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102

Style guides advise us to use square brackets when we have to change something about a quotation to make it fit grammatically with the sentence where we're using the quotation. Usually, in a case like this, it just means that the capitalization is being changed. For example, David Grubb might have literally said When she overdosed, it literally scared ...


84

IKEA is just the brand name, or business name, of a global business; it's a name just like "Apple" or "Google" or "John's Grocery Store". A person who founds a business can give it any name they want (so long as no-one else legally controls that name). The founder of IKEA was a Swedish businessman called Ingvar Kamprad. He made up the name by using his ...


74

IKEA furniture is sold as kits. Most buyers save money by assembling the furniture themselves. Most of the instructions are in the form of pictures, with no words.


48

"Run under" is not an established expression: this writer has invented it, to make the point that most victims of an accident end up above the car, not under it. If this idea gets picked up, it may become an established expression; but at present, if you used the phrase without this context, people would probably not understand you. Edit: Roger Willcocks ...


39

It's internet slang for dog: Doggo is an internet slang term for dog, which is often associated with the word pupper in various ironic meme communities online. (Know Your Meme) I guess you can think of it as a humorous way to say dog. I've never heard anyone say this in person, but I imagine that there is a very small number that do (like LOL) in ...


32

Brackets appear in quotes whenever the author changed the text of the original quote. Sometimes the author will put "[...]" in brackets to indicate that some text has been removed, for example. Here, the author has changed the letter "I" in the quote, probably from a lowercase "i" so that the beginning of the sentence was capitalized. The original quote ...


28

There's the expression hang up the phone. But there may be others, more fitting for modern phones.


25

It's a pun, not correct English. The proper idiom is "Nice to meet you" but the character is throwing wheat crackers, so he substitutes the rhyming word (meet/wheat) to make a joke.


22

It's just an example of what the manual looks like. i.e. it can be compared to the looks of an IKEA manual. They could probably have written LEGO-like, but went with a brand that is (more)known for their self-assembly manuals, that is without any words but clear illustrations. To illustrate: IKEA: Lego:


16

Dictionary.com says that a rostrum is the platform and not the strange item of furniture, so you would stand 'on' the rostrum. The strange item of furniture is a lectern. You certainly don't stand 'on' it. According to Ngrams, standing 'at' or 'behind' a/the lectern are both possible. If there is a difference, standing 'at' a lectern gives you a little bit ...


16

The key to understanding this comes in the article's next two sentences, which I will abridge here: We’ve entered the lottery for years now, hoping each time get lucky. And every year, we came up snake eyes. Of course snake eyes means a bad roll in dice, and zilch is slang for "nothing." So, the writer is saying: Year after year, we got nothing. ...


15

Brackets are used to indicated text that has been added or modified in a quote, usually to make it fit the grammar in a sentence. In this case, in the original quote "it" was not the first word of the sentence and so would not be capitalized. But they left something off at the beginning, and so they had to capitalize the "i". To show that this is not quite ...


15

Let's say you are holding a meeting, and there are 10 chairs, but only 9 people show up. Then you can say: I seems like we have one extra chair. It is available but nobody is sitting in it. But if 11 people show up, then you can say to the 11th person: Please wait a minute, I will get a spare chair from the storeroom. It is available, but there is ...


14

The Cambridge Dictionary provides different definitions of waking as a noun and as an adjective. The noun meaning relates to the moment of waking. In this context, the word is used as an adjective, and so the adjectival definition is relevant: used to refer to a period of time or an experience during which you are awake. According to this definition, ...


13

I don't think this is a use of the expression "long past". I think it is just the two words "long" and "past" being used consecutively. In soccer, you will often hear people talking about playing (or kicking) the ball "long" (or "short") to distinguish controlled passes to get around enemy players from more speculative balls aiming at shifting play to a ...


