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You're talking about an event manager or event planner. From Wikipedia's article on event management (redirected from event planner): The process of planning and coordinating the event is usually referred to as event planning and which can include budgeting, scheduling, site selection, acquiring necessary permits, coordinating transportation and parking, ...


8

Interesting question. I am a native English speaker and I come across situations like this all of the time; they are very common! There is no one correct way to answer this, but here I would probably use “event organizer.” However, if this term still seems too vague, adding additional context can help the reader understand what kind of service you are ...


4

Event coordinator: What exactly does an event coordinator do? Day-to-day duties often depend on where an event coordinator works and what needs to get done. In general, an event coordinator puts together events, tackling anything from client meetings to cleanup. Responsibilities may include preparing budgets, scouting and booking locations, ...


3

The main difference between soak and drench is that Soak is used for something that absorbs water. (paper, cloth, wood etc) while Drench is used for others, like people etc. Also, according wikidiff, "soak is to be saturated with liquid by being immersed in it while drench is to soak, to make very wet" (but not put/immerse the object in water, rather throw ...


2

Another alternative is to use event host. Hosting differs from event organizing or planning, in that it stresses that they provide the location and are responsible for the party. It is not 100% precise which sense it refers to though (these correspond to 1b and 1a in the definition below). You would likely want to combine it with planning or organizing, as ...


2

It seems as if there really should be some common adjective to describe engineering things -- but, unlike so many other disciplines, there isn't. "Engineerical" is not a word, or at least not one you would use seriously. There are several solutions to this deficit: (As per Lambie's suggestion) rewrite the sentence using nouns: The questions on the ...


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Both examples appear verbose and awkward though sentence structure and word choice always depend on what nuance you want to convey. The thought you seem to want to convey could be rendered for example by Not for the first time, he decided to skip his classes. or He decided, again, not to attend his classes.


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If you're assuming that one of the phrases is not idiomatic and both might not be idiomatic, then you would say Is 'have greater readability than' or 'easier to read than' not idiomatic, or both? It would be even better to repeat the question to make it more clear. Is 'have greater readability than' or 'easier to read than' not idiomatic, or are both ...


1

If I understand your question right, you want to compare two different things (concepts, etc.), but the descriptors that you use for the things are not analogous to each other. That can definitely sound a little weird: "The enormous paw prints in the mud were mistaken for a tiger." "The delightful aromas of frying onions and roasting chicken could ...


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Yes, "characterised by" works fine there. In some cases you can also say "distinguished by," but that option works best when there's at least an implicit contrast. For example, you might say, While the interwar period was marked by economic stagnation, the postwar period was distinguished by productivity gains and rapid growth. You can also rephrase and ...


1

Can you? Yes. Should you? Probably not -- unless there is a good reason to do so. Quoted phrases in an essay are primarily used to cite the exact text of an external source. If you are only citing your own opinion, it can be confusing to set the text apart with quotes, because the reader may naturally assume that you are referring to someone else's ...


1

There are several possibilities, but the closest synthesis of the two sentences in the question (to use the original wording as much as possible) is this: It was not a single occasion/time when she decided not to attend classes. It happened not for the first time that he decided not to attend classes. In short: It was not the first time that he ...


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You can omit who and use supervised, but not without adding a pronoun and punctuation. (And possibly a conjunction.) The reason for this is that the following is an independent clause: ✔ Managers formerly supervised the software engineering groups for the development project. But this is not an independent clause: ✘ Will now be in charge of much ...


1

You are correct that the old lady is speaking about a routine or habit, but she is referring to a routine that she used to have (i.e. in the past), which was in response to actions that you used to do. In the sentence, "I used to stay up every night when you would go out with your friends", you used to go out with your friends and, when you did, she would ...


1

Unless they are asking you to stay near to the door(unlikely), this is a typo. Please keep the door closed at all times Except for when you're going through it obviously (or is it a fire door only for use in fires?) or: Please make sure to close the door You can use close here as it's an instruction to close it, rather that keep it close.


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