6 votes

IS "rose by" correct instead of "rose to"?

It's a difference in meaning: Rise by x: new price = old price + x Rise to x: new price = x "rising to" denotes the target and "rising by" the way to get there. The origin ...
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  • 291
2 votes

Is my analysis of the word "blithe" right or wrong?

You should not combine those definitions (1) and (2). They describe different meanings of the same word. Your long single paragraph concentrates on meaning (1) but you have ignored the other possible ...
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2 votes

Can I flip these words and keep the gist?

The past participles known and argued are far more common than struggled after long, so let's check the usage figures for those... Note that this use of "fronted" adverbial long before the ...
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2 votes

What is the difference between hitherto and heretofore?

If the 'vs' in the title is a way of asking 'What is the difference between these words?' the dictionary answer would be 'none'. They are synonyms. Both mean 'until now or until a particular time', ...
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2 votes

What are the differences between "dubious" and "incredulous", if any?

If you are dubious about something, you are inclined to doubt it (suspect that it isn't true/reliable). If you are incredulous about something, you are completely unable to believe it. Dubious has a ...
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  • 30.8k
2 votes

Are there any distinctions between "du jour" and "currency"?

[As you point out, these two words are different parts of speech, and so cannot be used interchangeably] Yes, there is a similarity between the specific senses you point out. However, bbefore anything ...
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  • 1,663
2 votes

What does the word "veritable" mean?

Although 'veritable' originally meant 'actually true', we use it in modern times to emphasise a metaphor or figurative expression. If I say that my father is a veritable tiger when he is angry, I do ...
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2 votes

Is there a difference between "supplicant" and "sycophant"?

They both start with an 's' and end '-ant'. They are both mainly used about a relationship between a weaker or lower-status person and someone stronger or higher status. Apart from that, they have ...
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1 vote

can any grammatical rule show what is the right assertion being said here?

The headline seems to be worded poorly, because the antecedent of "his" is ambiguous. The pronoun might refer to either "Giuliani" or "Trump".
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1 vote

What is the definition of write across?

The conversation which is linked discusses people of one 'identity' (e.g. Black, Asian, white, Mexican, American, British) writing about the lives, feelings, experiences, etc, of people of a different ...
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1 vote

Please is it "the language barrier" or "language barriers"? I feel both sentences mean the same thing. Am I right?

This is not a question of grammar. Both sentences are grammatical. It is a question of context. I feel that learning English is important for everyone [every child in Estonia] because doing so will ...
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  • 27.2k
1 vote

What does it means to be "X whisper"?

Democratic Whispers of ‘No’ Start to Rise. means: There are democratic whispers of the answer to the question "Should Biden Run in 2024". These whispers are the word: no. whisper is speaking ...
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  • 35.4k
1 vote

Is it a redundant phrase?

To slam something shut is to close it with a lot of force, often resulting a loud noise or shock. To give a few examples: He put the bag in the back seat and slammed the car door shut. After seeing ...
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  • 1,663
1 vote

Alter Adjective order and keep the semantic?

They gifted the couple a beautiful Chinese porcelain vase. This version works, so why would we want to switch Chinese with porcelain and defy grammatical rules? These two adjectives are at number 7 ...
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1 vote

What is the difference between "gravitas" and "mien"?

Simplifying, to make it easier to see the difference: mien is loosely equivalent to appearance (but see below), and you can think of gravitas as (more or less) impressiveness. Note: mien is more than ...
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  • 1,662
1 vote

a word/phrase to refer to the behavior of hurting innocent people

To "lash out" is an option: to burst into or resort to verbal or physical attack It is often an unexpected and violent outburst (the reason of which has to be explicated or can be inferred ...
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  • 1,517

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