12

Neither is wrong, but your use of "extra" is what I would expect. "Spare" is fine, but I would use "extra" in that case. As a native speaker (primarily American English with significant influences from British English), I tend to think of "spare" by the first meaning typically listed: kept in reserve, as for possible use dictionary.com kept as ...


12

Screen clipping and snipping are synonymous in this context, and both are used by Microsoft. All copies of Microsoft Windows from version 7 onwards will display this behaviour. While the built-in screenshot tool in Windows 7 and up is called the Snipping tool, a functionally identical tool is found in Microsoft Office programs under the heading Screen ...


11

"Long past" and "distant past" are usually used to discuss time, not distance. "Well past" can be used to discuss either time or distance. As Weather Vane suggests, "far past" is usually used to discuss distance, not time. The "corners" of soccer fields are important in the game. For example, "corner kicks" often result in goals. Thus, it is not clear ...


10

The simple answer is that it's perfectly normal English. As others have pointed out, "I feel like eating" isn't really a direct answer to the question, but indirect answers are the kind of thing you can do in any language. The more comfortable you get with English, the more you can play around with words to say pretty much anything: Albert: Are you ...


9

First of all, to address your point #2 (that there were many other people in the church), we usually use the expressions, "I was in church", or "I went to church" (no article) when you mean that you were attending a worship service. "I was at the church" is just a statement of location. You were at a particular church (not even necessarily inside the ...


8

You used the word "far", that's also good in ... it was amazing to see how one of them could kick the ball far past the corner. If you want to convey that the game is in the street, you can qualify "corner". ... it was amazing to see how one of them could kick the ball far past the street corner.


7

Another possible alternative (of She hung up the phone) is: (Honey,) she has ended the call. A real example around the web: She thinks she has ended the call at this point and then says to her colleague: ... (Mirror Online) Most of our phones, smart or not, usually have a button with an icon of a phone handset, often in red, sometimes on red. This is ...


7

No, to answer your question bluntly. Those ideas are history now. [That's the idiomatic expression: to be history]. History has many stories to tell. In fact, much of history are accounts (or stories) told my historians or by people who have experienced some aspect of it. Some are true, others not. The whole story of the JFK assassination is not yet ...


6

Your first option sounds fine. "Thanks for your hope" doesn't sound right at all. They're also sort of implying the question of "Did you enjoy your holiday?" so you could just answer that question and it would sound good. I hope you have enjoyed your holiday. Thanks, I had a great time!


6

The verb update is fine, but that usually means that you are changing a number from an older valid number to a newer one. You could use the verb correct instead: "I need your help to correct my contact number" This would mean that the number they have in the system now is incorrect, whereas using update could mean the current number was correct at one ...


6

The correct answer is evident. The reason is that evident means ascertained through evidence - the submission to the competition was some evidence (a demonstration) that the person has a great deal of talent and potential. In this situation, using surprising would be very rude, because it would indicate the judge is surprised the person has talent and ...


6

A crippled limb means the person is not able to fully use the limb for some reason (perhaps due to an injury, illness, or birth defect). Words are flexible so this may not always hold true, but, generally speaking, injured may imply a full recovery is expected, while crippled may imply a more permanent disability. A broken limb simply means the bone has ...


6

No place to go. There is no place, period. It does not imply there once was a place to go. No place left to go. There was once a place to go and now there isn't one. There used to be places or a place to go. There's no sugar left. Meaning: There was some sugar and now there isn't any. I do understand how it might be difficult to explain this if one has ...


6

I can't remember ever seeing this exact combination, but I don't think that is what the book is trying to teach. Learners may think that Yes/No questions must always be answered with "Yes", or "No". But if you actually see how people talk, they often don't respond like that. Instead they continue the conversation. So you could have Are you hungry? Well,...


5

Hang up and put down are hold overs from a time when phones were two piece devices. Given the advent of one-piece hand-held smartphones and touch technology, pressing the end call button is what people usually do these days to disconnect or end a call. The popular end call button has been stylised to have an outline of a two-piece phone's handset and is ...


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