4

The two words mean different things. Clothes fit you If they are sized correctly for all parts of your body. Clothes suit you if they are of a style etc. that makes them look good on you. It is possible for clothes to fit you badly but suit you well, if a baggy clothing style works well for you. "Fits" should not generally be used with "much" ...


2

Using hyphens in compound adjectives, e.g. a two-seater aircraft, a high-school student, a heavy-metal detector, is considered compulsory in British English, but US English is more lenient, and hyphenation is optional except where ambiguity would arise without a hyphen, or where it is desired to help the reader. If you're unsure, use a hyphen. Hyphens in ...


2

All of those phrases have roughly the same potential meaning when referring to pancakes. However we really only use two phrases in this context. flip a pancake turn a pancake 'Turn the pancake over' is also used, but the word 'over' is redundant and is quite often left out. There is no ambiguity without it so it's not necessary. With other objects ...


2

I think that would be correct (certainly in modern usage), but in my mind it doesn't sound brilliant, especially for more formal writing. BUT as pointed out in comments, this meaning is not very common and should probably be avoided. Alternatives: 'or in other words' 'that is, ...' 'i.e.' (however that wouldn't quite sound right in the context of your ...


2

The verbs are open and close. I open a door, then I close the door. Doors open and close. The past participles are opened and closed. The adjectives are open and closed. The door is open or is closed. (Note that "close" can also be an adjective, but with a different meaning, namely the opposite of far. "The door is close" means the door is nearby, not far ...


1

I would say: The task will be completed in a few weeks


1

I assume you mean "made the chair fall over". The typical way to say it would be "you knocked down the chair". Depending on the exact action, you could also say "you pushed the chair over". In other words, you describe the boy's actions, not trying to force "fall" into the sentence. Just to confuse you, there is difference between "to fall" and "to fell". ...


1

With ‘each other’ the sentence could mean that every pair of things has a link; with ‘one another’ it could mean only that each thing has a link with some other thing. But where this distinction is intended I would expect it to be worded more explicitly.


1

She wishes I were gone. This is the grammatically correct phrase. The other phrase is incorrect from a grammar perspective, although it is used/seen due to "I was" sounding more natural than "I were".


1

"Flip the pancake" is far and away the most common.


1

In robotics, position refers to the (x,y,z) coordinates of an object, while pose refers to both the position (3D) and orientation (3D) of an object.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible