16

BE + going to - Lindsay is going to fly to New York next week. Forms with BE + going to possibly originated in such utterances as: 1. We are going to meet Andrea at the cinema, uttered when we were literally going, i.e. on the way, to the meeting. At the moment of speaking there was present evidence of the future meeting. This use has become extended ...


13

I am going to the cinema tonight. This indeed shows that plans are already made (not necessarily that tickets are bought already, but the speaker is sure that he will end up watching a movie tonight). I will go to the cinema tonight. This is not "formal" as you mentioned, but for this scenario rather implies spontaneous decision (the speaker decided ...


11

I don't think your concept is correct. The sentence is correct as written. There is no different "distance into the future" implied by the use of going to be versus will be. I can use either to talk about things that will happen in the next 2 minutes and the next billion years: I am going to finish this answer before I go to bed. The Milky Way and the ...


7

Both of your examples are correct. Let me explain why. Both of your examples are in the simple future tense. There are two forms of the simple future tense: http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/simplefuture.html 1. to be going to + base form of a verb (or verb1) "I am going to be fine." This form is usually used to talk about future plans. "I am going ...


7

"When I will grow up, I will be a doctor." should be written as "When I grow up, I will be a doctor." to be idiomatic English. (See Using the future tense in a sentence containing a dependent clause starting with "when"​.) "Be going to" is used to show what somebody intends to do in the future, but that doesn't necessarily means between five ...


6

A far more casual response could be, "I'm thinking of catching a movie (film, flic, or flick) tonight." I am Canadian and as such, I do tend to borrow from the French, hence, flic/flick for film.


6

You could simply say: I have plans to go to the movies tonight. Plans are plans, not cast in stone, and are implicitly subject to change. You nailed the answer in your question.


4

There is nothing to prohibit this construction, and if you use it it will neither raise eyebrows nor be misunderstood. Here are a couple of examples: A lot of people graduating with an MPH are going to have taken the same classes, so you'll have an advantage if you can show that you have been responsible for data analysis. — Beth Seltzer, 101 Careers in ...


4

They're effectively equivalent, just as in the "real-world/present tense" versions... 1: "I think this book is going to be your choice." 2: "I think this book will be your choice." You could make the same "pseudo-distinction" that #1 focusses more on the "present status" (the book is currently destined to be your choice), and #2 more on the "future ...


4

In terms of future events, the present continuous indicates an event that will happen in the near future, so "A spaceship with a human crew is landing on Mars tomorrow" works, but "Sometime in the next twenty-five years, a spaceship is landing on Mars" is just too far removed from the present. Remember that the PrC connects to the present - if you ...


4

If you look to your left, you will see a hippopotamus. If you look to your left, you are going to see a hippopotamus. The speaker knows about the hippopotamus in either case, and so to express the difference between the two in terms of the speaker's knowledge is confusing and not very illuminating. We might express the difference in terms of the ...


4

Will and going to are both used to indicate future events with a high degree of confidence. They are predictions without caveat. They are stating the future with as much certainty as possible. You can use them for planned actions, yours or others, or predictions of the future; either way, it just means that you are as sure as you can be that it will happen. ...


3

Jennifer's eight, and she doesn't know what she's going to do. One day she says she's going to be a dancer, and the next she says she's going to work with animals. I don't think that the construction going to carries with it a sense of determination so steadfast that one cannot change one's decision the next day. A child is especially likely to change their ...


3

Both 'will' and 'to be going to' are correct in these phrases. They are both referring to a future action. While 'will' is sometimes used to enforce more certainty and determination ("I will do that"), both of those phrases are correct and either could be used. we use 'to be going to do something' when we have already decided to do something This isn't ...


3

Both are fine; they mean the exact same thing. In speech, the first is more likely to be contracted: I'll be fine. I also have the impression it's more common than "going to be", likely because it's shorter to say. Also of note is that in cases like this, "going to" is often spoken as one mushed-together word: I'm gonna be fine. This should ...


3

They are both grammatically correct. Like Jim comments above 'going to' is more likely to be spoken. Since both constructions are correct, the ultimate meaning comes down to how it is emphasized by the speaker, and also how it is taken by the hearer. In written form, the 'will' seems a bit more emphatic. But if I exclaimed a loud: " ... this is going to ...


3

Arguably, "I will learn English" is a more definite assertion, whereas "I'm going to learn English" can be read as a statement of intention rather than a statement of fact. This is not always a clear distinction, though, and can depend on the context.


3

Native English speakers use going to and will interchangeably in many sentences, even sometimes when the events are (or are not) planned in advance. For example, both "the fireworks will start at 7pm tomorrow" and "the fireworks are going to start at 7pm tomorrow" are perfectly fine, even though it's clear they've been planned well in advance. So it's ...


3

Future indicative: The bus is leaving in ten minutes. grammatical The bus is going to leave in ten minutes. grammatical If things go as usual or if things are to go well: The bus should leave in ten minutes it usually leaves then. The bus should leave in ten minutes. or it will be late Requirement: The bus is to leave in ten minutes. ...


3

To understand this you need to firstly be aware of how to use the present continuous to talk about the future: The present progressive indicating a future event speaks about arrangements for events at a time later than now. There is a suggestion that more than one person is aware of the event, and that some preparation has already happened. e.g. "I am ...


3

There's also "I will watch TV". All the different future tenses that show up in English have differences. Sometimes they are major, like the future perfect, and sometimes they are subtle. Sometimes the difference in meaning depends on context, or on even on what the verb is. "What will you be doing this evening?" "What are you going to do this ...


2

It's basically identical, yes. The phrase suggests that the thing being done is slightly difficult or laborious in some way, or perhaps that is has previously been delayed for some reason, but it's very subtle. This is likely to be spoken English, not written.


2

In all of OP's examples except G+H, there's no reason to think either will or be going to is any more likely than the alternative. Nor can I see any particular difference in meaning. G+H is different because "I'm going to paint the kitchen today" is a much more likely response. The reason for this is simply that I am [whatever] implies a stronger link to ...


2

There is no difference in meaning between to be going to X and will X. It will rain tomorrow. It's going to rain tomorrow. I'll go to the store at 3pm. I'm going to I'm going to go to the store at 3pm. What do you think she'll do? What do you think she's going to do? The book will be on the shelf, just look for it. The ...


2

will has several possible meanings- including, as you say, for a prediction or an assumption. The sun will set at 6.53 pm - future fact I think that it will rain tomorrow - prediction I will finish this job if it kills me - expression of firm intent I will see John about this tomorrow - future plans I will help you - expression of ...


2

in your case you can use several different ways to talk about the future: 1. Present Continuous + time word: I'm coming to your house today. This form used to talk about plans which are already arranged for a particular time in the future. and it is used very often with come and go and with verbs like visit, meet, etc ... 2. BE + Going to: I'm going ...


2

Question 1: Could it be possible to use present continuous instead of "will be working"? "He is sure that he is working for them next year." Some other languages may allow you to add "tomorrow" or "yesterday" to the present tense, and the result is understood. Even in English, there may be certain cases of that... However, typically in English you ought ...


2

As your source says, when we use the present perfect continuous to refer to states that have recently finished we don't use a time word (or phrase). "Bob has been talking on the phone for an hour" has a time phrase, so I'd interpret it to mean "the state continues to the present" The question about dinner, "I'll make dinner" can be interpreted as an offer, ...


1

The short answer is yes, the first two mean exactly the same thing.   * But see note below. Corrected versions: I'm going to go over to your house as soon as the work is done. (Future action expressed with “going to”) I'm going over to your house as soon as the work is done. (Future action expressed with present continuous) Note: It's go to ...


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