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10 votes

Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be ___ at times

Intimidating may be a good option, as it expresses a small level of personal discomfort at having to "keep up" with such distinguished friends. It's like humbling, but whereas "...
Cristobol Polychronopolis's user avatar
9 votes

Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be ___ at times

Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be demanding at times.
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be ___ at times

Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be _____ at times Is there a precise adjective/phrase that means putting a lot of peer pressure on me that I can fill into the blank? These ...
ryang's user avatar
  • 430
8 votes

Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be ___ at times

Demanding and daunting are both good options, which have already been suggested by others. A further possibility is: Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be taxing at times.
Pilcrow's user avatar
  • 394
4 votes

Do you say "You got the floor muddy" the same way we say "get something wet / dirty"?

To make something muddy is to cause mud to form, as rain on bare earth does. To get something muddy is to cause (already existing) mud to stick to the thing or penetrate into it, as by treading in mud ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
3 votes

Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be ___ at times

Depends on how much pressure involved, but you might say it's overwhelming. That's stronger than most of the terms offered it. It would apply if you thought you might crack under the pressure.
Mary's user avatar
  • 5,249
3 votes
Accepted

How to say when I have a stomach-related long-term problem?

"A stomach ache" is something temporary. Below is an informal way of letting people know you have some kind of ongoing issue with your stomach, and it has arisen recently, perhaps over the ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 128k
3 votes

How to say when I have a stomach-related long-term problem?

Stomach ache adjectives OP described two distinct types of stomach aches and desires to know the English names for each. In my language, if you feel pain in your stomach but it automatically goes ...
James Mathai's user avatar
3 votes

Are "lay the newspaper on the floor" and "spread the newspaper on the floor" interchangeable?

This is something that would depend a lot on the context in the rest of the paragraph. Looking at the definitions of lay from Merriam-Webster and Cambridge dictionaries you could make an argument for ...
generically_named's user avatar
2 votes

Are "lay the newspaper on the floor" and "spread the newspaper on the floor" interchangeable?

Pretty much interchangable because the context would make more difference that the meaning of the words. "lay" suggests flat on the ground "spread" suggests covering a wider area ...
James K's user avatar
  • 225k
2 votes

"Social men" who have entered the real world and experienced lots of social challenges and complexities?

A phrase which matches your description is "man of the world" someone who has a lot of experience of life and can deal with most situations This is not very common in modern talk but does ...
dubious's user avatar
  • 1,154
2 votes

Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be ___ at times

Stressful seems fine, but you could consider also pressurising. Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be [pressurising] at times.
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
2 votes

Is it correct to say "arrange the cup side by side in a row"?

"In a row" means a single line of cups, it says nothing about which way the handles face. You can describe the photo as "cups arranged in a row". Since the cups are basically ...
James K's user avatar
  • 225k
2 votes

Online stores don't have to pay for hefty "rental fees associated with the premises" - Alternatives for the words in quotes

I think it's just called rent, and you can contrast online with brick and mortar. For example: Online stores don't have the high rent that brick and mortar stores do.
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 7,355
2 votes

What word should I use when I want to refer to the different roads that are drawn from one city to other cities and connect them?

If it was between cities it was a road, even though we know that it would be nothing like a modern road. A path is for walking on (or, in modern times, sometimes cycling). A route is the way you get ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 56.2k
2 votes

Is it natural to say "you should've done the math exercise smartly"?

What you have found is a "shortcut". Or a "quick" way to do the problem. You might recommend that she should "work smarter, not harder" But that is clich├ęd. As usual, ...
James K's user avatar
  • 225k
2 votes

Is it natural to say "you should've done the math exercise smartly"?

Sorry, but no. "Smart" can mean "intelligent", but "smartly" means "stylishly", like, "Sally was very smartly dressed". Or it can mean "promptly&...
Jay's user avatar
  • 67.1k
2 votes

Which verb is used for the voluntary termination of degree-awarding powers?

We could consider relinquish: The university relinquishes its degree-awarding powers as a result of discontinuing the field of study. VERB If you relinquish something such as power or control, you ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

Do we use "like crazy" for positive or neutral activities and "like hell" for negative ones?

No, either one can be used for either positive or negative situations. "When I saw the tiger, I ran like crazy." "When I saw the tiger, I ran like hell." "The thief fought ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 67.1k
1 vote

Do you say "You got the floor muddy" the same way we say "get something wet / dirty"?

Yes. You got the floor muddy is absolutely normal and correct. Native speakers use it all the time. The relevant definition is 5c from Mirriam Webster: to cause to be in a certain position or ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
  • 4,563
1 vote

How to say when I have a stomach-related long-term problem?

As you're willing to state that you suffer from chronic pain in the abdominal region, (chronic abdominal pain) just say the name of the medical condition; e.g. It's my ______flaring up. to flare up ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.7k
1 vote

Can we call "an afternoon we hang out with our friends at a shopping mall" "an outing"?

I disagree that an outing has to be outdoors. You could have an outing that takes place indoors, or that's held both inside and outside. I don't think the "out" refers to "outside,"...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
  • 7,355
1 vote

Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be ___ at times

If it takes effort to lavish the well-deserved praise, then you may be exhausted and/or drained. If their personality is demanding, then it may be frustrating and/or a colloquial P.I.T.A. If you're ...
Temp14's user avatar
  • 21
1 vote

Do you say "don't play with fire" to a person who is playing with something that might get him dirty?

I have heard the phrase you're playing with fire used to mean "If you keep doing what you're doing, and what I've warned you may happen does indeed happen, you're going to be in big trouble. Don'...
TimR's user avatar
  • 128k
1 vote

Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be ___ at times

There are many answers that put negative connotations on this - "discouraging", "disheartening" etc. This is not the way I would communicate things. First and foremost, I would be ...
roganjosh's user avatar
  • 369
1 vote

Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be ___ at times

Disheartening I like this one causing someone to lose determination or confidence; discouraging or dispiriting. "seeing her talent was particularly disheartening because I doubt if I'll ever be ...
mikeb's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote

Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be ___ at times

Another option is challenging: "Having friends who are talented is great, but it can also be challenging at times." While it doesn't precisely convey the meaning of "putting a lot of ...
Fabio says Reinstate Monica's user avatar
1 vote

Is it correct to say "arrange the cup side by side in a row"?

We could say Arrange the cups in a row horizontally and with handles towards you. or Arrange the cups in a row (or 'column') vertically in front of you and with handles towards the right (or 'left'). ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar

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