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Reserved 1: restrained in words and actions Thoughtful 1a: absorbed in thought : MEDITATIVE Pensive 1: musingly or dreamily thoughtful Quiet 1a: marked by little or no motion or activity : CALM Introverted : having or suggesting the characteristics of an introvert especially : possessing a reserved or shy nature typically with an ...


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If the idea is to remove any negative particles: That number is now obsolete.


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This works: I disconnected that number. As does this: I deactivated that number. Disconnected is the more common of the two, though. When you call a number that is no longer in service, the message generally says: "This number has been disconnected."


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Any kind of two-storey beds are bunks, whether built-in or not.


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No, ago refers to relative time, not sequence. You can correctly say: Something happened (one minute, one day, one week, one year, one decade, one century...) ago For the examples you provided, correct grammar would use back or forward as these are referring to positions of items in sequential order. 1) Please check three pages back to find the ...


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<tl;dr> The difference between rights and privileges is critically dependent on the context in which the words are employed. That said, there are some general guidelines and common exceptions that are discussed below. There are two closely related definitions of the word right that are relevant here: proper claims that justly accrue to everyone; ...


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Too broad to answer it because the terms are actually flexible. But I'll answer it in general. Privilege is made or granted by someone. On the other hand, rights are inherent. Rights don't require anything from anyone in general. Rights cannot be taken away; privilege can be. Check out dictionaries for further information.


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gorge on and binge on are basically the same thing. To eat too much of some food(s). devour [direct object] means to eat one thing in its entirety or completely. He devoured his meal Some insects gorge on blood. [formal] The kids binged on chocolate. [slangy] Binge is more slangy.


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There may be other frequent contexts of the sentence 'I am going to see friends.': I am going to accompany friends to show them the way out of something. I am going to help my friends ( for example, to study in a college until we graduate it) .


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This is an adaptation of chess terminology, not geometric terminiology. Such words are not generally used to describe faces of a cube. The files are the lines of cubes running from you to your opponent (forward and back) a "file" is not a diagonal. In neither 3d nor regular chess can a rook move diagonally. The ranks are the lines of cubes running from ...


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No, these terms are not in general use for a cube. They are normal terms in discussing chess, but hardly ever used (with these meanings) anywhere else. A rank is a row parallel with the ends of a chessboard; a file a row parallel with the sides of the chessboard. Evidently in the 3D version, the writer is using column for the third dimension of the ...


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I generally agree with LawrenceC's answer, but there is a bit more to say. Lean is one of many verbs in English which can be used as transitive or intransitive. The intransitive use refers to the object which is tilted (as LawrenceC says): The ladder was leaning against the wall. The transitive use is causitive: I leaned the ladder against the wall....


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X leans on Y or Z leans X on Y specifically means X tilts (or is made to tilt by Z) toward Y far enough to touch it. This usually means either X or Y is supported by the other. If you replace the above with support, tilting might be involved but other methods of keeping X on Y could be used. I leaned the board on the table (Board is tilted). I ...


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