84

IKEA is just the brand name, or business name, of a global business; it's a name just like "Apple" or "Google" or "John's Grocery Store". A person who founds a business can give it any name they want (so long as no-one else legally controls that name). The founder of IKEA was a Swedish businessman called Ingvar Kamprad. He made up the name by using his ...


74

IKEA furniture is sold as kits. Most buyers save money by assembling the furniture themselves. Most of the instructions are in the form of pictures, with no words.


22

It's just an example of what the manual looks like. i.e. it can be compared to the looks of an IKEA manual. They could probably have written LEGO-like, but went with a brand that is (more)known for their self-assembly manuals, that is without any words but clear illustrations. To illustrate: IKEA: Lego:


13

I don't think this is a use of the expression "long past". I think it is just the two words "long" and "past" being used consecutively. In soccer, you will often hear people talking about playing (or kicking) the ball "long" (or "short") to distinguish controlled passes to get around enemy players from more speculative balls aiming at shifting play to a ...


12

Screen clipping and snipping are synonymous in this context, and both are used by Microsoft. All copies of Microsoft Windows from version 7 onwards will display this behaviour. While the built-in screenshot tool in Windows 7 and up is called the Snipping tool, a functionally identical tool is found in Microsoft Office programs under the heading Screen ...


11

"Long past" and "distant past" are usually used to discuss time, not distance. "Well past" can be used to discuss either time or distance. As Weather Vane suggests, "far past" is usually used to discuss distance, not time. The "corners" of soccer fields are important in the game. For example, "corner kicks" often result in goals. Thus, it is not clear ...


10

The simple answer is that it's perfectly normal English. As others have pointed out, "I feel like eating" isn't really a direct answer to the question, but indirect answers are the kind of thing you can do in any language. The more comfortable you get with English, the more you can play around with words to say pretty much anything: Albert: Are you ...


9

First of all, to address your point #2 (that there were many other people in the church), we usually use the expressions, "I was in church", or "I went to church" (no article) when you mean that you were attending a worship service. "I was at the church" is just a statement of location. You were at a particular church (not even necessarily inside the ...


8

You used the word "far", that's also good in ... it was amazing to see how one of them could kick the ball far past the corner. If you want to convey that the game is in the street, you can qualify "corner". ... it was amazing to see how one of them could kick the ball far past the street corner.


6

I can't remember ever seeing this exact combination, but I don't think that is what the book is trying to teach. Learners may think that Yes/No questions must always be answered with "Yes", or "No". But if you actually see how people talk, they often don't respond like that. Instead they continue the conversation. So you could have Are you hungry? Well,...


4

@Andrew's answer is correct, however just adding my perspective. While 'really' is indeed an intensifier, I do believe it is often used as a way to soften the impact of a statement. Ironically, the effect is almost to 'de-intensify' a statement which might be considered to be giving bad news. To add emphasis: I really don't want to go to the party. To ...


4

The purpose of language is communication. The key question here is who you are communicating with. If your readers or listeners are familiar with Western culture, when you say "I went to church last Sunday" they already know that (1) Sunday is the main day each week when religious ceremonies takes place in churches (2) These ceremonies involve a group of ...


4

"Keep up" is a phrasal verb. It has various meanings. "Upkeep" (normally written as one word) is a noun. It normally has only one meaning, which is related to one of the meanings of "keep up": the cost or effort of maintaining something. I find "maintain the upkeep" unidiomatic, but otherwise, yes, "upkeep" here is the noun matching the particular meaning ...


4

You could say any of the following: X happens every other month. X takes place every other month, starting January. From Cambridge: every other something: not each one in a series, but every two. Example: The conference used to be held every year, but now it takes place every other year. We get together every other Saturday for lunch.


3

I think they have different meanings, "I sit and watch the children play" means she/he sits while watching the children play. "I sit and watch the children to play" this one means she/he watches the children as a way to play herself/himself, which is weird and doesn't make too much sense


3

As your friend's question implies they will give you a piece of fruit, "suggestion" does not fit very well. "Suggestion" would be appropriate if your friend gave you advice on a course of action, but not if they are offering you something tangible. On the other hand, "invitation" suggests something more than a piece of fruit - if your friend offered to buy ...


