New answers tagged

6

These are beams: These are slats: A beam is a large, thick, and strong piece of wood. A slat is a thin strip of wood. A beam would be used for construction (but not every piece of lumber used for construction would be qualify as a beam). You might see slats used to hold up a mattress, or to make the seat of a bench, or in Venetian blinds.


2

Bless is entirely appropriate in this context. You might ask if is better to say "the pious man asked God to bless.." depending on the belief that people have about effect of prayer.


1

As you have identified, "stand-alone" is an adjective and is not correct at the end of the sentence. It needs to have a noun to go with it. You could try something like: "It seems like the output may not be useful as a stand-alone product". (I don't know what the output is so I'm not sure if product is the right noun here. You can ...


0

Yes. I would understand this sentence as expected. It is a good way to say this.


1

You see, Harry was really awed after knowing about him being a wizard, and that he was going to Hogwarts. He expected everything he found in the Wizarding World to be magical, and to some extent dangerous. On the Hogwarts Express, Harry got a taste of the nasty Bertie Bott's Every Flavour Beans. At first glance, they seemed to be normal Jelly Beans, but ...


1

opposing is the adjective opponent is the noun So: opposing team or opponents


4

To go under means to deliberately shut down a business as a failure, especially due to lack of revenue. To go bankrupt is a formal legal process where a business (or a person) declares that they are unable to pay back all of the debts that they owe. The courts may then require them to sell off certain assets and use the proceeds to pay back some of that debt,...


0

"Gone under" is a metaphorical description of business failure, comparing it to drowning by going under the surface of the water. "Go bankrupt" is a possible legal recourse of a business that fails. As pointed out in the comments and the other answer, I was wrong to say the terms mean the same. "Gone under" means that the ...


1

Time is a resource, quite like money. You can spend it on an activity, and you might have some that you can spare for something unexpected (like a request from a friend). So these are likely sentences: "Can you spare ten minutes to help me with this?" "Let's spend an hour looking for the problem.


5

They're effectively opposites that fit together. To spare time is to avoid doing anything (else) for that period of time. To spend time doing something is to occupy yourself with something for that period of time.  (You wouldn't normally speak of ‘spending time’ without specifying what you were doing.) So you can spare some time in order to spend it on ...


1

No, this is not a common or correct expression. "Your night is dark": This is not something I have ever heard before and searching on Google brings up 0 relevant responses. It is grammatically correct and I could see it being used if there was some other information/reference/inside joke to provide context. To me, it sounds overly cryptic or ...


5

"Spend time" is simply a statement. You may have plenty of uncommitted time, and spending some of it with loved ones is just what you do. "Spare time" implies that you really have other things you'd rather do with that time, so you're making a sacrifice to spend it with loved ones.


7

To spend time means to do something during that time. One can spend time with family, taking a walk, working, idling. To spare time means that something that came up that could use up some of your time. If you spare it some time, you then spend some time on it. The sparing is generally when it's scheduled -- even if it's immediate.


11

You ask someone else is they can spare the time for something. Excuse me, could you please spare a few moments of your time? If you refer to yourself I can spare some time to talk to you it makes you sound self-important or condescending. In the context of your loved ones, again it makes it seem that they are unimportant, if you say you can spare some ...


3

Desperate describes a condition or state of being so its verb definition would have to be "existing in a condition of desperation", which doesn't yet exist. Therefore, you'd have to make one up—which you could, because that's how words are made. The dictionary is not a rule book, it's a record of common usage. Taxonomy doesn't have a verb form ...


0

Short answer: despair is what it is linked to, but you could use these: They became desperate They grew desperate They lost hope You place desperate (adjective) in the 'willing to do anything' section instead of 'no hope' even though your definition says: Desperate(Adjective): feeling that you have no hope and are ready to do anything to change the bad ...


-1

The meaning of words shift over time, and different parts of speech with the same root can drift separately. There are plenty of examples of words with the same root with very different meanings. For instance, "terrific" has the same root as "terrify". "Basement" has the same root as "abase". The verb "confect&...


4

I think the way desperation manifests itself in action depends upon the nature of the desperation. For example, you might vacillate or prevaricate if you're desperate to make a decision, but you might lust or crave if you're desperate to possess someone or something.


0

It does not make sense to ask for a verb that is an equivalent of an adjective. There are no verbs that is the equivalent of any adjective, really. It's like asking for the verb of 'long' or 'beautiful'. Adjectives describe a state. verbs are actions. For most adjectives there are words that can describe getting closer to a state, like 'grow, elongate, ...


9

He despairs of ever finding a gift his son will really like. He is desperate to find a gift his son will really like. He may really want to find a gift but if he despairs of finding one, he believes he will not. The two sentences mean different things. [despair=to feel despair about something] despair is a noun and a verb. despairing is a noun (gerund) or ...


23

It's not entirely clear what you mean by "verb of desperate", but if you mean "what is a single verb that means the same as to be desperate?", then there isn't one. To be desperate is as close as you'll get.


20

I'm pretty sure it is 'despair'. The Oxford definition of 'desperate' says: Origin: late Middle English (in the sense ‘in despair’): from Latin desperatus ‘deprived of hope’, past participle of desperare (see despair).


1

The words "off-campus" might be more widely understood than "extramural". The words "part-time" are in contrast to "full-time", which seems different from "on-campus" versus "off-campus". If you are linking the two, you might ask "Is it bad to be a part-time, off-campus student?".


2

Being stationary concerns movement from point A to point B, while still refers to movement in-place. Water boiling in a kettle, or a child sitting in a chair waving its arms around are stationary (they stay in one place, without changing position in space), but not still (as they do move in-place). If you're sitting in a wheelchair that's rolling down a hill,...


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