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2

In relative , noun or adverbial clauses we often face these kinds of sentences. E.g “Who I am is not important.


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@userr2684291 said: It's true that when you insert an indefinite article we're talking about a noun, but it's a countable noun (and thus arguably a different word). So a better test, in my opinion, would be to try to insert an adjective/adverb. In this case, with the help of the iWeb corpus, I wasn't able to find any adverbs, but I was able to find a ...


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It's a special form of "to be" used in counterfactual clauses. That is when what you are saying isn't true: my heart is not a ball. Here is a reference to that use: Wikipedia "use of the past subjunctive" "The main use of the past subjunctive form, were, which is also known as the irrealis is in counterfactual if clauses." Another reference discusses the ...


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It all depends on the way you define what sentence means in your context. If you mean the string between two periods, then yes, a sentence can have an arbitrary number of conjugated verbs, and hence is and are in one sentence are allowed. For example: The weather is fine and all people are happy. If you consider a sentence to be the part containing ...


55

When in doubt, I find it helpful to simplify the sentence. Consider these: The conclusion is uncertain. The conclusion is final. The conclusion is X. Clearly, whatever the conclusion is, it's singular and needs a singular verb. Now let's look at what the actual conclusion is: Both are harmful. Again, clearly, "both" refers to two things and ...


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Some more context would help. Usually, it's "expect .... from" or "expect of" if you mean something the other person should do or provide. If you mean that you expect the same thing to happen to someone else, it could be "expect for". Example sentences: "I expect more context information from you." "I expect good answers for you with more context."


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I don't know whether it's what you are looking for, but they are examples of tautology - saying the same thing twice in different ways - which is an error. If you refer to glueing something, it's superfluous to add 'with glue'; to juice something is, by definition, 'to obtain juice'.


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First 3 sentences: rest as Noun: replace it by/with 'X'/'something'.. Ok means N, not ok means V. Can't use art. 'a' before as it's uncountable here. 'To' z prep. , NOT used here as part of to+ infinitive Last two Sentences: rest V as transitive verb. Rest what? Another horse. Apply this principle to first 3S, rest, what?. No ans, so not trans. V. So this ...


7

The usual place for an adverb like still is after the first auxiliary verb, so your feeling is correct. However, adverbs can go in many places, and right before the verb phrase is also OK, if perhaps not as common. Probably this is about the necessities for making tests rather than English grammar. If the test constructor hadn't put the still before the ...


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It depends entirely on the requirements of the particular head-word (which are unpredictable, and just have to be learnt). Afraid can take an "of" phrase (consisting of "of" + noun phrase), or it can take a "that" clause. but "of" cannot take a "that" clause. So your second example is grammatical, but your first is not. (I am afraid of the possibility that ...


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To expand on stevekeiretsu's answer, "abstract" needs a subject, and with your current wording, the only one available is the interrogative pronoun "what". That leaves "to" without an object. And you're a bit ambiguous whether you're abstracting the number of apples or the apples themselves. The former can be handled just with the existing object type of ...


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No difference. However 'talk together' is more grammatically correct. The reason is you are already together, so 'with' (meaning 'in a group') is unnecessary.


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Grammatically speaking - the verb needs a subject. What Java object type would you abstract the number of apples to? Alternatively you can put it in the passive voice: What Java object type would the number of apples be abstracted to? On more of a technical level, I probably wouldn't use abstract for assigning a simple count of the number of objects, ...


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To join in is a "phrasal verb" meaning (and syntactically equivalent to) to participate. And since we need to include a preposition anyway in, for example, I will participate in the conversation, if we directly replace participate by join in, we arrive at the superficially "curious" repetition... 1: I will join in in the conversation - my example 2: ...


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If you speak to your parents, you address them directly. If you speak of them, you say something about them, possibly in their absence.


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Use 'to' when describing an action perpetrated on someone. In simple words, 'to' can be used to talk about someone's behaviour towards someone else. For example: He is rude to me. She was rude to Alex. John is always polite to everyone. 'Of' is used after an adjective when judging someone's behaviour. Belonging to someone/ something; relating to someone/ ...


1

It's a matter of perspective. When you use was, you're looking back on the trip. When you use has been, you're looking at the trip from the present. Suppose you're talking to someone about a trip you took to Europe last year. You'd say: It was a nice trip. Now suppose it's the last day of your trip to Europe, and you're talking to your travel partner:...


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'To top [someone]' is British English slang for 'to kill/murder [someone]'. A others have noted, he use of the words 'bloody' and 'git' make it abundantly clear we're dealing with an attempt at British English dialect. A 'git' is an unpleasant person. It was quite old-fashioned and mildly offensive - the sort of thing my dad said in the 1970s, along with '...


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It would be a most unusual way of expressing things. It's people/passengers/travellers/individuals who ride up and down in buses rather than the buses themselves that ride. Cars and buses conventionally travel/drive/hurry/move/pass (and many more) up and down. However, it would not be unusual, after test driving a vehicle with heavy suspension or steering,...


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I count six verbs there. 1) "that's" (= that is), 2) "is", 3) "were hired", 4) "to stand", 5) "tell", 6) "shouted". The sentence is grammatical except that there should be an opening quotation mark to pair with the one after "lies". The many verbs are due to the complex structure.


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That’s not correct. If you “have been Xed” then someone else is doing the X and you are the recipient. For example, I have been released from my obligation. But completing a degree is something that you do yourself, so the phrase is I graduated University XYZ with a degree in ABC Of course, since the University is doing the awarding, you could say I ...


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That would be a good reply to a question: How do you usually get to the library? answer: I like going by bus. or what's your favorite way to get to the shopping mall? answer: I like going by bus. So, it's a valid answer... However, would it make sense to say that, out of the blue, without mentioning any destination? Probably what ...


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The example text in your thread title doesn't make sense, so it isn't answerable. Try a complete sentence, please. Ok, Daniil, you've clarified in the comments that you started from the phrase "What about the pictures?" This is a valid expression in English, but it is technically a sentence fragment, and doesn't have a verb. You shouldn't insert either "is" ...


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