (which it did), but all young ibex (generally) do it.


31

Actually, most of the time it's a male and a female mating… But as far as the grammar is considered: In mixed groups, the gender term is chosen that would be used to talk about the species in general. Therefore you would say: lions mating in Africa cats mating in the alley cattle mating in the field


30

Wait is an intransitive verb—it doesn't take a direct object; consequently it can't be cast into passive voice, and its past participle can't act as an adjective:  We are waiting eagerly. but ✲ We are waiting him. ✲ The event is waited. ✲ His eagerly waited arrival has been delayed. Await is a transitive verb—it does take a direct object. We ...


30

Option B is the correct answer, as your answer key says. The error is in the use of the singular form of the copula "is" with a plural subject. The correct form of the copula is "are" because the sentence in the non-inverted form is: Developing the ability to work with others and developing leadership skills are more important than winning. This is a ...


28

To hear is to physically experience the sense of sound. As long as one's ear and brain are capable of processing sound waves, one can hear. To listen is to deliberately apply the ability to hear. One who listens is thinking about what is heard, what it means, how to respond, and whether to continue to listen/pay attention. Imagine three people seated ...


28

This question has previously been asked and answered on ELU. To summarise, there are three different syntactic constructions for the verb allow... 1: With a gerund complement indicating what is allowed: Mama don't allow no drumming (non-standard English for Mama doesn't allow [any] drumming) Nor does she allow smoking reefers This construction does ...


28

Opinions vary on this one. Here is a quote from Garner's Modern American Usage that explains why it should be didn't used to. It shouldn't be written didn't use to, although this point has stirred up controversy among usage pundits. The argument goes that didn't supplies the past tense, and the main verb that follows should be in the present ...


27

We tried, but the window couldn't be opened. It was painted shut. It was painted to a "shut condition". The process of painting the window resulted in it being shut. The paint got in the gaps between the frames and glued the frames together. So, in order to open the window, you need first to get all the paint out of all the clearances. Here's another ...


26

If you simply want to say how big a file is, then is is fine. This video is 770 megabytes If you want to emphasize how much space it is taking up, you can use occupy in the sense fill, exist in, or use a place This video will occupy most of the free space on my phone.


26

What you're looking for is sand. Merriam-Webster defines this verb as: to smooth or dress by grinding or rubbing with an abrasive (as sandpaper) So in an example sentence like "You should use sandpaper on that block," it would be: You should sand that block.


26

I demand that he leave! I demand that he leaves! These are both examples of what are known as ᴍᴀɴᴅᴀᴛɪᴠᴇ ᴄᴏɴsᴛʀᴜᴄᴛɪᴏɴs. Sentences such as example (1) are known as sᴜʙᴊᴜɴᴄᴛɪᴠᴇ ᴍᴀɴᴅᴀᴛɪᴠᴇs. Examples such as (2) are known as ᴄᴏᴠᴇʀᴛ ᴍᴀɴᴅᴀᴛɪᴠᴇs. There is a third type of mandative called a sʜᴏᴜʟᴅ-ᴍᴀɴᴅᴀᴛɪᴠᴇ. Mandative constructions use a content clause which ...


25

You're looking for unfriend. unfriend to remove (someone) from a list of designated friends on a person's social networking Web site And apparently, defriend works too. defriend unfriend I've also heard people use the words delete and remove. I deleted him from (my) Facebook/my friends list. I removed him from (my) Facebook/my friends list. All ...


25

In this context, "cherry-picking" is a very negative term. This meaning comes from statistical analysis. The term is idiomatic and informal. It is not as negative as accusing someone of lying, but it strongly implies that they do not care whether they mislead. Suppose you are writing an article about a sports team. The team won its first game, lost its ...


25

No, it cannot. The use of it in this film is deliberately incorrect. The words are not spoken in English in the original English language version of the film - they are spoken in Portuguese, and the English subtitles are meant to convey the idea that the character is speaking Portuguese badly. I imagine that the comedy effect of this could be lost if the ...


24

Is it a verb? Yes. Is it a new verb? No! The book Frankenstein was published in 1818 and the verb popped up less than 10 years later: I want some Howard Paine to sketch a skeleton of..scenes..and I'd Frankenstein them there. Letters by Charles Lamb, 1827 (via the OED) Even if someone hasn't read the book, most people will know who Frankenstein (more ...


22

I don't have a simple verb to replace your blank, but consider going native: Fitting in is one thing, but going native is a totally different thing. From the Cambridge Dictionary: go native disapproving or humorous ​If a person who is in a foreign country goes native, they begin to live and/or dress like the people who live there.


21

"Assimilation" can work here: assimilation (n): The absorption and integration of people, ideas, or culture into a wider society or culture. Assimilation is a neutral term for a process that can be expressed either as a positive or a negative. To those in the wider culture, it may seem a good result to see some minority culture integrated into the ...


20

If you put an opposite word of an adverb, it does not convert the word into the opposite meaning. slow down cannot be turned into slow up to mean faster! The word you may use is flared which means widening up. Though it has limited usage and may not suit to your concern.


20

The word "open" here is NOT a verb. "To swing something open" is a verb phrase. In your case. it means he swings the plastic strip in a way that it makes the plastic strip open. To swing is the main verb, and open is the state the plastic strip is in after the action of swinging it.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible