25

It is ambiguous, but we would probably assume that the word "his" is referring to the boss, for a number of reasons: Only you can see the fairy - they are a supernatural entity and it is unclear that you can touch them. Fairies are typically conceived as female (although they don't have to be). The stereotypical boss is probably still imagined as ...


13

While "I" is the subject of the main clause, "who/whom" is part of the relative clause, and refers to the object of the preposition "for". The subject of that clause is "the cafe", not "I". It's easier to see if we split the two clauses in your sentence into two separate sentences. It now looks something like ...


10

Your suggestions are sound. Most people think [that] she is at the peak of her career. She's an actress who most people think is at the peak of her career. The objective form "whom" is not appropriate here. It doesn't function as the object of to think. That role is filled by the entire subordinate clause. The role relevant to this word choice ...


9

"Whom" is the technically correct word in this construction, as the answer by user gotube explains. But "whom" is rapidly becoming obsolete. Many native speakers no longer use it in any construction. Thus I would suggest rewording this without "whom" such as: I am the one that the cafe was kept open for. This carries the same ...


8

You are correct It should be “whom”. ✔️Yes: All of whom were picked for the Arjuna award this year. It’s whom because of the word “of”. (It’s acting like an object, not a subject. The technical terms are “objective and subjective case.”) (See here (1) and (2)) You would say “all of him,” not “all of he”, so whom is correct. But whom is ...


8

This is known as an "unclear antecedent", and is formally considered a grammatical error even when the meaning is obvious. I recall an SAT study question from long ago, "Neither the Christians nor the lions knew their hour was up". The correct answer was to mark the sentence as an error. It didn't even matter if the hour ended for both ...


6

The easy way to tell if you need who or whom is to substitute it for he or him and see which one makes sense. For example: Take the section with who(m) in. Which group has the most exalted status at your high school depends on who you ask. Substitute he in. Does it make sense? …depends on he… Substitute him in. Does it make sense now? …depends ...


6

You are correct, it should be "whom". By the traditional rules, "who" is used for subjects and "whom" for objects. "Who asked the question?" "Who" is the subject, the person doing the action, so that is correct. "You asked whom?" "Whom" is the object, the person receiving the action, so that is correct. The word "of" is a preposition, and so what follows ...


6

I think "his" refers to the boss. The reason is mostly explained by rjpond but I have another reason: If the storyteller intended to say that the word "his" refers to the fairy itself, they would've said, "A fairy only you can see tells you to superglue his own mouth". Here, the word own is used to indicate that his refers to ...


5

The system is subject but then the next clause talks about pedestrians who also become subject crossing the regions etc. Removing the pronoun itself will also work. A quick trick! Now, cut off the sentence. Pedestrians whom are crossing [something] Here only, we get a hint that it seems incorrect. Now, think that it's about 'you'. If 'I' fits, put '...


4

You are correct about examples 1-1 through 1-4 - whom is the "correct" word, though in modern usage, who is usually used when whom would be appropriate. "Whom does he look like?" would probably sound affected or overly formal to a modern audience. As ColleenV points out, this question has been asked before, and Mechanical snail has a very good answer here: ...


4

Directly after a preposition is the place which most tenaciously hangs on to whom - perhaps because this is a context where there is no doubt that whom is the (traditionally) correct choice. Not everybody uses whom even here, but I think anybody who uses it at all will use it after a preposition such as of.


3

The trick does work substituting the objective pronoun or the subjective pronoun in place of "who/whom". Did you speak to him? Whom did you speak to? Did you go to see her? Whom did you see? Who is it? the problem you are running into is the "I/me" switch. Properly, one should answer the phone It is I not It is me but the latter ...


3

No, you probably shouldn't replace the writer's "who" with "whom". Well, you physically can do that, but you probably shouldn't. For if you did, then the result would be considered by many (especially those who are teachers) to be ungrammatical. The result would be considered to be ungrammatical (by them) because the relativized element or gap in the ...


