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"In a way that caused him to feel despair." The friend's going back on his word is the reason for his despair, and so (by definition) it contributes much to that feeling. Much to his surprise and much to his dismay are also common variations on the same formula, as well as their plainer versions without "much": to his surprise and to his ...


3

The phrase "much to his despair" is a variation of the phrase "be the despair of". This sentence is saying that because this person's friend went back on his word (going back on your word is when you break a promise or you fail to uphold a commitment you made), it caused this person's friend despair. In this sentence, "despair" ...


3

The choice depends on whether you are targeting the statement at individuals or at the group. So you might say: Anybody who needs to use the toilet should go before the show. Here you are thinking of individual actions and any is the better fit. On the other hand, you might say: Everybody who bought a ticket for the show will get a refund. Here you are ...


2

Regarding the usage of to: to preposition 2 b —used as a function word to indicate the result of an action or a process // broken all to pieces // go to seed // to their surprise, the train left on time (M-W) to preposition 2.2 Governing a phrase expressing someone's reaction to something. ‘to her astonishment, he smiled’ ‘Much to his surprise, this small ...


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The answer, from usingenglish.com: "When paper money is new, it's referred to as being crisp, not all folded and wrinkled."


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I have never seen went burgled. Using went in such a way is not idiomatic. Here's the ones I can think of: went... hungry, crazy, south, away, missing, "the way of" (the dinosaurs, etc.) A few of those have in common that the action occurs due to neglect of some sort, and your house might be burgled because you are not there, but it sounds very ...


1

Yes, that is a correct use of better. Merriam-Webster calls that sense of "better" an auxiliary verb, with the same meaning as "had better": Merriam-Webster "better" (5) better auxiliary verb had better example: you better hurry Cambridge provides an explanation of "had better": Cambridge Dictionary "had better&...


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