6 votes

Table equivalent of the word booth?

Where I live (USA), a booth corresponds to this definition: AHD booth 2. A seating area in a restaurant with a table and seats whose high backs serve as partitions. M-W booth 2 c. : an enclosed ...
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4 votes

Does "I walked all the way to school" refer to a continuous movement without stops on the way to school?

All the way here means that you covered the whole journey on foot. It says nothing about whether or not you made any stops on the way.
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  • 29.6k
4 votes
Accepted

For my family and I/myself

Technically, for my family and I is not grammatical. It seems to come from a mistaken fear that “me” is not grammatically proper when combined with “and.” In fact, “me” is proper as the object of ...
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  • 26.1k
2 votes
Accepted

Glazed eyes vs. glassy eyes

To a first approximation, they mean the same. In fact, I would say the biggest difference is that syntactically, we're much more likely to use adjectival glassy-eyed and adverbial [with] glazed eyes. ...
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2 votes
Accepted

Word + yet + word

Whenever you use "word1 + yet + word2," the second word is usually a contradiction to the first word in some way. What you are saying is that even though it's word1, it still has some ...
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  • 319
1 vote
Accepted

It is easy/likely for children to be addicted to video games

To answer your question, easy is an appropriate choice of words, as is likely. They are interchangeable in this context. Your sentences, however, are a little awkward in American English. I would ...
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  • 1,400
1 vote

what verb/adjective would describe clickbait headline

"attention-grabbing headline" is the most common trope used in marketing and journalism. The headline was attention grabbing. [notice, no hyphen when it is not adjectival] Another is catchy: ...
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  • 35k
1 vote
Accepted

Succeeding in college often is a challenge for students,______, most college provide services designed to help students

The question bank answer of (a) is wrong. You are correct to say both (c) and (d) are correct. The services are provided mainly because many students have problems, so therefore is the logical answer. ...
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  • 3,052
1 vote

Is it correct to say "I dodged my arm away from his punch"?

Oxford Languages defines dodge as avoid (someone or something) by a sudden quick movement. You may have found some instances of dodge used to mean move a part of the body out of the way, but this is a ...
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1 vote

Is it correct to say "I dodged my arm away from his punch"?

I would say, "He tried to punch my arm, but I dodged him." You weren't dodging your arm: you were dodging him.
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1 vote
Accepted

Just like/just as + complete statement

Technically, because there is a verb after like/as (go in), you should use the conjunction as: You have no reason to come out your apartment, just as I have no reason to go in. Like is typically ...
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  • 1,400
1 vote
Accepted

Outsider vs. Odd-man-out

I would prefer "outsider" as being more formal and therefore fitting better in the style of the context (which itself has minor problems of style) you have given. Also, "odd-men-out&...
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1 vote

Through/via vs. By

Via is definitely inappropriate; it means by way of in the context of making a journey. I'm not quite sure what your sentence means, but I think by feels more idiomatic than through.
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1 vote

Through/via vs. By

The first one is better. The main difference between these two prepositions is, "by" is mostly used when referring to a means of something while "through" is used in relation to a ...
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  • 3,052
1 vote

“on a day” vs “in a day”

The first example: I eat three tablespoons of molasses at most on a day. is not correct. Indeed the word sequence "on a day" is somewhat unusual, and is never used in a construction like ...
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