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I am unfamiliar with the expression "rutting luck". In context it would seem to be an escalation, with Pablo beginning with "damn luck" in Spanish. Stanley, either rudely or as a familiar friend, demands that he translate it. (I don't know if they are close friends or new acquaintances at the poker table.) Pablo seems to match the tone of the harsh or ...


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X is evocative if it causes a reaction. X is evocable if it will respond to something with a reaction. Something that is evocative requires something evocable for there to be anything happening.


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The word as is the completion of the formula Such....as. Such can mean "of this kind/type". Such farms as have sheep: The kind of farms that have sheep, or Those farms which have sheep. Such men as have swords: Those men who have swords. So Such preparations shall be made as will completely obscure... means The type of preparations shall ...


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"To turn in" is just a phrase which is generally synonymous with "submit" or "hand in" and certainly is in the case you've stated above. As @lambie mentions, it would usually be used when talking about handing in an assignment at school, collage or work. Here is a wiki article on the phrase.


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Evocative = evoking or tending to evoke an especially emotional response (Merriam-Webster) Evocable = capable of being evoked (Merriam-Webster) You can think about evocative as a trigger and evocable as being able to respond. In your example, the photograph can be evocative and the person who looks at it can be evocable. A photograph cannot be evocable, ...


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Yes, it does mean “very” in the example you quoted as well as your own sentence. However, in the sentence you gave, it’s more akin to so, as in why did you get so angry with your parents who love you? Saying “why did you get very angry...” sounds awkward to me, though it’s technically grammatically correct.


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It can be helpful to check English-language dictionaries for the definitions of words: respected (adj): Deeply admired or esteemed. respectable (adj): 1, Regarded by society to be good, proper, or correct. 1.1 (of a person's appearance, clothes, or behaviour) decent or presentable. respectful (adj): Feeling or showing deference and respect. So ...


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The words "coming up" are a commonly used set phrase, if not quite an idiom. In the sense used in the question, they mostly indicate that someone is coming to a higher floor, particularly to an apartment from street level. Buzz the door open because I'm coming up. On the other hand, "I'm coming" in a comparable sense means merely that the person is on ...


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In many uses, "thereafter" and "afterwards" or "after that" have essentially the same meaning, and one can be substituted for another with no significant change in meaning or grammar. The word "thereafter" is perhaps a bit more formal, and more likely to be sued in giving instructions, or formulating legal documents. It is also more likely to be sued when ...


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