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I don’t see anything wrong with sentences 1 and 2. For sentence 3, I might say The drawing shows the position of the bed in the room. In this context, the use of “arrangement” is normally used to mean the relative positions of multiple objects. For example, you can arrange pillows on a sofa, but you don’t “arrange” one sofa in a room. On the other hand, if ...


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No, this sentence is not OK as it is. The things you want to create can only be complete[d] when pigs fly or The things you want to create will only be complete when pigs fly Are both grammaticaly correct, but not idiomatic. Also, they have slightly different meanings. Neither option conveys the meaning of incredulity that you likely wish to evoke. ...


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For the first example it nearly always must be a noun in that position. The article "the" is followed by a noun phrase. If the noun phrase consists of just one word, that word must be a noun. It might be possible to create some artificial sentences with an adverbial "the": The more carrots he eats, the better can he see! Now, in this sentence "the" isn't ...


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To have [pp] is simply the past infinitive. Despite what people have said in other answers, it is not necessarily semantically "perfect": though it resembles the present perfect in syntax, it is simply past in meaning. So I'm happy to be invited by him. non-past (present or future) I'm happy to have been invited by him. past. I would have liked ...


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You're the weakest link, goodbye! Seriously, to eliminate is the one which springs to my mind: to remove from further competition by defeating // the team was eliminated in the first round of the playoffs (source: Merriam-Webster) "You've been eliminated." would be a normal phrase to say to such a candidate. It's as neutral as far as can be in this ...


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It's pretty common to say someone or a team is "eliminated" when they are removed from a competition before the final event. For example a basketball team that loses in an early round of a multi-round tournament is "eliminated". (And we even call this kind of tournament a "single-elimination" tournament) This can also apply in a game show if contestants ...


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"For instance, the boy's parents die in a car crash, the grandmother's missing thumb is mentioned with a description of how it might have been removed, an account of children being turned into various strange objects by witches is given, appearances of the witches are described, cruelty in the school is depicted, and so on." Notice that in each place there,...


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If you want to express all the details described in the paragraph, there is no way that you can do that in one sentence. If you say "I was considered to have completed my part." It just means that "Someone has the opinion that I have completed my part". It can't mean all the details about teams and teachers. The incomplete sentence "Thanks to my team" ...


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It sounds like you're looking for dictionary definitions of the verb drop. Merriam Webster or other sources would be a good place to start. To make something fall to the ground is an example of the second definition: 2a(1): to fall (see FALL entry 1 sense 1a) unexpectedly or suddenly To stop working on task is an example of the fourth definition: 4a:...


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The definition of attain is: To reach or succeed in getting something. Example: He has attained the highest grade in his music exams. The definition of achieve is: To succeed in finishing something or reaching an aim, especially after a lot of work or effort Example: The government's training policy, he claimed, was achieving its objectives. You can take ...


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I'm taking a guess at the context, but it mentions an "app" (computer application), and "adoption" of a software system means that someone or a company begins using it. The first people who buy into, or begin using an application are often called "early adopters". In this context, "merit" means the quality of being particularly good or worthy. What the ...


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Only one is correct, and that would be What is this game called? Since does is a "helping" verb to an other existing verb in the sentence, there is just no place for it in here. For example, What do you call this game? There needs to be some sort of "helping" verb in order for you to construct said question. Omitting that, you would not be able to ...


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Only the last sentence is gramatically correct. However, it does not make actual sense, because a department can not "be" $500. A department is a department. Currency is currency. So, a department cannot be currency, which you have stated that it is in your third sentence.


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There are two main things to point out initially: The correct spelling is "debt". You have this right only once, so I'm guessing you have some confusion around this. Perhaps it will help you in remembering to consider that the word "debt" is related to the word "debit". You need to use "appears", as opposed to "appear", as we are speaking in a singular ...


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You do understand, I hope, that "I'm" is simply a contraction of "I am" and represents absolutely no difference in meaning, grammar, or comprehensibility. It is true that that the use of contractions is frowned upon in formal writing, but there is no valid argument that contractions are not grammatical and idiomatic. I sent them an email and am waiting to ...


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In writing this up I'm coming to realize that I think this is basically the same thing as what @BadZen already answered, but it took me a couple of readings of that answer to realize exactly what it was saying, so I'll add this additional answer in here in case it helps clarify things for anyone else There is actually some ambiguity here, because the phrase ...


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There are two senses that we can interpret the re- prefix here; it is a morphological ambiguity. re- definitely indicates that something is returning to a previous state or occurring again. But what? The problem is that alignment has two different denotations, both of which may apply in this sentence and mean the same thing! 1) alignment: one's ...


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I'm not sure whether there is an explicit grammatical rule which prohibits the phrase "I'm sad with it", but I will point out that I think the main reason why it does not seem right to most people is because you're actually using the wrong word there. In the phrase "I'm happy with it", the word "happy" here is not used in the sense of "joyful", but instead ...


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The auxiliary verb-full verb distinction is important. However the distinction between light verbs and full verbs must also be observed. Consider your question, i.e., Positive statement: I do. Question statement: Do I? or Do I do? In question statement which is the correct form? In order to answer this correctly it is critical to distinguish ...


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The question seems to be whether the perfective aspect (completion) is involved in the above examples. The short answer is no. About Concern. Generally concern is stative. This is addressed in at least one question already: Correct use of stative verbs In statements about the condition of the mind, concern is more a description of state than it is an ...


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Yes, you have it right. "Do that work" is separate and distinct from the other "do" in the sentence. They just happen to be the same verb in this example. It could just as easily be: Do I go to the store?


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Yes, they have similar meanings here too. a) This festival is celebrated every year. "Celebrated" references the moment after the celebrations are complete; it's a projection to future points in time b) You will be accompanied by security. This again references a future point in time. Security will accompany you, and following that, the accompaniment ...


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Neither. It's talking about cost in the sense of money or effort.


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"Say" would be more common than "speak". It would depend on the context, but I can imagine something like: I'd like to share the first two paragraphs from the speech. Or perhaps something like this would be appropriate in certain contexts: I'd like to recite the first two paragraphs from the speech.


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Because the movie is wrong; you are correct: "Lie still." This article from Merriam-Webster supports your correct understanding: (bold emphasis added) Lay means "to place something down flat," while lie means "to be in a flat position on a surface." Most native speakers of any language have their common, vernacular errors. Native speakers often get this ...


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