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This is something that can vary depending on where in the English-speaking world you are. There are also some words that are used very precisely within the beverage industry, but perhaps more broadly and imprecisely by the general public. Here are a few terms that apply to unflavored, unsweetened, carbonated water: Carbonated water is not really a special ...


8

There is an honestly almost insane degree of regional variation here, and there is even some dialectal variation in highly localized cases. Carbonated Water: Will usually be understood as water with enough carbon dioxide or carbonic acid dissolved in it to cause it to spontaneously produce small bubbles of carbon dioxide at room temperature. Using the term ‘...


4

Yes those are all correct. There is a great deal of dialect variation (and even "idiolect" variation, I mean variation from person to person, even if they speak the same dialect) "Carbonated water" sounds quite technical, like an scientific document about water types. It is the term used by wikipedia. The consumption of carbonated ...


2

Traveling mate Travel mate Travel-mate Any of those choices are possible, because "travel mate" is not a set phrase found in the dictionary. The word "travel" is in the position of an adjective modifying "mate". The resulting expression means "travel(ing) companion", which is also not found in the dictionary as one ...


2

"It" would be correct. Though better would probably be: Cover the loaves [or rolls, or tortillas or buns etc. ] with a damp cloth to prevent them from drying.


2

These phrases are very similar. Often, more than one will be appropriate. I will try to explain the differences. A. Dry - The most simple. Something wet becomes more or completely dry. B. Dry out - Something that you is wet throughout(e.g. the tip of a marker pen or clothes that have soaked up water) has become completely or almost completely dry. C. Dry off ...


2

Kate has the word in her comment: "Relish" meaning "to enjoy the taste of something" (and figuratively "to enjoy doing something") It doesn't explictly mean "... and so made others hungry", but you can easily add that to your sentence. She relished her meal, and everyone's stomachs began to rumble. Also as a noun (...


1

ansonman. Well, in this case we should use the second one. Why? Well, we must use a preposition that indicates “agent or cause” and “by” is your best option. You can read more information about it in this website: https://www.spanishdict.com/compare/by/from


1

You ask for "common in the language" but none of these movements are common, so the description of them won't be common either. For the first one, crawled is probably fine but if you want to explictly exclude hands then "walked on their knees" For the movement when lying down, again it is very rare to want to descibe this. It depends on ...


1

The usual expression is I can't help thinking that..., meaning it seems to me - I cannot avoid having the opinion that... Whether you use can't or couldn't depends on whether you are referring to the present or the past. It seems odd, though, to use the expression with you said. Surely the speaker knows whether or not the other person said something? A more ...


1

The word you are looking for is not “selective” but “selection”: selection the action or fact of carefully choosing someone or something as being the best or most suitable. So you can say: Only a selection of them.


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This is somewhat a matter of opinion and style. Prepositions can often be used interchangeably in English. "For" is a more direct and unambiguous preposition to use in the example. You use a tool (or a type of indent formatting) for something -- for this type of code to be formatted correctly. You may also use a tool "with" something, ...


1

They might call it any of those, but stroller is the US term. If you were to call this a stroller in the UK it would be very unusual. Your intended area may have its own preference, other names include: buggy pram push chair Baby carriage would be understood but very old fashioned. Which one to use? Choose Stroller in the USA, and either pram or push chair ...


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