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80

In this scene in the film, Jamie is speaking broken Portuguese. The English subtitles are deliberately also broken to indicate this fact. "Marriage" is always a noun, never a verb. The implication is that Jamie has made a similar error in his Portuguese speech. Furthermore, "with a view of" is a rather awkward way of saying it. "I've come here to ask you to ...


50

It's a figure of speech, known as anthimeria: the use of a word in a part of speech other than its customary usage.* Ordinarily, Frankenstein is a proper noun referring to a fictional monster originally from the 1818 novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and later made into numerous horror movies, most famously a 1931 movie starring Boris Karloff. The movie ...


37

You stage a coup, like the documentary How to Stage a Coup. to produce or cause to happen for public view or public effect // stage a track meet // stage a hunger strike (source: Merriam-Webster) In cases like this, an NGram search is often helpful. (The * basically means "find the words most used at that position" and _VERB specifies you're ...


37

This is called verbing, the practice of using a word, most likely a noun, as a verb. The most effective and popular way to verb is with new/unique/special concepts, as in your example. Frankenstein, as you probably know, is a well-known and well-popularized book by English writer Mary Shelley. Here the author of the ESPN piece uses this cultural reference ...


25

No, it cannot. The use of it in this film is deliberately incorrect. The words are not spoken in English in the original English language version of the film - they are spoken in Portuguese, and the English subtitles are meant to convey the idea that the character is speaking Portuguese badly. I imagine that the comedy effect of this could be lost if the ...


24

Is it a verb? Yes. Is it a new verb? No! The book Frankenstein was published in 1818 and the verb popped up less than 10 years later: I want some Howard Paine to sketch a skeleton of..scenes..and I'd Frankenstein them there. Letters by Charles Lamb, 1827 (via the OED) Even if someone hasn't read the book, most people will know who Frankenstein (more ...


22

I don't have a simple verb to replace your blank, but consider going native: Fitting in is one thing, but going native is a totally different thing. From the Cambridge Dictionary: go native disapproving or humorous ​If a person who is in a foreign country goes native, they begin to live and/or dress like the people who live there.


21

"Assimilation" can work here: assimilation (n): The absorption and integration of people, ideas, or culture into a wider society or culture. Assimilation is a neutral term for a process that can be expressed either as a positive or a negative. To those in the wider culture, it may seem a good result to see some minority culture integrated into the ...


20

The word "open" here is NOT a verb. "To swing something open" is a verb phrase. In your case. it means he swings the plastic strip in a way that it makes the plastic strip open. To swing is the main verb, and open is the state the plastic strip is in after the action of swinging it.


16

To be pedantic means to be excessively concerned with minor details. "Splitting hairs" is a kind of pedantry, but more specific. It is used when someone focuses on a minute difference between two things. Example of pedantic: Person 1: This record is from the 1980s. Person 2: Actually it was originally released in 1979 and then re-released in 1981 so ...


12

Your usage is incorrect. If you mean that you are aware of something, or understand something, then "I know" is correct, and "I'm know" is incorrect. The following examples are correct: I know that you will be a great addition to the team. I am confident that you will be a great addition to the team. If you mean that other people know you, then "I'm ...


12

While the term stage in Glorfindel's answer is widely applicable, it implies primarily the planning and preparation for a coup and not necessarily success. Less common but used to refer specifically to the actions involved to carry out the plan is execute a coup, which does imply success. M-W: to carry out fully : put completely into effect // ...


10

That might've been a typo. It sounds very odd to me. both of your examples are perfectly fine and correct. "is not focused on" or "is not focusing on".


10

To shout over something means to shout more loudly than something. They simplest sentence for that meaning would be "They shouted over the radio", which means that the two people had to shout to be louder than the sound of the radio. In your context that means the radio is loud, they have to shout to hear each other, and they enjoy all the noise. The ...


9

I'm surprised that nobody has approached it from this angle, but... Frankenstein is not the name of the monster! In Shelly's original novel Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus, and almost every adaptation since, it is Doctor Frankenstein who created the monster, so the use of "Frankenstein" as a verb here is following the same pattern as to lynch or to ...