3

You could make an argument for either: "who (will it be)?" or "whom (will I have as my girlfriend)?". However, "who?" is definitely the most likely and most idiomatic option. In general, when hesitating between "who" and "whom", it's better to go for "who" - otherwise you risk being either hypercorrect or excessively formal.


3

Yes, it's correct, although most speakers would shorten I am to I'm. To be sure, break the sentence into its two main parts. She is the mother of one of my students I am teaching this student on Skype. This student is the object of the second sentence. So the relative pronoun required is whom rather than who. You might simplify you sentence as: She is ...


3

In the form of the statement with to be which is based on an object complement: Many people think her (to be) unready for prime time. She is an actress whom many people think (to be) unready for prime time. the objective-case whom is not incorrect. But you are far more likely to encounter this nowadays: Many people think she is unready for prime ...


3

Whether you can or cannot omit who/which/that depends on the role that it plays in the sentence. When it is the subject, you cannot drop it: I know a guy who sings in a band. I have a key that unlocks many doors. But when the subject of the second clause follows who/which/that, then you can drop it. Can you give back the book (which) my dad lent you ...


3

No, "whom" is correct. "Who" is the nominative case—it is used when the word itself is the subject, such as in the sentence "Who is that man?" All other cases of the word use "whom," as in "For whom was the store kept open?" ("the store" being the subject of that sentence).


2

In strict registers, WHO acting as the object of a verb or a preposition is always cast in the objective case, whom. If you rewrite the clause without ‘pied-piping’—with the preposition for ‘stranded’ at the and—whom is still called for in formal writing: Angela was curious about the unopened letter on the table and wondered whom it was meant for? There ...


2

When "who" is the object of a preposition it should be replace with "whom". Both of your sentences are correct. For whom is it meant? (Correct) Who is it meant for? (Correct) For who is it meant? (Incorrect)


2

Okay, let me reintroduce a simple rule. Note that in most of the cases this will work. Though some will come up with their detailed views denying this! Yes, that subject-object rule is concrete (in fact, they are called that way - I is a subject pronoun and me is an object pronoun) but this one is simpler for learners like you and me. To avoid perplexity, ...


2

Technically, "whom" is correct. The word is the object of the preposition "for", and so should use the object form of the word. In practice, 99% of English speakers say "who", probably because the sentence is structured to put the preposition far from its object, and so it is not obvious what role each word is playing. In general, use "who" when the word ...


2

In the first sentence the relative clause is derived from He (nominative) works hard. In the second sentence you have All praise him (accusative). The structure of the two relative clauses is different. In the first one you have no subject after "who", so "who" is the subject of the relative clause. In the second one you have the subject "all" after "who". ...


2

Someone wants me dead? I can't think of who/whom. This is an interesting sentence. At first glance you would think that whom is called for, because it is the object of the preposition of. In fact it is not the object of the preposition. The object in the example is the fused relative clause who wants me dead, which has been reduced to who by ellipsis. In ...


2

Whichever may be correct for the "whom" construction, the sentence suffers from tense shift. To fix it either -- It was me that you saw in the window. Or, It is I that you see in the window. Note that I intentionally changed the sentence to a more common construction in order to point out something that few people seem to know. The "for whom" and "for which"...


2

Your sentence Anyone who stops learning is old is grammatically and metaphorically correct and understandable, but may not be literally correct since it is possible young children may stop learning, especially those in unstable areas. "Stops" is the correct verb to use.


2

OYou can use either who or whom; both are correct grammatically. It's common to use "who" in place of the object pronoun "whom". The use of the whom is formal or less common in speech and writing. Furthermore, the who/whom is a relative object pronoun in the relative defining clause "who/whom I thought was thoroughly honest". You can drop the who/whom. ...


2

Whom was this book written by? Your proposed sentence is grammatical. As you suggest, it will be perceived by many native speakers as formal, probably excessively formal for ordinary conversation. By whom was this book written? This is also grammatical, but sounds even more formal and unnatural. I would not recommend it. The structure used here is "pied-...


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