3

It is not a direct answer to the question asked. Literally, it does not answer the question at all: for example, someone might prefer to eat rather than to continue an awkward conversation. It is a fact, however, that people do answer questions indirectly. Do you want to go to the movies? Let's go see the re-run of Flash Dance! Whether mimicking ...


3

There is no implicit suggestion that the person will fail, only that it will be difficult. Instead it suggests that success is possible if the person works hard. It is possible to use "going to" for the future tense instead of "will". The example with the marriage is odd. It seems to suggest that his bride will be difficult, but the context seems odd. It ...


3

First of all, it would probably be simpler if you left it as multiple sentences. However, if you're set on not doing so, you could try something like the following: When I went to church last Sunday, a large explosion that occurred outside was heard by me and everybody else inside. Note that the main clause of the sentence has been turned into a passive ...


3

make amends (v): to do something to correct a mistake that one has made or a bad situation that one has caused Your first example of this phrase is fairly standard, and so requires no additional explanation. You are correct, and it should be "pray for God's forgiveness". I assume it's an unintentional error. Janis Joplin's use of "make amends" is not ...


3

In the way I see it, is not about feelings, is about conditional or hypothetical situations, comparing to someone else. "If I were you, I would do the same for her" "If you win the lottery, I will do the same as you, buying it everyday"


2

If this is a multiple-choice English examination question, I would go for "interest" as it is the most polite and gracious of the options you give; but actually, both the first two options sound very formal and not the sort of thing a native speaker would say to a real friend. Probably more common and slightly less formal is: "I'm fine, thanks for asking"...


2

It might be an improvement to phrase your sentence slightly differently: I have completed the certification program but not yet received the certificate that I expected within 24 hours. May I ask you kindly to follow this up? The expression can you assist is perfectly correct. My phraseology is just a little more polite. The phrase but after 24 hours ...


2

The word "a priori" is quite often used in philosophical debate. The term a priori is used in philosophy to indicate deductive reasoning. The term is Latin, meaning “from what comes before”, refering to that which comes before experience. A priori is in contrast to a posteriori, which is a term used to indicate inductive reasoning. In short, ...


2

Well, for starters there's really nothing polite about Person B's response. "I don't have any interest at all," and, "I don't really have to see it," are both fairly brusque, and likely to hurt Person A's feelings. This is not specific to English -- in any language, when you don't want to do something, but are too polite to say so, you have to make up some ...


2

To "have a thing" for, or about, something or someone can mean, informally, a passion, liking, interest or preference. You could have a thing for blondes, chocolate, Fiat cars, Mozart, or swimming. have a thing for informal Have a strong liking for. ‘I think he has a bit of a thing for you’ ‘She's the young hotshot of the woman's tennis ...


2

"I have some sort of a thing for x", or (as I've heard more frequently) "I've got a thing about x", means that x has some kind of emotional importance or interest for me. It can be negative: "I have a thing about gophers. I hate them because they eat my tulips." But usually it is a positive interest, and often romantic, especially if you use the word "...


2

to work the bars means: to go from bar to bar and sideshow to sideshow In other words, to be looking for something like sex or companionship by wandering around at night in those kinds of place. The Twilight Zone was (and is again) a famous TV series where weird things happen. So the twilight zone has come to mean something like: an eerie or odd space in ...


2

When you "work in a bar," you are typically employed by the bar or have permission to be there working an organized activity, like playing in a band. "Working" a location or group of people treats the people or place as an object. It refers to some kind of informal, sometimes sketchy activity. For example, working as a pool shark, gambler, pickpocket, or ...


2

To take issue with means to argue with, disagree, or have a problem. The "no" inverts the meaning. A beef is to fight or complain. So, in context, the phrase means something like: British people who are willing to complain about bad food in a restaurant are usually rude.


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