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3

I don't think that either of those definitions, or for that matter any of the definitions given by Longman, are a great fit for this usage. Here's the definition from Merriam-Webster that I think captures it best: 1 transitive verb: a. to mention or imply as a possibility. suggested that he might bring his family One clue that the sentence deals with a ...


3

untouched sheets of clay were laid spread out before me as her body once [was spread] I interpreted this differently, i.e. untouched sheets of clay were laid spread out before me as her body once [lay]. Thus there is a case for both forms. We sometimes have to make allowances with song lyrics.


0

To my knowledge, there isn't one word. "Aggressive posture" is the best I can come up with.


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Sounds like a "defensive posture/stance" (we wouldn't commonly use "pose" here), so a suitable verb might be "adopting", e.g. "He adopted a defensive posture as the wild raccoon approached him". UCD Digital Library example


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"You are required to take care of my cat after I go out of town tomorrow." This means you are presently required to do so. "You'll be required to take care of my cat after I go out of town tomorrow." This means you will be required to do so (in the future). "He was advised that he was required to sometimes work long hours." This ...


1

Both are correct in both situations. It depends on the author's intentions. Here, "cry" and "crying" are interchangeable, since crying (unless it is to "cry out") is a state that is inherently continuous. Using "scream" means that the man screamed (i.e. let out one scream), whereas "screaming" means that the ...


0

All of your ideas sound good. Some other suggestions: absolutely wrecking demolishing razing cubicles to the ground devastating


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It depends whether you want to emphasize the way in which the follower proceeds, or the fact that he is chasing Kevin. To describe the manner of walking, "strides", "steps", "trots", and "hurries" all could work. To focus on the goal of the movement such words as "follows", "pursues", "chases&...


0

In your examples these are just the present continuous. This developed from using participles with forms of the verb "be". Nearly all cases of "be+ ...ing" will be present continuous tense. The example below is artificial and forced. In fact the classes of "gerund" and "participle" are now so mixed in English that ...


0

Gerunds are nouns. If a person was a gerund, it would be a rare usage. Maybe hyperbole, like "Fred Astaire is dancing." (with emphasis included)


1

"I saw him upset." and "I saw him being upset." are grammatically correct. Both are rather awkward ("I saw him being upset" is the more awkward of the two), however, people would probably just say "He was upset when I saw him."


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If add and ignore refer, for instance, to functions or user interface selections of a computer application, then I would lead the description with the exact verbatim name of the keyword or UI widget, and after a colon, continue with a 3rd person singular simple present verb form like adds or cancels E.g. IGNORE : cancels all previous or pending .... That is ...


0

Sure, in an informal sense. It assumes "google" is a verb, which I think is reasonably accepted by now.


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Think about it this way: while I was talking on the phone, someone knocked on my door. The second clause has to be in the simple past because the person was not literally knocking on the door the whole time that the person was talking on the phone. Now if one was in the process of knocking on the door when something else happened we could use: I was knocking....


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The person was seriously injured, that's why he said relax. So that there would not any further pain or injury. That means the speaker was trying to express " be clam no need to be hurried ". Is that make you clear? Rey


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It is a little ambiguous, although it does sound as though the second option "the company enrolled 20 plumbers onto its payroll" is meant. If you meant the first, you may want to put it in the passive, and write something like "The company had 20 plumbers employed (as of) last week".


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StoneyB has explained well the contexts in which hafta is used, but I'm going to shed some light on why 'have to' is pronounced hafta. I have explained it in some other answers as well, such as this one [Why does the B change to a P when -tion is added to 'absorb']. Voicing assimilation is what happened here. In voicing assimilation, one of the two adjacent ...


2

Eating sweets is tough. Contesting elections is tough. Your answers are correct (although eating sweets is not usually described as tough!) Consider this sentence: Eating is tough if you have no teeth. It is clear that "eating" is the subject and that it is singular. If we add to this, e.g. Eating nuts is tough if you have no teeth. then the ...


1

"To be" is both a linking verb and an auxiliary verb. It is a linking verb in sentences such as "he is a teacher" or "he is sick". It is obviously an auxiliary in sentences such as "he is working" or "he was taken away". It would not traditionally be considered an auxiliary in "he is a teacher" or &...


