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Facts are usually expressed with the present tense: A body in free-fall accelerates at 9.8 m/s² But when you describe a particular experiment you would use the past tense: The stone was dropped and accelerated at 9.8 m/s². So you should decide if you are describing a general fact about the machine The machine generates a field in which N particles have ...


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Facts are often stated in present tense just like news, for example: "Breaking News, Blue team defeats Red team by one goal". And when you get to it, you find out that the event took place hours ago. I have seen such mix-ups, but I know there was a grammar for it. I had some friends who studied English translation and they told me that. I guess the ...


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It's both. She is crying for help. In the above, "is" is a finite verb because it is conjugated in agreement with the third-person singular subject "she" and is conjugated in the present tense. In the above, "is" is also a helping verb, helping the main verb "crying." When "is" (or the verb "be") ...


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"Get out of bed" Is a normal way of saying it. Nothing unusual. "climb out" of bed indicates it was hard to do. examples: When I finally climbed out of bed, it was already 2pm I got out of bed at 9am yesterday


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Did it take you a long time to wait for us yesterday? It is grammatically correct, but it is not idiomatic. I would not expect a person to say this sentence, I would expect them to say Did you wait for us a long time, yesterday? It is far more natural to have a person be the subject instead of "it". This also makes the verb shift from "to ...


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She imagined herself sitting on the bench and reading. Yes, it is an action verb. She imagined herself being rich. Yes, it is an adjective. Now, do you "need" being with the adjective? Let's just put it this way. It is more elegant as in English we'd talk about being rich or being poor or being smart, etc. So, in a sense, it is incomplete without ...


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Or maybe "dis" to dismiss, to be dismissive, or maybe "ig" to ignore. I heard "ig" occasionally in the 1980s, along with "igged" as the past tense and "igging" as the gerund form.


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If there were a word you could use in response to someone like 'OK' or 'alright' that had an inherent meaning of disinterest then nobody would use it, otherwise it would confirm they were disinterested. Really, any word can be said in a disinterested, indifferent manner - like the examples you mentioned of "okay", or "alright". The ...


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It does sound awkward. An equivalent would be "while continuing to regulate the position of the actuator". If you don't need the emphasis provided by "continuing to regulate", you could just drop it: "while regulating the position of the actuator".


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the surprising secret to speaking with confidence In this phrase, speaking functions as a noun and is called a gerund. gerund noun [ C ] LANGUAGE specialized UK /ˈdʒer.ənd/ US /ˈdʒer.ənd/ C1 a word ending in "-ing" that is made from a verb and used like a noun: In the sentence "Everyone enjoyed Tyler's singing", the word "...


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"To" in this construction is a preposition, not part of the infinitive of the verb. In fact the verb "speak" is not a verb at all here, but a gerund. The construction is The secret to noun, with "to" meaning "of." Thus: The secret to math. The secret to happiness. The secret to speaking with confidence.


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The rule is that a linking verb agrees with the subject, not the noun complement. This construction is rare but grammatical because most of the time the complement is singular or plural like the subject. In this case, because the "molds" is the closest noun to the verb, the verb agrees with it and not with the "mold" that it is joined to ...


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It's a very small difference. Either will be fine in either situation, but "was" puts more emphasis on the fact that you've talked about it before. In the second set, it actually creates that implication. Compare: I wanted to ask what you think. I wanted to ask what you thought. The past tense "thought" here implies "...at the ...


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You use "is" for the present tense. Typically when the guy or the cars are still with you. You use "was" for the past tense. Typically when the guy (or cars) was with you but has now gone. So you have been telling your friend about a guy. On the street you see the guy and you point him out to your friend and say "He is..." Or ...


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Yes, "persuade or promote". But the use here seems unorthodox. Typically the object of the verb is the concept that you are trying to suggest. She pitched her idea to me over a business lunch. The standard form would be ... pitches the opportunity to save lives as well as improve the United States’ global image, battered during the Donald Trump ...


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"Obtain" or "acquire" suggest you get the test tube, that contains the vaccine. It doesn't suggest that you are inoculated with that vaccine. So you might say "France has obtained/acquired the new flu vaccine from Poland." or "My doctor has obtained 50 flu shots from the health service, and is offering them to the over-...


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It is not very idiomatic. I'd read it as saying that Bhagwant Singh was afraid that he would have to dismantle his fort if he resisted the Company forces. So he surrendered without a fight. This assumes the author has used some non-idomatic phrasing. It is possible that the author intended to say that Bhagwant Singh was frightened into dismantling his fort (...


