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In this sentence, should I use "hit" or "hits"?

There are a couple of ways to look at this, to put into context. (1) Events In Sequence :: [ XX throw stone(s) XX ] [ very short time gap ] [ YY worrying about it YY ] [ short time gap ] [ ZZ stone(s) ...
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after you havING viewed VS after you have viewed / after having viewed -- is this a special case here?

No. (3) is OK. Using the accusative or objective pronouns me, you, him, us, them, followed by a gerund form (in this case 'after you having viewed') is often dismissed as 'incorrect' by traditional ...
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-2 votes

after you havING viewed VS after you have viewed / after having viewed -- is this a special case here?

Actually, it's number 1 and 3 which are correct. ...after having viewed the document, we... would mean: After we have viewed the document...
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Please explain grammatical composition

Kindly pay the pending salary of mentioned ex-employees The use of "mentioned" strikes me as very old-fashioned, and likely to be thought odd by a native speaker of AmE and I think BrE. (I ...
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"Can be originated" vs "can originate"

I agree with Colin Fine’s answer 100%. The other two responders find the sentence awkward due to the passive verb. There is merit in what they say, but, as Colin Fine has explained, their solution ...
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2 votes

"Can be originated" vs "can originate"

Originate can be used transitively or intransitively. When it is transitive, it has a causative sense: it means "bring into being, cause to be". When it is intransitive, it does not have ...
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What verb can I use to indicate the process of putting together boards, work groups, etc?

Forms of the verbs "choose" or "select" could be used. Versions of text 1 might be: Bodies that are chosen through election shall... Bodies that are selected through election ...
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3 votes

What verb can I use to indicate the process of putting together boards, work groups, etc?

If you absolutely need a word to fill in the blank, the closest I can come up with is "assembled." It's not particularly idiomatic to say that a body is "assembled through election,&...
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2 votes

What verb can I use to indicate the process of putting together boards, work groups, etc?

In British English, you can discuss the individual members of an appointed body, or the body itself as a singular thing. Parole Board members are appointed, by ministers, under Schedule 19 of the ...
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What's the difference between "we have grown to be" and "we have grown to become"?

I would suggest that these phrases are highly interchangeable. To be technical, I think "to be" generally refers to a current status. In example, "we have grown to be great ...
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Allah is knowing of all things

"knowing of" is a phrasal verb, "is" is a verb. Allah is knowing of all things [subject] [verb] [phrasal verb] [preposition] [object]
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Embodied by vs. Embodied in

This is a peculiar variation on English grammar. Grammatically, “embodied by” uses the typical preposition of passive forms. However, other prepositions are allowed in passive forms. Bread is made ...
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What is the difference between "notice" and "realize"?

They are very similar in meaning but there are subtle differences in how they are used. Notice involves direct perception, such as seeing or hearing a thing, without necessarily thinking about it. ...
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Are transitive verb phrases intransitive verbs?

Verb phrases can be both transitive and intransitive, in just the same way as single-word verbs. For example: He digs up the road. "digs up" is a transitive verb phrase, needing an object. ...
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Why use an adverb in "an arbitrarily large number"

There is no verb. The adverb "arbitrarily" is modifying the adjective "large". Adverbs can modify verbs, but they can also modify adjectives, determiners, or other adverbs. an ...
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2 votes

How would a native english speak say "if you look at someone's point of view"?

All of these would be acceptable. I would not worry about verbosity. John thought he was trying to help his friends. But when he thought about it from Jane's point of view, he realized he was ...
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2 votes

A question about a adverb phrase

To get the terminology right you should not call these "adverb phrases". They are "prepositional phrases". These seem to be obligatory complements of the verb. The verb "...
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Which verb form is correct?

The first one is correct: The jobs screen for customers does not show jobs The auxiliary verb (does) is marked for third person, but the main verb is not. It appears in its base form. A helpful way ...
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1 vote

I have known him vs I know him

I know him from school. I know him from work. I know him well. I don't know him at all. The simple present in English is for general statements. It can't be said enough. It is not used with ...
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Has been raining vs Had been raining

Yes, you are quite correct. (d) is possible. As always, the choice depends on the context. If you are speaking on the day in question, It has been raining since morning. But if you were referring back ...
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1 vote

How do you determine the object of a verb in a rather long sentence like this?

Eric Leed identifies and provides [historical, sociological and psychological insights about the different elements that together combine to form a journey, carried out by a traveller]. The object of ...
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3 votes

How do you determine the object of a verb in a rather long sentence like this?

There's no 'one-size-fits-all' approach to determining what you are asking, but here's a simple approach. You know that the most basic sentence is subject-verb-object, right? For example, "I like ...
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2 votes
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Bring in/bring out

At 2:44, when Butler says, "Do you mind me bringing this in?", he is asking Ferguson if it is OK to talk about the topic (of the card, calling him a "numpty") He is asking if it's ...
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I have known him vs I know him

No, #1 is not a correct sentence. And, as a result, no, #1 does not express the same meaning as #2. For what it's worth, related correct sentences (none of which mean the same as your #2) include: I ...
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The word demand is verb or noun in my sentence?

...that is what all patients demand of their doctors... I add to what @BillJ has rightly commented, that demand in OP's example is a verb. To use the noun demands using OP's example, we need a few ...
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The word demand is verb or noun in my sentence?

You are right to say "demand" is a verb. In this case the subject is "all patients". If "demand" were to be a noun: The demand for cars has been rising
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