8

As you say sit at an exam is not idiomatic. You can sit an exam (special meaning of "sit", transitive); or you can sit at a table (normal meaning of "sit"; normal locative meaning of "at"). But appear doesn't take a direct object, or have any particular requirement in terms of preposition: it can be used with any static locative preposition: "in", "on", "...


7

Following up on a word mentioned by Andrew, you could consider homogenizing. To homogenize something is to make it homogeneous: completely the same throughout, with no parts that are different from one another. It can be done to milk, for instance; all the little bits of fat get mixed in, producing a uniform liquid from which the fat doesn't separate. ...


7

Many non-ferrous metallic alloys contain this element: bronze, brass, etc. Many non-ferrous metallic alloys contain these elements: bronze, brass, etc. The two sentences have different meanings altogether. Many non-ferrous metallic alloys contain this element: bronze, brass, etc. This implies that bronze, brass etc contain the element ...


6

You’re right, that’s not standard English, and both your corrections sound good, depending on the context. I would assume someone made a typo or doesn’t understand when to use participles in English. If it is the latter, I have seen a lot of native speakers make similar mistakes, like “It is suppose to”. Maybe it’s because when speaking, a “t” sound ...


6

The usual simple past (preterite) and past participle of gaslight in that sense is gaslighted. See https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gaslight and https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/gaslight for examples.


6

Yes, the reasoning is correct. In asking whether Mr. ABC replies to your messages, Does Mr. ABC reply to your messages? asks whether Mr. ABC will reply to messages based on past experience. This is similar to asking, "If you leave a message, will he reply?" Compared to Did Mr. ABC reply to your messages? which is asking whether Mr. ABC has replied ...


6

Another possibility is to orchestrate a coup. or‧ches‧trate /ˈɔːkəstreɪt $ ˈɔːr-/ verb [transitive] (written) to organize an important event or a complicated plan, especially secretly Example: The riots were orchestrated by anti-government forces. (Source: Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English)


6

No. This sense of the "phrasal verb" verb form to take off (= leave) is always intransitive - it can't be linked to an "object", such as the country, without including a preposition (The athlete took off from the starting blocks like a bullet). Note that the same two words can be used as a transitive phrasal verb (with an object, but no preposition) in, say,...


6

Both are correct. The verb disappear is frequently used in the present continuous: for example, the title of a recent New York Times article: Independent Hotels Are Disappearing as Chains Grow 1 In this usage, I do not believe disappear is a stative verb. Oxford defines it as disappear (v) cease to be visible. 2 With the example He disappeared ...


5

For the noun board the correct tense of verb "to focus" would be focuses or does not focus for the present. So you are correct in that is not focus is incorrect. Both of your examples sound correct.


5

Most likely the correct should be "does not focus on" if we are speaking about focus in general, or "is not focusing on" if this it taking place for a period of time. You could also say "is not focused on" if you convey a present situation likely to change. In my opinion, it has a slight "yet" to it.


5

In most cases, I'd agree. Though take the first sentence, to "figure out" a problem. To me, this implies that you are wanting help to solve the problem. If instead you said you were trying to "grasp" the problem, it sounds more like you are trying to understand the problem, let alone solve it. Also, I wouldn't usually expect to hear someone request help to ...


5

"I'm know" is definitely incorrect. A Google search shows it's mostly used by non-native speakers, especially Spanish and Russian native speakers. It also comes up as the title of one or two songs. Breaking the contraction down, you have "I am know." Both "am" and "know" are verbs, and neither are used as "helping" verbs. Only one of the verbs should be ...


5

"Mount" is an alternative to "stage" stage/lead/mount a coup Macmillan Dictionary stage/mount/launch a coup Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English to stage/mount a coup Oxford Learner's Dictionaries: English It is considerably less common on Google Ngrams though.


5

"I climbed the ladder and tried to grab the fruit." is correct. That sentence is composed of two parts, and each part can be turned into a sentence by itself: "I climbed the ladder." "I tried to grab the fruit." If you are talking about the past, both sentences need to be in the past tense, and when you connect them with "and", both verbs should ...


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