2

Although without qualification, 'destiny' means 'fate' or 'final state', it is possible to use the word 'destiny' to discuss events that are now in the past, but which were in the future at some past time. A sweeping historical narrative examines the personalities, events, and political maneuvers that shaped Japan's destiny during the years of World ...


2

"Pulled down" implies some force was applied, and usually means that there was some resistance. For example, you pull down a roller blind. "Took down" is far more gentle. "Grabbed" is an alternative which implies hurriedly taking, but does not imply any resistance.


2

Very interesting question! Finding the right expression in this case seems a little difficult because you want to be "always respectful" and yet "harsh". The meaning of "triggered" in this context is rooted in the modern political usage of the word. And that is why I shall quote the Urban Dictionary (so one can compare it with the alternatives below): (...


2

I don't agree with the person who made the remark, but perhaps among younger people than I it is taken this way. In any case, with the idea that simplest is best, perhaps "upset" is a good substitute. One more thing: we generally give the benefit of the doubt rather than providing it.


2

"Uneven" describes a surface which is not flat, so it isn't quite the right word to describe a chair. You might instead use: unstable wobbly "Wobbly" is the most commonly used. For example, a recent episode of the US TV sitcom Curb Your Enthusiasm featured a recurring anecdote about a "wobbly table": "Nobody likes a wobbly table... I could not live ...


2

Yes you can. Only thing is, don't use a "the". The most common uses are: We are way behind schedule! We are right on schedule! We are well ahead of schedule!


2

That is a permissible construction. It's a little bit more formal than you'd expect in day-to-day life, so if someone said it the implication is that they find the unknown substance disgusting, but it's perfectly acceptable English. A more informal way of saying it would be something like "The pillow's stained with something", "Something's stained the ...


1

Smear and scrub are fine, but ink stains the skin. We would only use stick of a semi-solid substance like mud or porridge, or an object with a sticky surface.


1

In OP's context, preoccupied is the better choice. The pre- prefix implies already, which by further implication suggests there's something else that Lenny should be doing. Being "occupied" usually implies doing something meaningful / productive, whereas being "preoccupied" often means doing or paying attention to something relatively pointless (daydreaming,...


1

Using "push over" when the action is actually pulling would not be correct. You can, however, say "pull over" to mean that you pulled something/someone and it fell over as a result. The definition you quoted is one meaning of "to pull over", but it is not the only meaning. For example, this makes perfect sense: I pulled the chair over and it landed on ...


1

We usually call an all-in-one female garment a dress. A skirt is either a separate lower garment or the part of a dress or coat that hangs below the waist.


1

Question: Is it okay to say "don't step your slippers on the mat"? or maybe "don't step on the mat while wearing your slippers"? Answer: No, it is not. Don't step on the mat in your slippers. Don't walk on the mat in your slippers. Those are the ways it would be said. For items of clothing including shoes, we say: in your shoes. If you are wearing them, ...


1

No. You don't "step" your shoes, slippers or your feet. It sounds like you want to say "don't step on the mat in your slippers".


1

I read the conversation linked in the question. This is part of the comment that you are responding to: hopefully its a culture gap thing but you should reconsider that usage if youre talking to people in North America Since the writer's profile is not filled out, it is not possible to know their place of residency with certainty. However, I know my ...


1

As you observed, the first form you listed is most common. It can be interpreted as having the "in which" from the second form implicit. Alternatively, you can simply treat "ways" as a plural noun: the ways (strategies or patterns of behavior for achieving some goal) that the speaker learned (for the purpose of coping) are the items listed after "include..."....


1

The short answer is that your sentence sounds totally normal and idiomatic to the average contemporary speaker (at least Br.Eng). For the long answer, you could delve into previous posts on might vs may here or on ELU stackexchange.


1

You could say "Though I am in a wheelchair, I won't let it stop me...", but the way you expressed it is good too. "Though I am..." means that I am in a wheelchair now. "I might be in a wheelchair someday..." could be expressing a future possibility, but as you phrased it, it will be taken as meaning that I am in the wheelchair now.


1

I would advise against using words like "loop" or "wrap" - it seems out of context with measurements of time. Time doesn't "loop" - it is continuous. Even when moving from the hour of midnight to one in the morning, this is a continuation of the measurement of time. Similarly, don't use "increase" - because time doesn't "increase" unless you are speaking ...


1

This is only my analysis 1) If numbers in your timer turn around when a minute or an hour elapses , the verb "to flip" would mean this According to Cambridge Dictionary : If something flips, it turns over quickly based on this definition : If it is 23:37 , and you hit the hour button , the display flips to 24:00 . If it is 23:37 , and you hit the ...


1

I think perhaps I got an idea what it is you want to do, but not guaranteed. For the three situations you describe, I make suggestions as follows. the display loops/wraps to 00:37/ The display will show 00:37/ shows 00:37. the display blocks/stays at 23:37/ The display remains at 23:37/ remains at 23:37. the display becomes/rounds to 24:00/ The display ...


1

The context of the statement is Marx's belief that capitalism "would become decreasingly competitive" due to the growth of companies to large size. The author thinks that Marx missed the fact that small companies could flourish among large ones because they could take advantage of new opportunities at much less expense than large ones. An example chosen is ...


1

Most of those options are actually reasonably natural, but you might choose one or another if you wanted to emphasize certain aspects more. The only one that sounds a little strange is #4 ("the body of Mike"). It just sounds a bit unnecessarily wordy (most people would just say "Mike's body" instead) As for which to use when, it's mostly a stylistic thing:...


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