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"Shew" is just an archaic form (archaic spelling) of "show". I gather the previous respondent has not read the King James Bible, Shakespeare (in the original spelling), and other sources older than the 18th century. Which is not a criticism, because few people do nowadays. But you can also find it in dictionaries. Full disclosure: I have ...


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"Subject-verb" is not a technical term in grammar or linguistics. It's a term some teacher used to mean whatever verb or auxiliary the subject is thought to agree with. So forget about that term, please. The question as posed Which verb defines the tense of a sentence? has no answer, because it's improperly phrased. Sentences do not have a ...


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needs The tense of a sentence is determined by the tense of the verb in the main clause's subject-verb. The main clause's subject-verb is "John needs," "John" being the subject and "needs" being the verb. Since "needs" is present tense, the tense of the sentence is present tense. Additional Notes: You state in your ...


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They're both correct. We sometimes use would to "soften" a request, command, or statement, or make it more polite. For example, I want some water. : I would like some water. Hand me that book. : Would you hand me that book? References: The Many Uses of 'Would' in Everyday Speech, Part 1 WOULD | Grammar | EnglishClub


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This is a good question that does not have a good answer. Both the examples you cite will be understood by mathematicians and their students. Both are ugly. I won't venture to assert that either is wrong or right. When in a textbooks or on an exam you are asked to simplify some mathematical expression it's usually assumed that you know the form expected for ...


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The verb BE is a linking verb or copula. The subject of your sentence It can be you, him, or her is the dummy it. The highlighted pronouns in your sentence are Subject complements.


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"Wants...that..." is a rare, possibly dialectal usage that would sound wrong to a lot of a native speakers. The Oxford English Dictionary has a number of examples of the type "She wants (that) she should be respected" (both with and without "that"). Note that all but one of the OED's examples use the modal "should". (...


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The "agreement was reached" is the correct meaning in this example. There are some cases where "struck" would mean blocked but this is not such a use. For example, "The parties struck off negotiations" would have the meaning that negotiations ceased (for whatever reason).


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Short answer: the phrase, "In Geneva, a historic deal is struck" means: some people successfully make a very important agreement in Geneva. Strike is one of those seemingly simple verbs that actually has very many meanings, some of them quite different from others. Look at this entry in the Merriam-Webster dictionary: https://www.merriam-webster....


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I think you are confusing two different uses of the word "is" here. This verb can either be: The primary verb in the sentence, expressing an attribute or state of being ("My friend is married") An auxiliary used with another verb to form various verb tenses, such as the present progressive tense ("My friend is getting married")...


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Both sentences are grammatically correct but they mean different things. Organizers have been intent on ensuring they go ahead in July They have been very focused on this goal. They are putting all their efforts toward ensuring they go ahead in July, and have not been working on much (or anything) else. Organizers have been intending to ensure they go ...


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The sentence as given is correct, and the past participle is the correct form. The first part of the sentence could be approximately rephrased "She had figured us out". The rule you are referring to applies to a different situation, something like "She had us figure out the answer". In this second case us/we are doing the figuring - ...


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Usable grammar: Causative have or get have + object + past participle Using have or get this way is called causative: I had my hair cut. She got the work done. We have our house cleaned every week. They had us figured out. They had us figured out. = declarative simple past tense. Did they have us figured out? = interrogative simple past tense. The past ...


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The base form of 'have' is correct after 'did'. To 'have something or someone figured out' is a complete verb phrase, and you don't alter 'figured'.


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Till what time of the day does the registration remain open? The rule is very simple. With the auxiliary verb "do", the main verb always takes the bare infinitive. There is never any exception to this rule. Do you remain? Does he remain. We did remain.


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First of all, I am impressed you are writing a thesis in a second language. Google docs suggested that you use "can originate" because the "be" sounds awkward to native speakers. It is not necessary. Honestly I can't give you the exact grammatical reason, but it doesn't sound right. Good luck on the rest of your paper!


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In this case the suggestion from Google docs is a good one. "Can be originated" is grammatically correct (or almost so, and understandable) but awkard and ugly.


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Here, the 's' is a conjugation of the verb as third person, present tense. The verb in the sentence is "does remain", a combination of an auxiliary verb and a main verb. You never duplicate the conjugation of a verb, so in your sentence, "remain" is the correct form. If I may make a phrasing suggestion, "till what time of day" ...


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