4

I think most people (in the UK, at least) would say "[She was] holding a [sticking] plaster in her hand", leaving the listener to assume that it was still in its package unless specified otherwise. I would call the container a package or wrapper.


3

The first definition I found for big tent was a widely inclusive composition or character that allows people of differing backgrounds, opinions, and interests to be members of a group or organization I would interpret the phrase big tent pop as meaning something like "popular music which appeals to a broad range of people".


3

Benefict is an obsolete (and I think very rare) spelling if benefit. The OED lists it as a spelling from the 1600s, but gives no examples of it. I have never heard anybody say it. The person you heard is either mistaken, or deliberately using an almost unrecorded obsolete form of the word. And you're right that in many contexts benefit means the same as gain,...


3

Most readers should recognize the term “class struggle” from Marxist theory, and no further analysis would be necessary. If not, however, we can quickly see that “class” as a subject and “struggle” as a verb do not agree: it should be either “class struggles” or “classes struggle”. So, ignoring the unlikely possibility that the paper’s author and/or editor ...


2

No, you cannot reorder it like that. The interstate is south of Washington, but "south of Washington interstate" is not a natural re-phrasing; it sounds like there is something called "Washington interstate" and the event happened south of that place. It might help to think of the original statement as "...the interstate which is ...


2

Although "solar" is very often used as an adjective, here is is used as a noun, meaning (from the context) "solar power". Omitting the word "power" is fairly common in this context. Nuclear is a zero-emission clean energy source. Renewables, including solar, wind, hydro, biofuels and others, are at the centre of the transition ...


2

Yes, certainly. It would mean you examined the place (but more critically, attentively, searchingly - you scrutinised it).


2

"out back" is an idiom. It means "(in) the area behind the house" i.e. "(in) the backyard." I'm out back! Take this out back. My car is parked out back. Both British and American, but perhaps more common in American English. You might notice, if you listen carefully. A difference in the pronunciation of "out back" ...


2

A few options: "Stop backseat driving, you're driving me crazy!" "Stop pestering me, you're driving me crazy!" "Stop nagging me, you're driving me crazy!" "Pestering" and "nagging" are weaker examples as they don't really suggest that someone has good intentions. Generally speaking, if you're "...


1

Questions for which the answer is a list of things are not well suited to Stack Exchange (though they're not specifically against the rules of English Language Learners). But I'll suggest that you don't really want a list of words. Using language convincingly means more than having a vocabulary; it means knowing which word to use in which situation and why. ...


1

You can interpret it like this: The line on a graph showing Omicron cases in these cities curves in an upward direction. Adding ICU stays and deaths to the graph shows a similar curve, going in a similar upward direction.


1

I think that it is notable to start by mentioning that one "plunges" a toilet, and that makes the following sentence a bit humorous! Keanu Reeves plunges the rabbit hole In seriousness, there is a phrase down the rabbit hole, which means To enter into a situation… that is particularly strange… that becomes increasingly [strange] as it develops ...


1

The first sentence says the plane landed on the wrong runway. The second says it chose the right runway but did not quite get it right - perhaps it used what on a highway would be the shoulder. The third includes the second as a special case. Perhaps the plane landed in the center of the runway but too fast. Here the adverb "properly" modifies &...


1

Neither sentence makes sense. We would have to say The mayor of the city wants to make houses available to homeless people. or The mayor of the city wants houses to be made available to homeless people. We would normally speak of 'a divided house' unless we are saying 'a house [which is] divided into flats/apartments'. However, the expression a house ...


1

I'd have to say no - it doesn't feel right in your context. "Size up" may sound like it literally means to measure something for size - but it is so commonly used as an idiom in a metaphorical sense that it no longer sounds natural when using it the way you suggest. "Sizing up" has come to mean a quick assessment or judgement, usually of ...


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