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83 votes
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What does IKEA-like mean?

IKEA is just the brand name, or business name, of a global business; it's a name just like "Apple" or "Google" or "John's Grocery Store". A person who founds a business can give it any name they ...
TechnoCat's user avatar
  • 2,220
75 votes

What does IKEA-like mean?

IKEA furniture is sold as kits. Most buyers save money by assembling the furniture themselves. Most of the instructions are in the form of pictures, with no words.
Jasper's user avatar
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48 votes
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What is the difference between "run over" and "run under" in the context of car accident?

"Run under" is not an established expression: this writer has invented it, to make the point that most victims of an accident end up above the car, not under it. If this idea gets picked up, it may ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
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38 votes
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Help me understand the word "Doggo" in this image

It's internet slang for dog: Doggo is an internet slang term for dog, which is often associated with the word pupper in various ironic meme communities online. (Know Your Meme) I guess you can ...
Em.'s user avatar
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35 votes
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"They had to move the interview to the new year." What does "the new year" mean here?

Used in this kind of context, "new year" idiomatically means a short time into the next calendar year. It isn't a specific date and it doesn't have to be January, but it tends to only be ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k
28 votes
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What does "the money was the chips" mean?

This quote is taken from his book "Where the Money Was," in the chapter "Sutton's Law." A few sentences before the quote, he says of the other "because that's where the money ...
AjimOthy's user avatar
  • 396
26 votes
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Is the 'a nice' in 'a nice to have' grammatical?

Punctuation. The expressions "nice to have" and "must have(s)" should be seen as individual units, they are both fixed phrases and we can achieve this by using hyphens. As the ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
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25 votes
Accepted

What is the meaning of the expression 'nice to wheat you'?

It's a pun, not correct English. The proper idiom is "Nice to meet you" but the character is throwing wheat crackers, so he substitutes the rhyming word (meet/wheat) to make a joke.
relaxing's user avatar
  • 2,436
22 votes

What does IKEA-like mean?

It's just an example of what the manual looks like. i.e. it can be compared to the looks of an IKEA manual. They could probably have written LEGO-like, but went with a brand that is (more)known for ...
Viktor Mellgren's user avatar
19 votes

"We're stuck between floors two and three". Is the definite article implied?

I don't think there is such a thing as "laziness" in grammar. You can't just omit things in the middle of a sentence because you feel lazy and have a grammatically correct sentence. The reason why ...
Michael Rybkin's user avatar
19 votes

What does "the money was the chips" mean?

An alternative, again treating "chips" as "poker chips" would simply be treating the money as a way of keeping score, rather than something valuable in and of itself.
SoronelHaetir's user avatar
15 votes

The difference between 'extra chair' and 'spare chair'

Let's say you are holding a meeting, and there are 10 chairs, but only 9 people show up. Then you can say: I seems like we have one extra chair. It is available but nobody is sitting in it. But ...
user3169's user avatar
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14 votes
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What does the phrase 'waking thoughts' mean?

The Cambridge Dictionary provides different definitions of waking as a noun and as an adjective. The noun meaning relates to the moment of waking. In this context, the word is used as an adjective, ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 60k
14 votes

Is this use of the expression "long past" correct?

I don't think this is a use of the expression "long past". I think it is just the two words "long" and "past" being used consecutively. In soccer, you will often hear people talking about playing (or ...
Especially Lime's user avatar
12 votes
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The difference between 'extra chair' and 'spare chair'

Neither is wrong, but your use of "extra" is what I would expect. "Spare" is fine, but I would use "extra" in that case. As a native speaker (primarily American English with significant influences ...
T.J. Crowder's user avatar
12 votes
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What do you see if you enter 'clip' in the Windows 10 Search Box or Cortana?

Screen clipping and snipping are synonymous in this context, and both are used by Microsoft. All copies of Microsoft Windows from version 7 onwards will display this behaviour. While the built-in ...
Werrf's user avatar
  • 5,610
12 votes
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Is this use of the expression "long past" correct?

"Long past" and "distant past" are usually used to discuss time, not distance. "Well past" can be used to discuss either time or distance. As Weather Vane suggests, "far past" is usually used to ...
Jasper's user avatar
  • 24.3k
12 votes

Is the 'a nice' in 'a nice to have' grammatical?

In this example the whole "a nice to have" is the noun, rather than just the "a nice" part. I'd probably hyphenate it myself – "a nice-to-have" – to help clear up any ...
Showsni's user avatar
  • 1,835
11 votes

Hospital vs. Clinic vs. Polyclinic etc

In American English, it's common to refer to such a place as "the doctor's office" or even just "the doctor". Such places may be officially called something like "Offices of Dr. Jones, MD". The word "...
Nattgew's user avatar
  • 307
10 votes

Question: "Are you hungry?" Answer: "I feel like eating."

The simple answer is that it's perfectly normal English. As others have pointed out, "I feel like eating" isn't really a direct answer to the question, but indirect answers are the kind of thing you ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.4k
9 votes

The use of "I" and "we" used in the same sentence and other questions

First of all, to address your point #2 (that there were many other people in the church), we usually use the expressions, "I was in church", or "I went to church" (no article) when you mean that you ...
Lorel C.'s user avatar
  • 11.6k
9 votes

"We're stuck between floors two and three". Is the definite article implied?

We were between floors when the elevator broke down. [i.e. not specific and plural] No the. idiom: to be between two things in the plural. However, if you then want to be specific, you would say: ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.5k
8 votes

Is this use of the expression "long past" correct?

You used the word "far", that's also good in ... it was amazing to see how one of them could kick the ball far past the corner. If you want to convey that the game is in the street, you can ...
Weather Vane's user avatar
  • 16.6k
7 votes
Accepted

"story" without article meaning "past"

No, to answer your question bluntly. Those ideas are history now. [That's the idiomatic expression: to be history]. History has many stories to tell. In fact, much of history are accounts (or ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.5k
6 votes

surprising vs. evident in a multiple choice question

The correct answer is evident. The reason is that evident means ascertained through evidence - the submission to the competition was some evidence (a demonstration) that the person has a great deal ...
NibblyPig's user avatar
  • 1,218
6 votes
Accepted

"Cripple" vs "Break"

A crippled limb means the person is not able to fully use the limb for some reason (perhaps due to an injury, illness, or birth defect). Words are flexible so this may not always hold true, but, ...
J.R.'s user avatar
  • 110k
6 votes
Accepted

What’s the difference?

No place to go. There is no place, period. It does not imply there once was a place to go. No place left to go. There was once a place to go and now there isn't one. There used to be places or a ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.5k
6 votes

Question: "Are you hungry?" Answer: "I feel like eating."

I can't remember ever seeing this exact combination, but I don't think that is what the book is trying to teach. Learners may think that Yes/No questions must always be answered with "Yes", or "No". ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
5 votes

Puddle vs Pool in different cases

Living in Australia, I know puddle is a common word and often used. This may be different for other places. With regards to your second question, it generally depends on size. Many definitions of ...
Cantalouping's user avatar
  • 2,821
5 votes

Why Red Riding Hood?

Capes and hoods are not identical. They can be worn together, but they are separate pieces of clothing. Capes are sleeveless cloaks, often associated with superhero attire. Long, flowing pieces of ...
Cantalouping's user avatar
  • 2,821

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