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2 votes

'to+verb' vs 'to+be+verb-ing'

Google Books has just four legible matches for the continuous verb form... Time for me to be hitting the [hay / sack / road / ...] ...compared to at least dozens of matches for the plain infinitive ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
2 votes

'to+verb' vs 'to+be+verb-ing'

With action verbs: I go to school in Miami. [present simple] I'm going to school in Miami. [present progressive as future or present situation] I'd like to go to school in Miami. I'd like to be ...
Lambie's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

"She nods for him to open the box full of butter biscuits"

This is not an idiom. In English cultures a "nod" (moving the head down and up) is the body language sign for "Yes". The word "for" can indicate a purpose. The purpose ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
3 votes

Is this subject/verb agreement correct?

dumb old you is the subject of the sentence and it's third person. Dumb old you wants to do that. A man wants to do that. Just add: you are insane if Only object pronouns with a modifier can be a ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 45.7k
5 votes

Is this subject/verb agreement correct?

Using you with an attributive adjective (which is to say an adjective in front of it) is generally interpreted to create a third-person reference to the listener (or reader). The same goes for me. ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
3 votes

What does "sweeping classical music" mean?

I would say the closest synonym here is "expansive". (Collins entry) Music described as sweeping is expansive, large, epic. Such an effect might be achieved by a large orchestra producing a ...
nschneid's user avatar
  • 5,131
0 votes

Verb "to convict" with prepositions

People are convicted of crimes, and they are convicted on charges. So, both of the following are incorrect: *The man was convicted on fraud. * The man was convicted of charges of fraud. The "...
Mark Foskey's user avatar
  • 3,201
3 votes

Verb "to convict" with prepositions

He was convicted of fraud "of" is followed by the actual crime that was committed. He was convicted on charges of fraud. He was convicted on fraud charges. "on" is followed by ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
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