23

It's not entirely clear what you mean by "verb of desperate", but if you mean "what is a single verb that means the same as to be desperate?", then there isn't one. To be desperate is as close as you'll get.


22

Maybe "clandestine" or "covert" operation, for adjectives, or "surveillance", using that noun as an adjective.


20

I'm pretty sure it is 'despair'. The Oxford definition of 'desperate' says: Origin: late Middle English (in the sense ‘in despair’): from Latin desperatus ‘deprived of hope’, past participle of desperare (see despair).


18

A stakeout is defined as "a surveillance maintained by the police of an area or a person suspected of criminal activity." You do not use it in combination with the word "operation" - it is a noun in its own right. So you would say, "The cops are doing a stakeout."


11

You ask someone else is they can spare the time for something. Excuse me, could you please spare a few moments of your time? If you refer to yourself I can spare some time to talk to you it makes you sound self-important or condescending. In the context of your loved ones, again it makes it seem that they are unimportant, if you say you can spare some ...


9

He despairs of ever finding a gift his son will really like. He is desperate to find a gift his son will really like. He may really want to find a gift but if he despairs of finding one, he believes he will not. The two sentences mean different things. [despair=to feel despair about something] despair is a noun and a verb. despairing is a noun (gerund) or ...


9

In the U.S. they would be working undercover and you could say, The cops are engaged in undercover surveillance. Clandestine and covert also work but I think undercover is most often used to describe police activities.


8

In the USA the area you are showing is called a "patio" if it's in the back or side of the home. If it's in front it would likely be called a "porch". Your photo appears to show it made of brick but if the raise area was constructed of wood or something that looked like wood you might also call it a "deck". The lower area you ...


7

To spend time means to do something during that time. One can spend time with family, taking a walk, working, idling. To spare time means that something that came up that could use up some of your time. If you spare it some time, you then spend some time on it. The sparing is generally when it's scheduled -- even if it's immediate.


7

Edited answer after OP posted a photo of their own building; original answer follows: Looking at the picture you posted of your building, as a Brit I'd think of area (3) as almost being 3 separate areas - the part in front of your building would just be "steps", the part which is under cover is a "porch" and the part by the pool a "...


5

That hinged part is the lid. I'd understand "Take the lid off". (Even though it could mean "cut it off with sissors") However, the simple expression is "Open the box"/"Close the box". No need to mention lids at all. You could say "lift the lid" if using the word lid is important.


5

"Spend time" is simply a statement. You may have plenty of uncommitted time, and spending some of it with loved ones is just what you do. "Spare time" implies that you really have other things you'd rather do with that time, so you're making a sacrifice to spend it with loved ones.


5

They're effectively opposites that fit together. To spare time is to avoid doing anything (else) for that period of time. To spend time doing something is to occupy yourself with something for that period of time.  (You wouldn't normally speak of ‘spending time’ without specifying what you were doing.) So you can spare some time in order to spend it on ...


5

The "base in a house across the street" is called a stakeout.


5

Yes, art and art form can be interchangeable, though they aren't identical. Art can be used not just for types of artistic expression, but for individual works of art as well, whereas art form specifically refers to some kind of practice or medium of creating art. For example: Painting, photography, sculpting, and dancing are art forms. A specific painting, ...


4

I think the way desperation manifests itself in action depends upon the nature of the desperation. For example, you might vacillate or prevaricate if you're desperate to make a decision, but you might lust or crave if you're desperate to possess someone or something.


4

I think that "Developing a hunchback" is the right answer. I don't think "getting a hunchback" is idiomatically correct. When I googled the phrase "Getting a hunchback," the only thing I could find with the world "get" and "Hunchback" together was this video which had in its description the phrase "get ...


3

Desperate describes a condition or state of being so its verb definition would have to be "existing in a condition of desperation", which doesn't yet exist. Therefore, you'd have to make one up—which you could, because that's how words are made. The dictionary is not a rule book, it's a record of common usage. Taxonomy doesn't have a verb form ...


3

"Police checkpoint" would seem to be the best expression. The closing of lanes and forcing cars to stop is called a "roadblock". The purpose of the roadblock is to allow police to run a checkpoint. (a traffic break is something else, see the relevant wikipage)


3

“coworkers” implies the people that you work with, hence “co-“. “colleague” could refer to anyone in a similar position or field (“league”), even if you have limited or no interaction with them. If the cake is intended primarily for your friends at your office, I would use “coworkers”.


3

"Coworkers" is okay, but it tends to suggest people who are at a comparable level with you. So if you are a programmer at Microsoft, your coworkers might include other programmers, and perhaps other "office workers". But you probably wouldn't include Bill Gates as a coworker, or people who work in different locations. Then again, if you ...


3

These examples are all fine and would be understood by most native speakers. "You have a little temperature" is OK because in this case temperature is not countable, it's referring to the degree of fever. One can have a little temperature (fever) the same way one can have a little dirt on one's nose. You would not say you have "two fevers"...


3

While I generally agree with using "patio" or "porch" for raised or paved areas next to house, I don't think that quite applies to the areas in question. I would expect those terms to be used more for areas that are an extension of a building, rather than a fundamental part of it. There also needs to be stuff there. For the small raised ...


3

To me, pack implies a common purpose or goal between the members of the group. Bunch is more just describing that they are together, but in a more haphazard way. For example, in a jail you may find a bunch of thieves because they were all caught for different reasons. On the other hand, a pack of thieves are all working together. The connotation is similar ...


2

Perhaps it's a regional practice but I can't say that I have ever heard a native speaker say "chew on your food" or "suck on your thumb" in the sense that you are using here. The common usage in American English is "chew your food" as a parent might say to a child or similarly "suck your thumb". For most native ...


2

Being stationary concerns movement from point A to point B, while still refers to movement in-place. Water boiling in a kettle, or a child sitting in a chair waving its arms around are stationary (they stay in one place, without changing position in space), but not still (as they do move in-place). If you're sitting in a wheelchair that's rolling down a hill,...


2

I think condemned should be reserved for a more abstract usage here and sentence should be used instead since it refers to a specific sentencing (of 20 years). Unequivocally condemned by society, he was sentenced to the nation's most notorious prison where he paid the price of his actions with twenty years of his life. That said, I'd opt for the second ...


2

Don't lean too heavily on logical decisions when dealing with English. Both of your examples are well-written, and perfectly normal usage. To my mind, your first example, using the singular form, is more common, but only slightly, and is a perfect example of how you can rewrite one sentence into another form.


2

The meaning of the phrases is about the same, but "leak out" seems more sinister, so maybe it fits the conspiratorial scenario a tiny bit better.


2

I do not think either is correct. Decision of the Presidium of the Higher Attestation Commission of Ukraine dated the 22 December 2010. would be more normal. The phrase date from is used in a different context. You might say His success dates from the time when he appointed a new coach. I do not think date of is used at all in a verbal sense but as ...


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