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3

Something that is "conditional" has conditions. In a legal context, these may be qualifying conditions. For example, you may see a special offer advertised, but the 'small print' advises you that "terms and conditions apply", meaning that the offer may not apply to you unless you meet those conditions. Conversely, something that is '...


1

"Unconditional love" is a common collocation. It doesn't mean anything like "never-ending". If you love someone or something unconditionally, it means simply that you love without requiring something in return. I have never heard "unconditional nothing", and it doesn't mean anything to me. If you have a citation for that, please ...


3

I (a native AmE speaker) do not recognize this usage and would not call it idiomatic. We say someone fills a vessel [direct object] with a substance [indirect object]: Fill a pail with sand. We can also make it passive, or change the subject of the sentence while keeping the meaning: The pail is filled with sand. Sand fills the pail. If you want to keep ...


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Yes, you can put "The rest of the evening" at that start of the sentence. A normal sentence is in active voice. Here is an example: I spent the evening at home. You can turn it into a passive voice sentence by removing the subject and moving the object to the front: The evening was spent at home. In a passive voice sentence, the active-voice ...


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Neither of these are idiomatic or likely from a fluent speaker in AmE. Hello I'm here to receive the payment for the goods rendered to your store. Could you please let me know who pays for it? sounds stilted and awkward to me. The phrase "goods rendered", while not incorrect, would in my view be unlikely to be used in such a connection, it sounds ...


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As John Lawler notes in the comment, whether it is a "behavior" or "summary label" is separate from the grammatical construction that is used. Active or passive voice is a property of verb predicates, but "good at..." is an adjectival predicate. Examples of active voice: Someone tuned the violin. Someone was tuning the violin. ...


4

Both sentences are grammatically correct but not at all idiomatic. Instead, I would say "...when the temperature reaches 10°C."


1

"Deal with" is neutral or occasionally negative. You can "deal with" a problem by addressing it, which may require some distasteful work on your part or it may not, for example: I'm going to deal with the dishes after dinner — neutral. There is an issue (dirty dishes) and you will take care of that issue, but it isn't a big deal. Fat ...


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To add some light here. For this kind of statements, the infinitive "to have" is to show purpose, a goal, a desire, whereas the participle "having" is to show possession of something. In this case, the correct answer is "having" Source: Manhattan GMAT.


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I think the blanket statement that enough cannot modify verbs is too broad. It can appear in a verb phrase when indicating a sufficient amount of time or number of occurrences: You have slept enough (for one afternoon). Paraphrase: long enough I can't thank you enough. Paraphrase: often enough, enough times


1

You can use "it", which would be taken to refer to the taxi itself. If you use "he", "she", or "they" you would not also use "the driver" later on; you might say "and then look(s) at you". These days "they" with the plural forms of the verbs is probably the best choice. Please note my ...


1

It would be: He calculated its value at less than the expected value. Making a prepositional phrase solves the problem.


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X might Y is used to say Y is possible if X chooses or wants Y. It's unknown if Y will/did actually happen. If John wants to take a walk, John might go to the park. X may Y can be used to say X has permission to do Y by someone else, so X choosing Y is a possibility. It also can mean the same thing as might. It's unknown if Y will/did actually happen. ...


2

I might have changed my mind by then I may change my mind by then Both are valid, usage depends on the individual. Personally I would say 'might have changed' indicates that its slightly more likely to happen, 'may change' is a little more uncertain, but its very close between the two.


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It's an archaic translation. The King James Version of the Bible was translated hundreds of years ago, and it's written in an archaic dialect of English that is no longer used. It's basically written in an entirely different language. An English learner should not be using it as a reference, just like how they shouldn't use the works of Shakespeare as a ...


2

The full sentence, from the Bible Psalm 119 is Blessed are the undefiled in the way, who walk in the law of the LORD. Blessed describes the "undefiled in the way". These are also described as the people who "walk in the law of the LORD", so people who walk in the law of the LORD are blessed. Undefiled in the way is not a common idiom. ...


2

Which grammar checker did you use? Machine-based grammar checkers don't always catch all mistakes. The first paragraph you gave (with "have/has") is ungrammatical and unnatural, especially since the first sentence is still in the past tense. It's possible to use the present tense to vividly describe things that happened in the past, as if the ...


7

When we say "verb the object adjective", we mean "make the object adjective by verbing". "Boil the kettle dry" means "make the kettle dry by boiling", just as "paint the door red" means "make the door red by painting". When we use an adverb, like "verb the object adverb", we mean "do ...


2

Tattoo is itself a verb. "I tattoo people for a living". "I tattooed myself with a star last night". It is also a noun so many other verbs can be used in combination with tattoo when it is used as a noun. "I got a tattoo". "I like tattoos". It is not necessary to include tattoo after each word so long as the ...


3

changes of lifestyle = lifestyle changes So the idiomatic options here are as follow: to impose [adjective] changes on something or someone. So that means: a. imposed major lifestyle changes on people during the two past decades. b. inflicted major lifestyle changes on people during the two past decades. To cause major changes in something or someone So that ...


5

Basically, you inflict or impose changes ON something, but you cause or bring changes IN something. You can use any of these verbs, but because the intended meaning is that the impact on people's lives is negative, I think inflict is the best, as it is the most negative of the four: To inflict harm or damage on someone or something means to make them suffer ...


4

When a project is "done", it's completed - and that would be a good generic verb to use in the sentences you provide. If you only care if the student does some of the work on the project, instead of completing or being responsible for the end state of the product, the phrase you're looking for is contribute to. The student should complete (or ...


1

Your second sentence is not technically passive. It is causative. I had X done. The subject is “I,” and the subject performed the implied action. You can express the meaning as follows I made the arrangements that caused X to be done. However, you are correct that a passive meaning applies to the doing of X I had Tom do my homework is not passive at ...


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There is a small group of verbs that may be followed by a noun and then an adjective, for example I find him annoying They are generally verbs relating to opinions: find, assume, consider, think, hold, want, believe. The only way to know for sure whether this usage is acceptable for a particular verb is to check in a good dictionary. In the Cambridge ...


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You are quite right. It's the kind of grammatical error many of us make in informal speech and no-one minds too much. There are many UK dialects where "There's loads of them" and "There's people queuing" are heard more often than their grammatically correct versions. Btw, your re-wording is rather cumbersome. "The latest phones use ...


1

For many English speakers, There's has become an invariable word, irrespective of whether it introduces a singular or plural item. See Wiktionary, which gives an example from Lennon and McCartney: "Imagine there’s no countries." Edit: or a quote used as a headline in a major Irish newspaper: ‘There’s hundreds of kids going to Center Parcs yet we ...


0

You are technically correct. There are new technology and new features is grammatically correct. What is happening here is called ellipsis. What is really meant is There is new technology, and there are new features This gets shortened to There is new technology and new features If you reverse the order of the nouns, no one would make the mistake ...


2

In the first case "put on" would be better since this is the action. And with the present perfect you are looking at the result of the action. It makes less sense with the static "wear". You could have said "you're wearing your shirt inside out" because "wear" already has that static sense In the second, you've ...


3

"Ignore" means "disregard intentionally." (from dictionary) "Ignore" doesn't imply that a line starting with "Title" must exist. But the sentence says "the line". This implies that the person who wrote the instructions thinks that you will know which line starts with "title", so the person who ...


1

Be careful: you can "leave" something that you didn't "put" there in the first place. Someone could have put it there before you arrived and you simply never touched it. Regarding your question, "putting" a person anywhere isn't very natural. "Put" is used when you transfer an object from one place to another, like ...


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