13

I see it less as a matter of certainty and more of a matter of situation. Your first sentence is dealing with a hypothetical situation. I wouldn't sell my house for two million dollars. That means that, even if someone were to offer me two million dollars for my house, I wouldn't accept the offer. No one is making such an offer, but I'm saying that I ...


12

Multiple choice tests posted here are always very disheartening; the test-writers don't seem to have a great grasp of English grammar. The short answer is that you are right and the test is wrong. The long answer is that both are acceptable, but that "would" is much more common. "Would," as you said, introduces a hypothetical. All animals would die ...


10

Would is the past tense of the auxiliary verb will, which has a primary use as a marker of future time. It may seem odd that the word has a past form, but it comes to bear in what is called past futurate, which is contemplation of future action from the past. The verb form thus arises from the transposition of tense required for a report of direct discourse (...


9

A paradox is a situation, so the adverb "paradoxically" does not describe a person or a thing. In both of the examples you cite, the adjectives refer to the object or person. Look at another adjective as an example - let's use the word brilliant: How brilliant the world's greatest chefs are! Here "brilliant" is describing the chefs themselves. They are ...


6

In the first example, the second conditional expresses a hypothesis on a present situtation, imagining an impossible or unlikely event. Your father would be proud of us (if he were here now) It might as well imply he is dead, or simply away. In the second example, the third conditional expresses a hypothesis on a past situation. Your father would ...


6

You ask Why did the author use "that" after the adjective "paradoxical"? How paradoxical is an exclamation. Exclamations often have no explicit verb. The verb is implicit: {something} IS so very paradoxical. What is the "something"? In your sentence, the that-clause is the "something"; the that-clause is the subject of the verb IS which is ...


6

So here, the “he” in question is not “baffled by the way the crime was committed,” but he “would” be (“undoubtedly”). I strongly suspect that “he” is not “baffled” primarily because “he” doesn’t know about the crime or how it was committed in the first place. If he later learns about it, for example, then the speaker expects him to be baffled by it. This is ...


5

Wouldn't and won't are not interchangeable in your three sentences. The meanings of the sentences are different depending upon which form of the verb is used. If wouldn't is replaced by won't in the first sentence, we have: Here, you won't say, "May I ask you what is your name?" Won't (a contraction of will not, the present tense of the verb will ...


5

We have given the simple answer of above question. Would rule : Uncertainty condition. Will rule : certain condition.


5

She said she would help me when she finished her work. Compare: I will help you when I finish my work. That is what she really said.It is called "direct speech". The sentence you are interested in is called "reported" or "indirect speech". When we have a reported verb in past simple (said),we usually do some changes while reporting. Thus, will help ...


5

I'm not sure "would" can be used in the way you describe, because it implies a hypothetical, "If [A] happens, then [B] would be true." That container would hold a gallon (if you put a gallon in it). I don't think this is more tentative (yes, meaning "expressing uncertainty") than "will". It just implies that there's some hypothetical component to the ...


5

Your version If current results hold, Man City will win [the] PL title. is perfectly grammatical, although I would prefer not to eliminate the "the", except in the space-limited context of the online display in the image. In fact I think it is better than the version with "would". There is uncertainty here in a sense, because no one yet knows if the ...


4

Another way of saying natural tendency is calling it proclivity, both will and its past equivalent would are used to express, what Michael Swan (Practical English Usage) describes, habits and characteristics Will and would can be used to talk about repeated and habitual behaviour. Would refers to the past. When nobody's looking, she'll go into ...


4

If we don't substitute anything, we get the sentence from your title: Nonetheless, university students would have to choose study over work, especially if they are undertaking a degree in theoretical subjects. I think that substituting "will" for "would" is the correct answer in this case: Nonetheless, university students will have to choose study ...


4

Yes, you are correct and this simple question can have various meanings, depending on context. It can be a real question: "Will Trump build the wall?" (asked of someone who works for Trump) "Yes of course, but we are just waiting for Mexico to send us the check to pay for it." It can be a rhetorical question (in a magazine article): "Will Trump ...


