2

For many people there's is an invariable form, irresepective of whether it is introducing a singular or plural noun phrase. There is is less common in this context, but you sometimes hear it. It is non-standard, but quite common.


2

You need to learn to use capital letters. Sentences must start with a capital letter. Apart from that, your sentence is correct. It could benefit from a comma, which would serve to indicate the natural division into the two clauses. In speech this would be marked by a significant intonation change (falling on "landslide" then high again on "we headed"). ...


1

Well fed is more a description of overall condition. Eating the required amounts or more over time. The word is either sated or satiated. Neither seen much anymore but still true.


1

The starting point is that “like” serves the same purpose is “ummm” — people say it while they are thinking. In that sense, it is just a change in language. However I, too, find it very annoying, as follows. [Also distressing, as I see my native language being actively destroyed.] One issue is that people (i.e. native English speakers) are getting ...


1

Yes, the word spill is often used as a noun, especially when there is a major oil spill in the ocean. See Google Search for "oil spill." There are too many websites and articles to list here. Let's look at the title of one academic paper: Estimating the mortality of seabirds following oil spills: Effects of spill volume. The unspoken admonishment to the ...


1

"Double deck" almost always refers to two levels of floors (e.g. double decked ships, buses and even trains). I have never heard of two levels of shelving referred to as double decked, you would say "there are two shelves to put your stuff on". You might see the variant "rows of shelves".


1

I would like to think I have a fairly large vocabularly, including those fashionably 'obscure' words, borrowings and neologisms that regularly do the rounds (like petrichor, hygge or sonder) - but until reading your post just now I have literally never heard or seen any of these words before. Googling them, it appears that noceur is French, meraki is Greek, ...


1

I've seen the invented word "himbo" used for that. Wikipedia "himbo" Wikipedia also offers a few synonyms: bimboy, mimbo, boy toy and Blank Chuck. Of those possibilities, I think "boy toy" has some currency.


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They are not synonyms even though they are related by etymology. "Reenact" means to do something again. "React" means to do something as a response to something else.


1

That seems to be a "knock, knock" joke, one of a large class. The one you've quoted doesn't seem very funny, but maybe you haven't quoted the entire conversation. As Michael Harvey said in his comment, "There is two" is uneducated usage.


1

I wasn't able to write to you earlier because I had a lot of work. I had to realise a plan of a project and I was on a tight schedule. According to YourDictionary, realize means to achieve or accomplish. In the above sentence "realize" does not make sense, because your goal, from the perspective of time, was not to realize (accomplish), but to finish a ...


1

There are actually two different forms of "to think" at work here, and they're not interchangeable. You can say that you are considering something or something is on your mind by saying "I think of/about (something)". Here, (something) is an indirect object (and thus must be a noun), it's a thing you are thinking about: She thinks about business. I'm ...


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