84

IKEA is just the brand name, or business name, of a global business; it's a name just like "Apple" or "Google" or "John's Grocery Store". A person who founds a business can give it any name they want (so long as no-one else legally controls that name). The founder of IKEA was a Swedish businessman called Ingvar Kamprad. He made up the name by using his ...


74

IKEA furniture is sold as kits. Most buyers save money by assembling the furniture themselves. Most of the instructions are in the form of pictures, with no words.


22

It's just an example of what the manual looks like. i.e. it can be compared to the looks of an IKEA manual. They could probably have written LEGO-like, but went with a brand that is (more)known for their self-assembly manuals, that is without any words but clear illustrations. To illustrate: IKEA: Lego:


20

I don't think there is such a thing as "laziness" in grammar. You can't just omit things in the middle of a sentence because you feel lazy and have a grammatically correct sentence. The reason why floors 2 and 3 is used without an article is because in English we usually don't use definite articles in front of things that have numbers following them. That's ...


11

In American English, it's common to refer to such a place as "the doctor's office" or even just "the doctor". Such places may be officially called something like "Offices of Dr. Jones, MD". The word "clinic" should also be pretty widely understood as different from a hospital. It might have a connotation of being a place that focuses more on one specific ...


10

We were between floors when the elevator broke down. [i.e. not specific and plural] No the. idiom: to be between two things in the plural. However, if you then want to be specific, you would say: We were between floors 2 and 3 when the elevator broke down. BUT: We were between the 2nd and 3rd floors when the elevator broke down. We were between two ...


5

You confusion here is that you're not properly differentiating between what it means to be on "the 4th floor" vs. being on "floor 4". Being on "floor 4" means you are on the floor named/labeled "4". The name of it is "floor 4". Being on "the 4th floor" means you're on the floor that is the 4th one. For floors these things typically coincide, so we use the ...


4

In Britain, a clinic is a place where outpatients go for an ongoing medical condition to be monitored, or to receive regular sessions of treatment. It's usually a specialist department in a hospital. A GP practice usually calls its building a surgery (not very logical, I know). If it is under the same roof with other healthcare services (such as a pharmacy ...


4

You could say any of the following: X happens every other month. X takes place every other month, starting January. From Cambridge: every other something: not each one in a series, but every two. Example: The conference used to be held every year, but now it takes place every other year. We get together every other Saturday for lunch.


4

Nonstandard usage is fairly common in lyrics (or poetry), either to make the words fit a meter or rhyming scheme, or for some specific poetic effect. In this case, here's what I think is going on. The whole song is in the present tense (e.g. "Molly stays at home and does her pretty face"). In the line you identified, the writer wants to indicate that two ...


3

darkness is the state or quality of being dark. dark is either an adjective or a noun. The darkness of the night was overwhelming. We could see absolutely nothing outdoors. It was a dark night so we could see nothing outdoors. The thieves crept away in the darkness. [same as the dark, there] The darkness of the colors in the painting was so ugly. [dark ...


3

Therethen is not an established word, so it doesn't have an established meaning. (It is not in the OED or in English Wiktionary). If somebody uses it, they can use it with any meaning they want. Your guess is as good as anybody else's as to what they did mean.


2

While a poet is free to choose any words, none of yours really fits the context or image. The words you suggest are generally employed in the description of people/animals and their attitudes/approaches/actions. Such a light would usually be described as faint. Other possible adjectives in this context might be indistinct, twinkling, glimmering or ...


2

In AmE (at least in New England, but this could be regional) a clinic typically refers to an outpatient treatment or diagnostic center. Hospitals may contain clinics, but clinics are not hospitals. Doctors may also have private offices that are not associated with hospitals or clinics. Someone seeking treatment, diagnosis, therapy, or advice might say they ...


2

They mean exactly the same thing. If you read sufficient books, you will find the English language being used in every conceivable way, sometimes with great skill and sometimes rather clumsily. Not all writing is grammatical or idiomatic. In this instance the writer has chosen to try to make a point by using lend at the start of the sentence and give at ...


