6 votes

''will'' or ''going to''

Will and going to are both used to indicate future events with a high degree of confidence. They are predictions without caveat. They are stating the future with as much certainty as possible. You can ...
SamBC's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

A question regarding will/be going to Advanced Grammar in Use

If you look to your left, you will see a hippopotamus. If you look to your left, you are going to see a hippopotamus. The speaker knows about the hippopotamus in either case, and so to express ...
TimR's user avatar
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3 votes
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Are "will" and "going to" synonymous?

There's also "I will watch TV". All the different future tenses that show up in English have differences. Sometimes they are major, like the future perfect, and sometimes they are subtle. Sometimes ...
SamBC's user avatar
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3 votes

Present Simple vs Future Simple vs Present Continuous vs "Going to" vs Future Obligation for events in near future

Future indicative: The bus is leaving in ten minutes. grammatical The bus is going to leave in ten minutes. grammatical If things go as usual or if things are to go well: The bus should ...
TimR's user avatar
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3 votes

The sun <is setting/is going to set/will set/will be setting> at five tomorrow

To understand this you need to firstly be aware of how to use the present continuous to talk about the future: The present progressive indicating a future event speaks about arrangements for events ...
SovereignSun's user avatar
3 votes

"Will" and "Going to", in negative sentences. Interpretation of future plans

Native English speakers use going to and will interchangeably in many sentences, even sometimes when the events are (or are not) planned in advance. For example, both "the fireworks will start at 7pm ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

difference between WILL, BE GOING TO and the present continuous

tl;dr The source cited misses actual distinctions between going to and will, and posits differences that don't obtain. I'm putting this response in an answer because I don't know where else to put it....
user105719's user avatar
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3 votes

can "will" be used instead of "be going to" in these sentences?

The fact of the matter is that native speakers use "be going to" and "present continuous" to refer to future actions, events and states much more often than "will". English learners usually overuse"...
Fermichem's user avatar
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3 votes

"Next week she will be" vs. "Next week she is going to be"

The truth is that there really is not much difference between "will" and "is going to" in modern English. They basically mean the same thing to most people. Various grammarians like to talk about ...
Foogod's user avatar
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2 votes

A question about using "be going to" and "will" with the present perfect in a question

There is no difference in meaning between to be going to X and will X. It will rain tomorrow. It's going to rain tomorrow. I'll go to the store at 3pm. I'm going to I'm going to go ...
LawrenceC's user avatar
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2 votes

I will turn the AC on vs i am going to turn the AC on

will has several possible meanings- including, as you say, for a prediction or an assumption. The sun will set at 6.53 pm - future fact I think that it will rain tomorrow - prediction I ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
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2 votes

Using "going to" with come

in your case you can use several different ways to talk about the future: 1. Present Continuous + time word: I'm coming to your house today. This form used to talk about plans which are already ...
Shannak's user avatar
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2 votes

Using the present continuous or "going to" in "He is sure that he will be working for them next year"

Question 1: Could it be possible to use present continuous instead of "will be working"? "He is sure that he is working for them next year." Some other languages may allow you to add "tomorrow" or "...
Sam's user avatar
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2 votes

Present Perfect Continuous and Future Simple - quiz contemplation

As your source says, when we use the present perfect continuous to refer to states that have recently finished we don't use a time word (or phrase). "Bob has been talking on the phone for an hour" ...
James K's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

another question of going to or will

Both are essentially identical. If you really want to split hairs, the "will" sentence is a decision made at the moment of speaking, whereas "be going to" sounds like a slightly ...
Alex TheBN's user avatar
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2 votes

I don't agree with the keys on the "going to" vs "will" topic

The key here is that the situation is explained as: "You have decided to hire a car". The decision has been made, even if you have not hired the car yet. This means the situation is not ...
JMB's user avatar
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2 votes

I will close the door / I'm going to close the door?

I think the first one definitely sounds more natural to me in 99% of cases. It has the implication that you were unaware that you left the door open and now that you have been told you are going to ...
mjard's user avatar
  • 41
2 votes

Going to and Will - prediction

You are never required to use "going to." You can always use "will" instead of "going to," though it often sounds more formal. But the reverse isn't true: in some ...
alphabet's user avatar
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2 votes

humanity will die out vs humanity is going to die out

Both versions express certainty in the event which is yet to happen. However the version with less words, just using the word " will ", has the effect of increasing the severity of the ...
Chris's user avatar
  • 121
1 vote

going to for a non planned decision

As far as I know, "to be going to" expresses more like intent, rather than detailed plan. Even so, "to be going to" is still suitable, because a plan is still a plan, regardless of when it was ...
virolino's user avatar
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1 vote

Why not present continuous or "going to" for these events?

We use present simple when we talk about schedules, programs, etc. (for public transport, cinemas, etc.): My train leaves at 11:30, so I need to be at the station by 11:15. What time does the ...
Diamond's user avatar
  • 1,285
1 vote

Why the use of "going to" in that case

"Going to [verb]" is simply another construction for future action. It means the same thing as "will [verb]", but is slightly less formal. "It will rain" and "it is going to rain" mean the same thing....
Tashus's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

'will' and 'be going to' which is correct?

Both structures are possible, depending on what you want to say. Will is used for: decisions made at the moment of speaking (e.g. I'll open the door!) predictions (I think it will be cold) offers ...
Enguroo's user avatar
  • 5,492
1 vote

Not coming to your show / Not going to come to your show/ will not come to your show

In this context of matter there is no difference between the 3 expressions, they are merely different ways of saying the same thing.
Veraen's user avatar
  • 436
1 vote

I am never going to talk to you ever again vs will never talk to you

"I'm never going to talk to you again" is perfectly normal. "Planned or scheduled" is too narrow: the "gonna" form also expresses intention. (I think it's unhelpful to talk about this as "present ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.3k
1 vote

I am going to/will be 30 tomorrow

There is a further use of "be going to": To talk events happening in the future as a consequence of the present state. "It is my birthday, so I'm going to be 30 tomorrow." The pattern developed from ...
James K's user avatar
  • 218k
1 vote

I am going to my parents or I will go to tomorrow

both are correct, but if you don't add any context if you said I am going to my parents I would expect it to be very soon, or you are already on the journey.
WendyG's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

Will vs. Would vs. Be going to

A : Hey, wanna see the next match? The one with us against Germany? B : Nah... Germany will win. 40 mins later A : Hey, we are winning. It's 1:0. Come and watch it with me. B : Sorry, ...
bikeman868's user avatar
1 vote

what is the difference between "going to" and "will"?

A very confusing concept. Both refer to future There is a slight difference between them but in most cases they are used with no difference in meaning.Both can be used for making predictions. For ...
Hajra Zamir's user avatar
1 vote

Will and going to

The use of if does not effect the meaning or usage in your examples. She will fail if she does not study. She is going to fail if she does not study. A subtle nuance is "will" makes it sound ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 66.2k

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