5

Like many words that relate to political or social points of view, the bias of "radical" depends on where you stand. Yes, it is frequently used by the more conservative to belittle those who want what they see as excessive (or excessively rapid) change, but those who want this change may be proud of their "radical" views and see it as a positive. In ...


5

You can say 'I am crazy about psychology' to mean you have great interest in the subject. crazy: 2 informal Extremely enthusiastic. ‘I'm crazy about Cindy’ [in combination] ‘a football-crazy bunch of boys’ ‘And you were crazy about him, too, once, remember?’ ‘I like the melody of the acoustic guitar here, but I'm not crazy about the fact that it'...


4

Fascinated or Intrigued are two that I can think of off the top of my head. "I'm fascinated by Psychology." or "Psychology fascinates me." or "I'm intrigued by Psychology." or "Psychology intrigues me."


4

"bath accessories" suggests towel holders, soap dishes and similar items. In British English, "complimentary toiletries" would be used. An invigorating hotel toiletries range that includes a selection of shampoo, soap, body lotion and shower gel. https://www.hotel-complimentary-products.co.uk/hotel-toiletries Things like sewing kit or shoe polish ...


4

Strictly speaking, the "touch down" is when the plane's wheels touch the ground, and (as Jason Bassford says) is only one part of the overall "landing". However, in practice, these are synonymous and you can use either one in everyday speech: I should get to the airport. My wife's plane is touching down/landing in thirty minutes and she wants me to ...


3

This is using ’s as a contraction for “has”, rather than for “is”. Thus, it is saying that it has informed Sara Bareilles. How the sentence should be read, omitting the contraction: So it has really informed how I am in the world in a big way. The usage meaning “to influence” is the most appropriate definition here. I can tell this because “informed” ...


3

A 'police investigation' is the term for when the police are looking into a particular case/crime. 'Police examination' is not a common expression, but if I heard it, I would think it referred to standardized testing taken by police officers, like in this link.


3

In the context you provide, it is helpful to look at Hotel websites: Looking at some different hotel websites, bath products, bath amenities, or bath necessities are examples of options. To me any of these sound fine, but are ordered in decreasing preference


2

At least without surrounding context, no that is no the meaning for blow received from your sentence. "Blow it" already has a more common idiomatic expression: blow it slang: To ruin, mishandle, or fail to capitalize on an opportunity. Therefore it sounds like the woman failed an opportunity (apparently on purpose) to try to implicate a ...


2

As a noun in a driving context the only meaning of "reverse" is the name of the gear setting. The name of the is gear is always "reverse". There are no alternatives in general use. Put the car in reverse. (not "put the car in back" or "in backwards") As a verb, or an adjective there are more options. You can drive "backwards". You can "back up". You can ...


2

I'm passionate about psychology and Psychology is my passion are also options. To me, the latter expression seems to emphasize that psychology is your MAIN topic of interest, so it may or may not be appropriate based on your situation.


2

How about something as simple as the verb to like? I like psychology. After all, that's what you most often hear people say about things they're interested in. For instance, a person might say "I like math" (or maths, if you're British) to let you know that they like studying mathematics. Another possible way to express the idea of being interested in ...


2

A "grocery store" can be any store where a variety of foodstuffs and related items are sold. It can be a "supermarket" or a smaller, more specialized store. Today, in the US, most people buy most of their groceries in "supermarkets" or something similar -- large, multi-department stores selling meat, fish, produce, canned goods, dry goods such as pasta and ...


2

Laws, regulations, and other legal documents are often, like LaTex documents, organized in a hierarchical system, with multiple levels of numbering. In an legal context "subsubsection" is a plausible term, and does get used. So does "subparagraph" and "subsubparagraph". However, this kind of thing can rapidly become confusing. I would suggest "a third-level ...


2

This can be broken down to two distinct slang elements, both impolite/insulting: "Bugger off" - Go away "smartarse" - person who is using their intelligence, seemingly to show off (see also, clever clogs) This is a reasonable example of a classically British use of swearing.


2

"Bugger off" is a rude British term for "go away and stop bothering me." "Smart arse" is a rude British term (equivalent to the rude American term "smart ass") that means a person who is not being serious.


2

"That" is a conjuction. It links two clauses, and it introduces a subordinate clause. The subordinate clause gives the reason or cause of the main clause. So "that" is close in meaning to "because". I'm happy that she's happy. (the subordinate clause "she's happy" gives the reason why I'm happy.) Unlike "when" there is no conditional sense. If "I'm ...


1

I'm not a native speaker of English, but I'd stick to the expression have a snowball fight. There's no need to force something new, especially as a non-native speaker, when the existing expression occurs 25 times more frequently according to the Google Ngram Viewer. Throwing snowballs sounds perfectly fine as well, but is more evocative of the action of ...


1

It depends on whether you want to describe this quality as a positive or a negative. Some positive expressions: She is a free-thinker. She is a free spirit. She's an independent woman. She does it her way. (as in the famous Frank Sinatra song) She carves her own path (through the world) and various others. Some negative expressions:...


1

In America we sometimes refer to "backing up", or simply "backing". When the car is in a parked position (especially in a driveway that runs perpendicular to the road), people say that they need to "back out" (before they drive away). Example sentences: "When backing, you should turn your whole body to watch the surroundings behind you." "I can't ...


1

In the first two cases along means from one end to the other. Direction is not relevant to the use of along in this case. Along has three meanings but Alongside has only one; next to, or together with Along or alongside can be used when the meaning is next to. However only Along can be used if the meaning is "From one end to another" or "At a particular ...


1

As pointed by Jason Bassford and according to the Cambridge Dictionary, flatter doesn't imply always insincerity. flatter to praise someone in order to make them feel attractive or important, sometimes in a way that is not sincere In the linked page you can also find the following definition indicating that be flattered = feel flattered be/feel ...


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