24

I agree with the teacher. "Obey" is stronger, and may imply legal sanctions backing up the requirement. "Observe" is less official. So, while "obey" means "observe", they aren't exact synonyms, and the latter is more likely to be used in the context you are discussing.


18

"Obey" is not only stronger, it carries a greater connotation of being subordinate. If there is a rule that was agreed upon by a group of equals, it would be more natural to talk about observing the rule. If a king has issued a decree, then you would obey it. Note that this distinction is not hard and fast; neither word would be wrong in either ...


10

The past-tense form conveys, "My experience of watching this episode was a very negative experience." The present-tense form conveys, "My feelings (today) towards this episode are very negative." Both are reasonable and legitimate statements to make, and are obviously closely related to each other. Typically, someone would express ...


9

It is mostly idiom, not grammar. The sense is "I felt the emotion of "hate" when I watched the episode." She is reporting her feeling at the time and so uses the past tense. It would have been correct for her to say "I hate this episode". In this case she is talking about her current opinion about the episode. But it is ...


5

ter summat stronger if yeh've got it is used to show heavy accent or a dialect by writing words as they are pronounced (see Phonemic orthography). Here ter would be the phonemic orthography of to: I wouldn't say no to something stronger if you've got it, mind. (I have written in bold the words that were replaced to imitate accent.) This site indicates ...


5

To reword Jack's answer, "observe" and "obey" have different connotations: a feeling or idea that is suggested by a particular word although it need not be a part of the word's meaning, or something suggested by an object or situation For example: Get home by 6PM for dinner. Obey me. I suggest that you observe the 6PM dinner time.


3

"The other right" (or "the other left") is a jokey way of telling someone that they got confused and turned the wrong way. Quoting from the TV Tropes website: If ever in a comedy somebody tells a character or a group of characters to move/turn left, you can bet the character/one or more of the group will go right instead, prompting the ...


2

Of course not! There are about 180,000 fundamental words in English (more than 3 million definitions, phrases, Idioms), and learning all of them is definitely futile, because it will take 30 years to memorize and put them in use, therefore you need to work on the 20,000 to 40,000 words almost all native speakers know; I have never agreed with the sentence: &...


2

"Disabled" This is a simple and generally non-offensive word. But use it as an adjective "disabled people" or "People with disablities". Don't use it as a noun. Don't talk about "the disabled". Physically challenged/differently-abled. These strike me as being ill-thought-through alternatives. A profoundly deaf ...


2

Yes & No, It depends on your definition of terrible. If you mean it in the sense of not being good at something then Yes, your example means terrible. However in the case of "loose hope", Hopeless is not the same as terrible . terrible adjective (BAD AT) Ref C.E.D. very bad at doing something: There are two meanings of hopeless, as you have ...


1

The book is using Hagrid's voice to show he comes from a rougher, less high class background. In plain English, he says: "I'd not say no to something stronger if you've got it, mind." The use of "I'd not say no" instead of "I wouldn't say no" adds to the effect.


1

"Accompany" is a fine word to use there, but it takes both a direct and an indirect object—you do not need the infinitive "to go:" I don't mind walking home as long as you accompany me home. You could insert (or substitute) a prepositional phrase: I don't mind walking home as long as you accompany me along the way [home]. Alternatives ...


1

This article is very, very poorly written, and you caught some of the bad grammar. There's two ways to fix this mistake: your way and the way intended by the speaker. Your way: "...working for you. The reason is...". The writer's intention: "...working for you, the reason being...". Note that it's all one sentence now. If you're not ...


1

Let's look at the definitions for each verb. defeat, Etymology 1 (transitive) To overcome in battle or contest. This is a viable choice. One team defeated the other team. score 3. (transitive, intransitive) To obtain something desired. 3.1. To earn points in a game. This does not make sense in context. Points or goals are "scored." A team is ...


1

As Fumble commented, "all-nighter" is a noun meaning something that lasts all night long. I'm my experience (in America) it is almost exclusively used to mean a study session (or similar event, such as writing a paper) that takes so long the person doing it is not able to get any sleep at all before starting their next day. In this usage it takes ...


1

In your first example, the two usages have exactly equivalent meanings In your second example, the “got drunk” refers to a past interval of time, to a process. The “was drunk” refers to a past instant of time, to a state. The difference is slight because before the past instant when he was in the state of drunkenness, there was a past interval during which ...


1

While cybersecurity protects devices and networks from harm by third parties, Online Safety protects the people using them from harm by the devices and networks (and therefor third parties) through awareness, education, information and technology. Ref What is online safety/ Is the difference parallel to that between "food safety" and "food ...


1

quick-witted; adjective; able to reply in a clever or funny way without thinking for a long time Ref C.E.D.


1

Just read. Read a lot. Read about a wide variety of topics. Thinking about what qualifies here, I'd start with periodicals. Newspapers and magazines are released regularly and often have diverse topics to cover. If you're looking for a completely free answer, try a news site online. NPR and AP are both factual sources. The more you read, the more likely you ...


1

The two words have the same meaning in this context. "Observe" is slightly more formal in register. It's also a little more general, in that we can observe rules, conventions or advice, but "obey" really only applies to definite commands (including rules). (This is a UK perspective; usage may differ elsewhere in the world.)


1

To gorge on something is eating a lot of it at high speed. Gorging on something gives the image of stuffing your face so much that your cheeks or belly are bulging out and you keep stuffing more in. Compare with the word "engorged", which means full to bursting. "Power eating" competitions are all about gorging. To binge on something is ...


1

The proper term for this action is one you have already used—relocation, which has the connotation of forced relocation. You are correct that "evacuated" implies they were moved for their own safety. "Evicted" means they were forced out of their house, but does not mean that they were sent anywhere else in particular; "driven out&...


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