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2 votes

Is the following sentence structure correct? — "How many story a building is it?", "How many person a tent is it?", "How many core a processor is it?"

All the answers so far are (in my opinion) correct, but the OP’s confusion results from a difference between what an adjectival phrase can accomplish in English, and what a copula can. You can say: ...
Michael Lorton's user avatar
0 votes

Is the following sentence structure correct? — "How many story a building is it?", "How many person a tent is it?", "How many core a processor is it?"

Another idiomatic version of the question using the verb BE: How many stories [alt. spelling storeys] is the building? How many weeks is the course? How many years was the (prison) sentence? How ...
TimR's user avatar
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1 vote

Is the following sentence structure correct? — "How many story a building is it?", "How many person a tent is it?", "How many core a processor is it?"

How many x: How many is always followed by a plural noun. That is actually a grammar point: How many times did the organizers increase the price? How many increases in the price were there? The price ...
Lambie's user avatar
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1 vote

Is the following sentence structure correct? — "How many story a building is it?", "How many person a tent is it?", "How many core a processor is it?"

1 is not common or particularly idiomatic; there are no Google hits for the question outside of Stack Exchange; but it doesn't seem ungrammatical. To me, 2, 3, and 4 seem worse. It relates to which ...
Stuart F's user avatar
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0 votes

"How many strong was the army?", "How many fold was the increase?" — Can we use "strong" and "fold" this way?

Your sentences would probably be understood, but they are not the way fluent speakers would say it. The straightforward way to ask the first question is, "How many soldiers are in the army?" ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 68k

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