90

You can is giving permission. If that is the context - they have asked permission for something - it is fine (though you may is regarded as more polite). But when you are requesting something, you can is very condescending. It is something you say to a subordinate or servant, not to an independent person providing a service.


82

In my experience the verb 'bat' is often used for this: The cat is batting the decorations hanging from the Christmas tree. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bat#Verb: (intransitive) To strike or swipe as though with a bat. The cat batted at the toy. As noted by others, pawing is also a descriptive choice. I would recommend either verb over punching (...


71

I think most Brits would say, "Put the kettle on", with both the electricity and the water taken for granted. It's what we used to say even before we had electricity, and it was enshrined in the nursery rhyme of circa 1800, "Polly put the kettle on," whose deathless lyrics are: Polly put the kettle on Polly put the kettle on Polly put the kettle on ...


52

Both usages are acceptable to describe the room you describe. Restroom is probably used more often due to the environment where those larger, several stalls, several sinks, bathrooms exist. Restroom is the more formal word. Your first day of work you would be more likely to ask your boss where the restroom is. Bathroom is the more casual word. You might ...


44

Server: Are you ready to order? a. Client: Yes. Can you give me hamburger and chips, please? b. Client: Yes. You can give me hamburger and chips (NO) 1 b. To tell someone to give you something, is considered rude and very bad mannered when ordering food or beverages in an establishment. Server: Are you ready to order? Client: Yes. Could/may ...


40

The first word that came to my mind was swatting. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/swat#Verb, with the given example The cat swatted at the feather.


32

Punching involves bending the arm and striking out forcefully with the closed fist. A cat can't make either of those movements in the way a man would. A cat playing with a dangling object usually bats it sideways with its paw. You could simply use pawing.


31

If you look at the graphic you attached to the question, you'll see the answer already provided. At a supermarket, where you've already paid, you get a receipt: [Merriam-Webster] 1 a : a writing acknowledging the receiving of goods or money It's only at a restaurant, for example, when you're given a statement of what you ate and how much you still owe,...


30

This answer is written from my perspective as an American. I think that usually, saying "you can" is likely to sound rude. If you say "You can get me the check," it may sound like you're sarcastically saying, "I want the check, but since you haven't given me the check, you must have been unaware of the fact that you can get me the check." On the other hand,...


28

I wouldn't use "white glass"; just look it up on Google, that means something made of glass but with a white tint, and you can't see through that kind of glass. The glass in a household mirror is transparent, but since all glass in those kind of mirrors is transparent, you don't need to mention it. In fact, they all contain glass, so even saying &...


28

This is something that can vary depending on where in the English-speaking world you are. There are also some words that are used very precisely within the beverage industry, but perhaps more broadly and imprecisely by the general public. Here are a few terms that apply to unflavored, unsweetened, carbonated water: Carbonated water is not really a special ...


23

It's not entirely clear what you mean by "verb of desperate", but if you mean "what is a single verb that means the same as to be desperate?", then there isn't one. To be desperate is as close as you'll get.


22

It sounds much more correct to use "to", as saying "at", to me, sounds like you are "coming back" in terms of a "comeback", as though the door has insulted you, and now you're "going back at" it. It's as though you are attacking the door in some way. Also, I don't know what the context is, but I imagine that in the vast majority of cases you'd actually be ...


22

Maybe "clandestine" or "covert" operation, for adjectives, or "surveillance", using that noun as an adjective.


20

This may be a regional thing, but speaking as an American: I'd probably say "please put on the kettle". This doesn't make much literal sense -- put what on the kettle? -- but it's a common idiom. Or, "please start the kettle". Or more generally: "please make some tea". Sure, this doesn't specify to use a kettle, but that would likely be assumed. As ...


20

I'm pretty sure it is 'despair'. The Oxford definition of 'desperate' says: Origin: late Middle English (in the sense ‘in despair’): from Latin desperatus ‘deprived of hope’, past participle of desperare (see despair).


19

The phrasings that are most idiomatic to me (British) would be: Could/can you put the kettle on, please? Could/can you boil the kettle, please?


19

A mirror is usually referred to as "silvered glass", since it was often made by depositing silver nitrate on one side, as the Wikipedia entry describes. "White glass" would (to me) be more an antique glass called "milk glass", because it's milky white. "Transparent glass" is, well, a window.


18

When you buy a new car, you're supposed to: drive at a variety of different speeds avoid hard acceleration avoid long drives at the same speed (such as on the highway) In American English, this is called the break-in period for the car, or more specifically for the car engine. This term is commonly used for machinery. The break-in period is the time in ...


18

A stakeout is defined as "a surveillance maintained by the police of an area or a person suspected of criminal activity." You do not use it in combination with the word "operation" - it is a noun in its own right. So you would say, "The cops are doing a stakeout."


14

One common term for this is batting or batting at. When used with a cat (or other animal) this means hitting or tapping at something with the paw. The cat is batting at the decorations hanging from the Christmas tree. Describing a cat as "batting" or "batting at" another cat or an object means the cat is striking or tapping with its paw, but not so ...


14

Meanings Brutal Brutal is the word most associated with violence here. When old McDonald kills a cow he can: Give it an overdose of sleeping drugs to gently kill it Cut it up with a chainsaw, smash it t pieces with a slegehammer, etc Method 2 is brutal. It involves a lot of (unnecessary and excessive) violence. If you know Mortal Kombat, you probably now ...


14

This is really hard to answer because it depends on the speaker's and the listener's point of view. It can also depend on their imagined points of view at the future time the action is planned to happen. I will go to the office and then go back home. The speaker and listener are both away from home and away from the office. Or, the listener will not be at ...


13

While "personality" is usually applied to persons, it can be applied to other things as well. Organisations and animals can be said to have "personality", meaning the things that make them distinctive - moods, characteristics etc. Animality is something different, meaning the characteristics associated with being an animal. A person can have animality if ...


13

From the point of view of a person at your home, you are "coming home". From the point of view of a person at your office, you are "going home". What about your own point of view as you go? It could be either, depending on how you are thinking of it.


12

The author suggests that viruses began as a process in living cells (integrated, but subordinate to the cell) This process became faulty, and the virus somehow separated from the cell (a "remainder"). This cannot now be re-integrated and become a functioning part (or "subordinate moment") of a healthy cell These words are not being used normally, and I ...


11

an attorney in AmE is the same as a lawyer. In the UK, lawyers are barristers OR solicitors. Barristers argue cases in court. Solicitors do the preparatory legal work and handle other non-court matters. The words attorney and lawyer are interchangeable in AmE. Prosecution has nothing to do with it. To be lawyer (attorney aka legal counsel), you have to ...


11

In the US, both the terms restroom and bathroom will be used for facilities in public spaces, commercial buildings, and office spaces. So will the terms toilet and washroom. The frequency that these terms will be used in conversation are about equal. There will be slight degrees of difference in the frequency of their use depending on geographic region, ...


11

The word used for this in English is form. "Presentation" is a false cognate. The Wikipedia page on the concept here used the longer term "dosage form," but in practice we wouldn't use such a specific phrase unless we had to disambiguate with other meanings of the word.


11

You ask someone else is they can spare the time for something. Excuse me, could you please spare a few moments of your time? If you refer to yourself I can spare some time to talk to you it makes you sound self-important or condescending. In the context of your loved ones, again it makes it seem that they are unimportant, if you say you can spare some ...


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