New answers tagged

0

From Merriam Webster: to make perpetual or cause to last indefinitely You often hear this with "biases" or "stereotypes", so for example: I didn't want to perpetuate the idea that she was a bad person Merriam Webster also lists this: International federations, committees, and governing boards must be intentional in evaluating their ...


1

It looks like it was a job title that Claudia Bloom (in the article) made up for herself. A "location" is the place where a video is shot. People who make advertisements want cool locations. She is hired by people who own cool places (like a surf shop, or a houseboat) and finds advertisers and content creators who want a location like this for ...


0

I think the second sentence you have posted doesn't use 'better still' right. It should be: That act of kindness is a cherished memory in our hearts. Better still, it is growing as, many times, it has encouraged us to offer others something beyond their expectation. You would use 'better still' just like 'even more satisfactory'. Such as: "A Toyota ...


0

Ok, I found this definition from AmSlang dictionary (which seems its not online anywhere. bubble v. To completely zone out of a group conversation and engage in one-on-one conversation with a date or significant other while the group conversation continues. Davin and Elyse bubbled while the group continued debating the existence of true love. n. ...


3

Not "single bubble" but "singles bubble" "Singles" are single people. People who don't have spouses. A bubble is (in the context of Covid) a group of people who may make social contact with each other, but must socially distance from people in other bubbles. When a case of covid occurs within a bubble, only those in the bubble ...


1

Yes, you can pull down the sun visor, and put the sun visor up. There are lots of idiomatic ways to say this. Perhaps "fold down" and "fold away". You should probably usually say "sun visor", as "visor" (without modification) usually means a transparent (or perforated) face-shield, such as on a motorcycle helmet. You ...


0

The two words mean different things, but it is odd that they are both being used to describe the same thing. If something folds, it bends or pivots so that you can double it over and reduce the length. A fairly common item is a folding chair, which pivots in two places so that three segments (the legs, the seat, and the back) all lie flat against each other. ...


1

It's better to say: "I had to part ways with Paul in my thinking" Typically you use "part ways with" instead of "part ways from", although I think both constructs can be recognized correctly. If you say "I had to part ways in thinking from Paul" it's unclear whether you're parting from Paul or whether you're ...


1

Most of them have the a similar meaning to "were you aware of the intonation pattern" with the exception of "find" and "discover" which have would a more "did you actively search for the intonation pattern" sense in that phrase.


1

You can switch lots of nouns without breaking grammar rules, but if you want to keep the intended meaning, "reveal" is the best choice. The noun form of "reveal" refers to an intentional revealing of some previously hidden information. In a mystery novel, the "reveal" is the part towards the end of the book where the reader ...


4

The phrase is a reference to 'Slip Slidin' Away', a famous 1978 song by Simon and Garfunkel. The use of 'slip' and 'sliding' is an example of poetic repetition, common in songs and poems. One action or event is described by two words instead of one. Slip Sidin' Away (YouTube)


0

No, your word order does not make sense. "Newly past-participle" means that the action is recent. In this case, the building of the power plant is recent, but your version says that the state ownership is recent. Also, then built stands alone by itself, and we lose the meaning of the original sentence that the power power has been built recently. ...


1

Not in this case, because "newly built" functions as a single element in the list of adjectives. A state-owned built coal fired power plant would be possible, but reads very oddly, because it's hard to see what kind of plant would not be "built".


1

In a few words: • Being = now, generally, now+further. • Having been = before (some main action).


2

Yes, there is a difference. One is correct and the other is not. "The USA" is a proper noun, similar to "Spain" or "Congo" or "Russia." The demonym (word used to describe the nationality of a person or thing) is "American" or "Spanish" or "Congolese" or "Russian." The demonym is ...


2

"Being" is the present participle. It refers something happening at the same time as the main action: Being a good student, I learned a lot in school. Being knowledgeable about the matter, I can tell you the answer. In both cases, both parts happen at the same time. "Having been" uses the past participle "been". It refers ...


Top 50 recent answers are included