25 votes

"What is the weather today?" or "How is the weather today?"

Both can be fine. While the first focuses more on the objective description of the weather, and the second focuses more on someone's subjective opinion of the weather, the answer can go either way, ...
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  • 87.1k
17 votes

"What is the weather today?" or "How is the weather today?"

They're both perfectly natural. Arguably some people might think the what version is more appropriate when the speaker is specifically interested in knowing what the weather actually is (or perhaps ...
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11 votes

how she is charming / how charming she is

The version John understands how charming she is. is about how much charm she has. The version John understands how she is charming. is about what makes her charming or why they call her ...
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  • 2,394
10 votes
Accepted

"What time...?" or "At what time...?" - what is more grammatically correct?

The initial preposition at in such contexts is entirely optional, but it usually wouldn't be included (although in reality we usually use when rather than [at] what time anyway :). OP's specific ...
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8 votes
Accepted

"Why do you not give" Vs "Why do not you give"

This is a very simple example of subject–auxiliary inversion, and it is required in most interrogative sentences in English. The subject and the auxiliary verb appear in the reverse of the order in ...
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8 votes

how she is charming / how charming she is

The other two answers are both correct, even though they are slightly different. Why? Because "He noticed how she is charming" is ambiguous. It can either mean: He noticed that she is charming (...
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  • 2,688
8 votes

"What is the weather today?" or "How is the weather today?"

I agree with both the other answers about the relative usage of the two forms you've mentioned. I will add one more possibility: Often when I'm deciding what to wear for the day I'll ask my spouse to ...
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  • 4,012
4 votes

On the singular vs plural aspects of "who"

There are two possibilities for 'Who' as an interrogative pronoun: it can ask about the subject or the object of the sentence. Asking about the subject: Use third-person (singular) form of verb ...
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  • 7,465
4 votes

Is the auxiliary verb “do” required in WH-questions: "Which security flaws these protocols have?"

A beginning guide to questions like the one below: Security protocols have flaws: Which security protocols do these protocols have? Have is the declarative verb. All questions with have need the do ...
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  • 36k
4 votes

how she is charming / how charming she is

how she is charming refers to the fact of her being charming. how charming she is refers to the degree of her charm. He noticed how the ladder was wobbly. He noticed how wobbly the ladder ...
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4 votes

After whom are you looking? At what are you looking?

You're confusing prepositions and "prepositional verbs". Multi-word verbs are verbs which consist of a verb and one or two particles or prepositions (e.g. up, over, in, down). There are three ...
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  • 278
4 votes
Accepted

(Why + can) - Is it a possible structure?

It's perfectly acceptable to use "Why can..." though it's more common to hear "Why can't..." Often "Why can" is used in comparisons, whether explicit or implicit. Explicit: "Why can my sister ...
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  • 10.2k
4 votes

George became a writer of detective stories. (What / Which) did George become a writer of?

You only use "which" when you present a choice of answers. For example, if you presented someone with an apple, a banana, and an orange, you might ask "which would you like?" As ...
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  • 74.8k
3 votes

How to make questions with "what" in the middle of sentence?

Only the first sentence is correct English: Iran is supporting the Palestinians, Lebanese, Syrians... but what makes these countries terrorists? The reason why only the first sentence is correct ...
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3 votes
Accepted

'on what' or 'on which' floor are you?

It really makes no difference to the meaning of the question which of the two you use, in today's common usage. Using 'which' sounds slightly more proper to me. I imagine that if the Queen of England ...
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  • 4,653
3 votes
Accepted

Do questions with "which" need auxiliary verbs to make a question?

Which websites (do) report unbiased news about Iran? Which websites (do) people read in Iran? Here's a test to decide if you need an auxiliary verb to make a particular question. Write out a ...
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3 votes
Accepted

How many people are (there) in your family?

Let's look at them without the "there": How many people are in your family? How many apples are in the fridge? These are completely fine. Technically, you would answer "How many are there?"...
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  • 582
3 votes

Making 4 types of question

You are right that your examples are wrong. Interrogatives usually require the modal "do" except in highly stylized or obsolete usages. Does she have to get up early? Does she have to get up ...
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  • 28.6k
3 votes

Who do go there?-VS- Who go there?

When asking questions about who does something, it's usual to use the third person singular form of the verb - so "who goes there" or "who does go there". You would usually use the simple form unless ...
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  • 22.3k
3 votes

"What time...?" or "At what time...?" - what is more grammatically correct?

As user070221 notes, both sentences are commonly used in American English. In some formal speech and writing, "At what time" is more acceptable than "When" or "What time", especially when "a precise ...
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  • 23.8k
3 votes
Accepted

Is it correct to say, "Where did you throw the ball?"?

No, the question is entirely correct grammatically. If you were watching baseball, for example, and you didn't see where someone threw the ball, you might very well ask "where did he throw the ...
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  • 14k
3 votes

one of which vs. one of whom

(a) is fine, (b) is fine grammatically, but less common since one would tend to use a pronoun like "who" or "whom" for a person, and "that" or "which" for a ...
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  • 153k
3 votes
Accepted

How can we know the aim of question tag(where,who) if we don't use preposition?

I'm afraid none of these is very idiomatic. We could say "Where did you draw it?" for the first three (it being the picture). For (2) we could also say "Where were you when you drew it?&...
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  • 32.4k
2 votes

"What is the weather today?" or "How is the weather today?"

As an English man I have just come across this phrase in a foreign school teaching children English. I have to admit I have never heard anyone say or use the phrase, "What is the weather today ?". In ...
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  • 21
2 votes

"What is the weather today?" or "How is the weather today?"

To me "What is the weather today?" is a very unnatural sentence. At least in my recent memory, I've never heard a native English speaker say that. As others have mentioned, the what version conveys ...
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2 votes

Correct Sentence construction for Wh Question

Not in Standard English. Main clause interrogatives like this require subject-auxiliary inversion: "Where did you bring all these vegetables from?" Note that the plain verb-form "bring" is required ...
2 votes
Accepted

Wh-clause: what even you must condemn

I think the meaning is He was lying, a thing even you must condemn. But, what (a thing) even you must condemn, he was lying. Presumably you're willing to accept hypocrisy or a degree of shady ...
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2 votes

"What time...?" or "At what time...?" - what is more grammatically correct?

Both the sentences are correct and mean the same thing. what time is just a shorter form of at what time
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2 votes

How long haven't you done your homework?

It does sound odd. Slightly better would be For how long have you not eaten oranges? But simpler and better would be When did you last eat oranges? Your question is about the past, and the ...
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  • 153k
2 votes

How long haven't you done your homework?

The question is grammatically correct but is unusual. I think using "haven't" makes this sound like a negative question, which can be confusing, because it is actually a Wh-question (how long?) Since ...
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