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2

Thistles: a family of plants with prickles on their leaves (specifically 蓟) Thorns: hard, sharp, needle-like parts of a plant (刺) or a type of plants that have lots of thorns. Your dictionary just means that 荆棘 can be translated as "thistles and thorn-bushes" (although looking wikipeida, it seems it means "thorny undergrowth" or "...


2

It's probably a reference to Genesis 3:18, though that is thorns and thistles. Thorns also and thistles shall it bring forth to thee; and thou shalt eat the herb of the field; (King James Bible) God tells Adam that he will be able to make a living from cultivating the land, but will have to contend with tough weeds.


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It is fairly informal, I would likely just use 'contribute'. And note that in the US for example it isn't necessarily true. Many school districts are funded from property taxes rather than more general revenue sources.


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There is no specific term, or at least no commonly understood term. (There is a very rare term "pentad" or "pentade". I'd never heard it until now, so don't use it.) The phrase "Round numbers" is like "large numbers". There is no standard definition of "large number", but we all know that 10 is larger than ...


3

The Personal Computer (IBM 5150), or PC, was a computer model from IBM first sold in 1981. It was followed in 1984 by the Portable Personal Computer (IBM 5155). The North American company IBM Corp. had been the leading actor in enterprise and administration computing hardware and software for decades up to the '80s, precisely and ironically until the PC ...


0

Yes, it is an English word, and it is still used, but it is rather rare to use this word generically to simply refer to computers. As pointed out, it is often used to distinguish from Macs, thanks to a popular ad campaign from back in the day. If you go around in the US referring to any computer you see as a PC, unless there is some additional context, you ...


1

Yes. It's a genericisation of a particular class of computer, based on the IBM PC which initially defined it. I've never seen any suggestion that it was defined by running any particular operating system, but I think that it would be unusual to apply it to a desktop computer which predated the IBM PC's launch and as such didn't use the PC architecture.


16

Yes, PC is commonly used in English to mean a computer (one PC, two PCs), but different speakers use it to mean slightly different categories of computer. The term originally stood for "Personal Computer", but became specifically associated with a computer called "PC" released by IBM in 1981. The IBM PC was followed by a number of ...


0

In UK legal terms for Rights of Way they would be; Footpath / public footpath, or bridleway (horses allowed) This is called a "Green lane" in the 4x4 / motorbike world, technically it's classified as a road and officially a byway open to all traffic (or BOAT) I'm not certain on this one, a fire-break gap (vegetation removed but not specifically ...


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Yes. "PC", standing for "Personal Computer" (pluralized "PCs" when abbreviated), is a valid English phrase, and does refer to both desktop and laptop computers. Indeed, the term originated in English, though if you want specifics as to how the term originated, perhaps you should ask the Retro Computing SE site. For historical ...


4

PET is a standard abbreviation for a particular type of plastic, polyethylene terephthalate. It is used when sorting plastic items for recycling, but in everyday conversation I think most people would call it a 'plastic bottle'.


1

A casual word in everyday speech would be "git". Although it might be more regional.


1

As a speaker of American English I would not hear those sentences as identical. "I'll call round and see you on my way home." suggests to me that I will stop by your house on my way home (perhaps from school, or after running some errands). "I'll call around and see you on my way home." suggests that I will be visiting people all ...


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Mediator is probably the best: One who negotiates between parties seeking mutual agreement. It carries the connotation of a third party who tries to find a middle ground between two other parties, as opposed to simply negotiator which could mean someone working for the benefit of one side or the other. Evaluator or arbitrator are similar terms you can look ...


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Q. “I'll call round and see you on my way home.” Can we replace 'round' with 'around'? a. Yes. In this particular case the two words "around" and "round" are interchangeable. Note Round & Around both have several definitions and only in some instances are the two interchangeable. The Definition of 'call around' as relating to a ...


3

Sequester, it's not a common word, but means to isolate or hide away.


3

Surprised no ones suggested Isolate If I study alone, I can isolate myself from potential distractions or interruptions from other students in the study group.


8

To distance yourself. If I study alone, I can distance myself from potential distractions or interruptions from other students in the study group. Source


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