1

If you look at the Cambridge dictionary entry for do, you will see an entry for EMPHASIS. With this meaning, it is followed by a verb infinitive without to. You could, for example say: I like your dress - simple statement I do like your dress -emphatic When this meaning is used in speech, you would generally put a lot of emphasis on do. The two sentences ...


1

Show mercy towards me. Enjoy yourself. Let's organise a legendary celebration for you.


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"mentioned" is a participle, it is functioning like an adjective to describe the employees. Particples used like this can often be rephrased as relative clauses ... the employees that were mentioned. ... the employees that I have mentioned. (Here you can see how the participle developed into the passive voice and the perfect tenses) The main ...


2

A blot (noun) is a stain of ink (or similar). You would get blots when writing with an old style "dipping" pen, which tends to splash ink on the page. As a verb "to blot" there are several different meanings To stain with ink, or to smudge wet ink. (and hence figuratively, to do something badly) To dry ink using absorbent paper, to ...


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First, the meaning in less poetic diction is “Ignore the inevitability that winter’s cold will come.” I suspect that you are correct that technically it means “Let change come,” but we really have no choice in the matter: it will come with or without our consent. It is used in part to maintain the meter and in part to parallel the imperatives in the first ...


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Informally we would tend not to use "wet" when talking about viscous oils, since we have words like "oily" or "greasy" that are preferable. With very fluid substances like (pure) alcohol, or nail polish remover (acetone) then "wet" is fine. Use a cloth wet with acetone to clean dried paint. Scientifically you would ...


3

The verb wet means the attachment of a liquid to a solid. While mercury can't wet a glass rod, it can certainly wet some metals. Scienceline "wetting" Wetness is the ability of a liquid to adhere to the surface of a solid, so when we say that something is wet, we mean that the liquid is sticking to the surface of a material. Wikipedia "...


1

P.s. what if there are three consecutive verbs? Come, sit, tell me your story. Come sit, tell me your story. You can have more than three. There are many possible formulations depending on pauses and emphasis. Come, sit, have a glass of wine, tell me your story. Come and sit. Have a glass of wine and tell me your story. Come sit and have a glass of wine. ...


0

I made him do it. You saw him do it. It isn't quite natural to see the verb to see as a causative verb in its sentence above. It's technically possible, maybe, at a stretch -- the verb does have a causative sense among the several senses that it carries. However, the grammar of that sense is usually different. If something needs to get done and I'm not ...


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A causative verb is used to indicate that one person causes another person to do something for the first person. "Saw" (the past tense of to see) is not a causative verb as it cannot be used to cause someone else do something. The causative verbs are: let, make, have, and get. The verb to see is usually a transitive verb - one which must have an ...


1

We can use future perfect in order to refer to an action that is expected to be completed in the future before another action. Here, if we expect the completion of homework to happen before the teacher comes to the class in the future, we can say: By the time the teacher comes to class, the students will have completed their homework.


3

English does not work like that. Each word has its own usage that you will need to learn. I suspect that all languages are like that, but I could be wrong because I do not know them all.


2

While English is usually very strict about word order, when it comes to adverbs and the verb they modify, it can go either way. You can say "we worked tirelessly" or "we tirelessly worked". Both mean the same thing. Without doing a statistical analysis, I think we usually put the adverb after the verb. "I worked tirelessly", &...


1

One could certainly write: Properties marked private include owner and address. In this case it may help to think of "private" as a caption for the property. when the term is more of a description the use of "as" may flow better. For example: Fields marked as "password entry" are shown with asterisks in place of character ...


1

"rolls" would be a very reasonable verb to use. It does tend to emphasize that Vince is in a wheelchair, which may or may not be what you want. if you don't, a more general verb such as "comes up to", or "proceeds to", or just "goes to" might work better. This is a matter of style and emphasis.


1

Well, after reading your verbs I thought of another: assuage which goes well with grief and solace. Gngram actually agrees that assuage is more commonly used with "grief" than all the verbs you mentioned: However, the percentages are discouragingly low, so I guess all these phrases are rarely used. I found that to suppress resentment is more ...


1

The denomination of something is its kind or type. Money, for example, comes in different denomination: one-dollar bills, five-dollar bills, twenty-dollar bills, etc. If we have one five-dollar bill, we use the singular. If we have 3 five dollar bills, we use the plural—even though in each case, we have more than a single dollar. The denominator of a ...


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