New answers tagged

2

"Shake out" idiomatically means to empty out by shaking. So, if you "shake out your shoes" it means you are shaking them to get unwanted things out of them, for example, if you got small stones or bits of gravel inside your shoe. It would not be idiomatic to say this about the process of getting dirt of the outer part of a shoe. "...


1

"Dust off" is not apt. It means to wipe a surface with a relatively dry object. "Shake out" is fine to describe a vigorous action to remove things that are hard to remove like insects or wet sand. "Pour out" is fine to describe an action that lets gravity remove things that gravity by itself will remove like water or dry sand. &...


1

We can say that we perform an act using a noun to indicate the purpose of the act. An act carried out to please God, or anyone else, is done for the pleasure of that person. Likewise, we can say, for example, that a teacher makes a demonstration, delivers a lecture, etc, for the instruction of his or her pupils.


1

He is both a customer and a passenger. Using "customer" emphasises the fact that "the customer is always right" so is used by taxi companies to remind their drivers to have a "customer focus". Passenger emphasises the fact that he is getting a service from the driver. So we have "Taxi passenger rules: No smoking, do not ...


1

Generally, the two terms are mostly interchangeable in their use. Like many "pairs" of words in English that are mostly interchangeable, the terms "grateful" and "thankful" differing linguistic roots, namely Latin and German, respectively. Originally (that is, the better part of a thousand years ago), both words had much the ...


0

Instead of "In the following," you could simply say "Next,"


1

You can assuage a feeling, pain, or desire; you can soothe these things, and also soothe a person. You cannot assuage a person. Assuage Soothe


2

The examples you give are certainly not "rules", otherwise nobody would ever make a negative statement. I wouldn't even say they were all "principles" either, as they might not all apply in every situation There are some general principles of writing that we refer to as "rules of thumb". That is an expression we use to describe ...


1

It's a long, long time since lunatic has been anything but a colloquial insult. You seem to be confused in your definitions. Mental/psychiatric illness is an acquired condition which can be treated. (2), (3) and (4) refer to irreversible conditions, usually present from childhood. The approved term, at least in the UK, is people with learning difficulties. ...


-1

The best term to use at the moment is disturbed. It covers a wide range of mental issues, and is not offensive in any way. The Cambridge dictionary defines it as: not thinking or behaving normally because of mental or emotional problems (UK) so mentally confused or ill that special treatment is necessary (US) In my opinion, the US definition would also ...


2

An occurrence is every instance of the event. A recurrence is every instance after the first event. So the first recurrence of the event is the second occurence. If I understand correctly you want the option to change every event, including the first one. In this case I would say that "Occurrence" is the right way to lable it.


2

Great = large, considerable. Grave = serious. Just two different ways of expressing the same idea.


0

A phrase that could work is ‘taking out your anger/frustration on someone else’. So, in this case Sarah was taking out her anger with her boss on her husband. However, it doesn’t necessarily imply that someone’s emotional balance is recovered, although it often does. Hope this helps!


0

In Britain, where we have a lot of Indian restaurants, we are used to calling the main dish a thali, or thali plate, and a main dish with a set of smaller bowls or dishes is a thali set. Pronounced like 'tally'. Thali Plate A thali is a round platter with an eared rim. ... The thali is generally made with steel or copper. Other dishes served on a thali ...


0

It depends on how much you want to Anglicise, which depends in turn on who you are talking to. It is a thali, for example, being sold on ebay. This is the most specific, but many English speakers won't know this English word. It is a "stainless steel, Indian style serving tray". It is a dish, a plate, a tray, a platter. You could use any of these ...


0

I'd call it a 'serving dish'. To be more specific, I'd call it a 'divided serving dish' or a 'serving dish with compartments'.


0

As Jason said, it should read 'the 4th and 5th'... and the answer is 'semesters', because there are two of them. Some English users might say 'semester' because the immediate antecedent is '5th', but that is a casual mistake.


4

Your analysis of "money spent" is reasonable: the phrase includes the noun "money" and its participial modifier "spent".  This "spent" is the past-participle form of the verb to spend. Your analysis of "substance use" is mistaken.  The word "use" as it exists in this phrase is not a verb.  It's a ...


2

It isn't quite clear from the picture what it is, and that is relevant because it depends on the purpose of the structure. For example, it could be a tollbooth on a motorway, or it could be a security checkpoint at a border. These type of barriers are used in various ways. The word 'checkpoint' implies that some kind of procedure is involved, i.e. showing ID....


1

They are actually both farewells. “See you” in that context is shorthand for saying “I’ll next see you”. Socially, it’s courteous in that it lets them know that we’re thinking of them and looking forward to when we’ll next see them. If we’ll be continuing to see them now it doesn’t make sense to state when we’ll next be seeing them.


Top 50 recent answers are included