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The so-called best single adjective you could use for this is equidistant: 1 : equally distant // a location equidistant from two major cities In the example sentence, that would be: The two equidistant cities are included in our comparison. However, I said "so-called" because there are two problems with equidistant: Normally, two or more things ...


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They are relatively interchangeable here. When we say "number", we are referring to a defined/finite amount, whereas "amount" can also be interpreted as an overall mass, for example. I would say the usages in the quote you have shared are appropriate for the following reasons (it's not a strict interpretation, but more why I like it in terms of style): ...


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Sorry but this must be an error - "distanted" is not a word. In its place you could use either: Distant - but this is relative - saying both cities are distant would mean they are far away from you, not necessarily from each other. Remote - this would mean the two cities are isolated, away from anything else, which would include everything, not just the ...


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Proceed: meaning to continue as planned would be better than "How to do". How to do what? However, if writing instructions it is better to use a 'Task-oriented' Active voice, for example: To make a cup of coffee: Fill kettle Heat water to 87.6 C... Select cup or mug Select coffee of choice etc.... "How to proceed" is a bit redundant ...


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Prompted (Prompt) This would be the initiator to start drafting the bill. (Something that happened that raised the idea that a bill was needed to get a law in place) Introduced (Introduction) This would be tabling the bill/motion in parliament (or other legislative body) to get it passed into law.


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Generally, an event or some new information prompts something, for example in this Guardian article: This has prompted concerns that humans might be contaminated by the chemicals used in plastics or the pathogens that ride on the particles. A person or organisation would introduce something, for example this Lonely Planet article: Australian carrier ...


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Yes, recipient can be used for objects, for example, in chemistry. Khan Academy (about chemical bonds): In general, the loss of an electron by one atom and gain of an electron by another atom must happen at the same time: in order for a sodium atom to lose an electron, it needs to have a suitable recipient like a chlorine atom. Wikipedia (about ...


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A recipient, as your definition states, is normally a person or an organisation. You may be after the similar word receptacle. A container, device, etc., that receives or holds something (Dictionary.com) As in: Please take a receptacle to the water fountain. A "water recipient" to me would be a person who is given water. But it sounds quite formal, ...


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They are all pretty common idioms, some more so than others. I won't get into their meanings since you can look them up in dictionaries. You should know that many idioms can be regional. By that I mean some idioms are common in the UK but not in the US, and vice versa. Even in just the US, different regions may have different idioms. Even native speakers ...


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In the structure X spend(s) Y Z, where Y is a duration; Z can be an action or a thing. If it's a thing, a preposition is needed. I spent 2 hours washing my clothes. I spent 2 hours at the laundromat. Actions can be considered things if expressed as a gerund or gerund phrase. A context where you'd want to "thing-ify" an action is if you're ...


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According to both the Oxford Learner's Dictionary and the Cambridge Dictionary, when you talk about spending time, if you use a present participle (-ing), you don't normally use the on preposition. Here are two examples from the Oxford Learner's Dictionary: the first uses a present participle, and the second one does not. spend something on something: How ...


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Does this mean that, in reality, the position of White servants was not improving? That is right. First, the Handlins cannot adequately demonstrate that the White servant's position was improving during and after the 1660's... This says that the Handlins can't prove that the White servant's position was improving. ... several acts of the Maryland and ...


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I wouldn't call it a "formal" phrase; however it is well-known, and widely used. It is used in newspapers, and not just downmarket tabloids - this article from credible business journal The Financial Times uses it in a headline. If you search the expression on Google Books you will also see that it is used, not just in creative writing, but in many "...


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I have spent 54 years in an active business career, including the last ten years on a sizable bank's board. The English that has consistently been used in every business where I have been an employee or a director or an active stockholder is standard American English. There are of course words with technical meanings used in business, but those meanings ...


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I have worked in such a role. Typically, and specifically, it's called front line support (or Tier 1 support, level 1 support, or first-line support). From "What it’s like on the front lines of support" at Zendesk: Here’s what a few agents on the front lines of our Tier 1 support had to say about their agent experience: … Three things support agents ...


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Well, in most cases, the person would be "Customer service representative".


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If you are spreading the water with your fingers, spread, sprinkle or splash would be a good verb. Spread is a general purpose verb that means to cover an area. Sprinkle usually means spreading slowly and deliberately. Splash usually means spreading quickly and without much thought.


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