2

No, "go for a ride" can't really be used interchangeably with "go for a walk", because you need something to ride in or on: a car, bike, horse, etc. Idiomatically, you don't go for a ride on your own feet. However, "go for a ride" can and often does share the connotation of having no particular destination in mind and journeying purely for relaxing, ...


2

I would suggest: Here's the change from your hundred (dollar bill/note) NOT the change BACK... How much change do/would I get from $100 (note)? and I doubt I have change for $100.


2

You perform a piece of music or an operation or an autopsy. You perform on stage. A blood test is done. I recommend you have it done [the blood test] tomorrow. Also, when you use perform (not for music, for medicine), it is a formal word. The doctor performed the operation last night. For music, it is also rather formal: We performed [played] in ...


2

The answer, from usingenglish.com: "When paper money is new, it's referred to as being crisp, not all folded and wrinkled."


2

I have never seen went burgled. Using went in such a way is not idiomatic. Here's the ones I can think of: went... hungry, crazy, south, away, missing, "the way of" (the dinosaurs, etc.) A few of those have in common that the action occurs due to neglect of some sort, and your house might be burgled because you are not there, but it sounds very ...


1

In medicine, perform typically refers to what a health provider does to a patient. An actor performs when he is in the front of an audience. If your friend orders an online test and the nurse does the test, it is then the nurse who "performs the test" and your friend "has a test." You usually do not say "perform" when you are doing something for yourself. ...


1

Short answer: No, they are not synonymous. If you think you are partly to blame, then you think or suspect that there is enough blame for everyone involved, perhaps including Peter and Andy, and that others may share the blame with you. Depending on what share you think you or they deserve, you might say: Partly A small amount; less than a majority of ...


1

I don't think there is a word in English that means exactly what you are looking for here. "Nickname" is more general and doesn't necessarily have the sense of fondness. Words like "moniker" and "appellation" are not common in everyday speech. Also, "moniker" is often used to describe criminal nicknames like "Billy the Kid." "Loving" words are known as "...


1

Yes, it's used correctly in your sentences. If you check meanings of dark in the Collins dictionary here, then one of them is defined as follows: The dark is the lack of light in a place. In your sentences, the dark matches this definition completely. You can also replace it with darkness because it's a synonym in this context.


1

There are different kinds of poetry, of course. Any of your three could be used. 'Faltering' is good. It suggests your star, lighthouse or lamp may be about to fail. 'Wavering' means the same but is less interesting. And it's rather a 'poetic' word and is therefore best avoided! The rare 'timorous' appears in such a famous poem by Robert Burns that it's ...


1

You could improve the grammar by changing every "stop" into "stopped", but it seems futile. We really need to address the therethen! You must have been here, at StackExchange. I have no idea what Pacerier is talking about, but this site shows you how to focus your mental energy in a way that the universe can react to it. That's always worth doing. When you'...


1

Your example phrase does make sense, and wouldn't necessarily make me think "what bar is this guy talking about?" - in colloqial British English at least, it is very common to say "I was down the pub the other week" and for it to be understood "the" pub is probably the speaker's local/habitual pub, and/or whatever pub they happened to be in, it doesn't ...


1

Is the person you are talking to likely to ask 'Which bar?'. Generally, we tell people as much as they need to know to understand what we are saying. If your idea could have popped into your head at any bar, then it is not important to say exactly which bar you were at (but you can). If your idea is somehow related to exactly which bar you are in, then it's ...


1

In Australian English, our terms are basically the same as in British English, but most American terms would be recognised and used by many as well. (I've never heard "prompt/urgent care" used here, though. You have "after-hours GPs", or just go to the hospital.) So you can call it a "doctor's surgery", "surgery", or just "the doctor" (or "GP").


1

Though not a native speaker, I'm saying what is in India, largely. Here, clinics are meant for seeing patients and treating them with prescribing medicines. It is OPD. Some clinics would have 1-5 beds but that is to treat minor elements and the stay is pretty short. Generally, clinics would have general practice (say MBBS) or only one specialization (say M....


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