4

The future is always hypothetical. Whenever you use will, you are talking about someone's expectation, plan, hope, or fear. If the concern is still current, if the authorities are worried today, use will.


4

Would and used to have very similar meaning but the main difference is that used to can be used to talk about past states while would only applies to past habits. Want to be a practising doctor is a state of mind not a habit/repeated actions. For more information, check this explanation at the BBC's Learning English website.


4

People do speak like this. How you wrote it is correctly spelled. It's helpful to put this in the same category as slang - you do not want to write it this way in professional or formal writing. An author of in a book of fiction (or a comic book)P may do this, where the author is writing how people talk, but you wouldn't see this outside of that context ...


4

1)  The best match in Merriam-Webster's listing is definition 4 — used in [an] auxiliary function to express probability or presumption in past or present time.  Here, it seems to be a presumption about a hypothetical past.  He hadn't been baffled, but he would have been.  2)  Only the first verb in a predicating phrase has tense and attaches to a subject. ...


4

"Could" and "would" have some special use patterns when requests are involved. Would you like a cup of coffee? ^ This is a correct way to ask if the listener wants you to give her some coffee. Could you like a cup of coffee? ^ This is not correct; it sounds wrong and would not be spoken by a fluent speaker. "Could" refers ...


3

What would you do if it rained on your wedding day? What will you do if it rains on your wedding day? The first example is a hypothetical, taking the subjunctive verbs would do and rained. The second is about futurity -- the wedding is already scheduled -- so it takes the future in the main clause and the present indicative in the subordinate clause.


3

You can express this as a narrative with its center of conscious (or temporal origo) being the inebriated politician as he looked forward to the election: After having drunk seven beers, he announced his candidature in the presidential election that would take place in 2018. or as reportage told from the perspective of the reporter and the readership ...


3

You are on the right track. In the first case, the speaker is saying I COULD NOT have done it - the speaker was unable to. In the second case, the speaker is saying I WOULD NOT have done it - the speaker may or may not have been ABLE to, but either way, simply would not (for whatever reason) have done it.


3

It is not so much the wills and woulds as the "solves" that makes it unclear which eventualities are hypothetical. In the context of present-form narrative, the indicative implies an actual eventuality, which in turn implies that a) Mary perseveres in her determination to kill herself and b) the consequent murder is also actualized. If that is the case, ...


3

The first sentence isn't really correct. It should read: If I had had a free year, I would have traveled the world. (In everyday speech, it is often spoken the way you wrote it, with a single had. I think it's more often spoken correctly, but both are common.) It's called the third conditional; it refers to a hypothetical situation in the past, which (...


3

A historian uses the conditional to denote probability/possibility. So, this: Many of the tools used by Woodland people would have been familiar to their Archaic ancestors.can be read as: It is likely that many of the tools used by Woodland people were familiar to their archaic ancestors.


3

Both are correct; however both are from a particular and somewhat refined English dialect (the kind you'd expect to read in a 19th century novel) so finding good illustrative examples is going to be difficult. In this case "would" reflects its relationship with "will", as in intention or determination. The first sentence talks about something that has ...


3

I don't know the precise details of the PL championship, but you are right the choice of "will" or "would" is based on the level of certainty or uncertainty in the prediction. Note the screen shot says "results", plural. That suggests the actual championship winner will depend on the results of (perhaps several) other games, which may not have started yet. ...


3

Backshift in the reporting clause is optional when the time reference of what's being reported is still valid at the time of the report. Examples: They thought that the prison conditions have improved. I heard her say that she is studying business administration. are both correct, as well as: They thought that the prison conditions had ...


3

tl;dr The source cited misses actual distinctions between going to and will, and posits differences that don't obtain. I'm putting this response in an answer because I don't know where else to put it. I compliment the OP for citing a source for answers, but one must take care to select those sources carefully. The author of the grammar book in question and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible