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Cracking is an adjective that means great ("a cracking good book"), but that doesn't make sense here, given the second sentence. More likely it's simply the present participle of crack: [Merriam-Webster] 2 : to break, split, or snap apart // The statue cracked when she dropped it. Figuratively, the passage would mean something like this: Miguel ...


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The smoking means: inhale and exhale the smoke of tobacco or a drug. Smoking indicates you are enjoying the smoke of the tobacco. But there is the chewing tobacco, which was once used a lot by baseball players. For the chewing tobacco, you absorb nicotine by chewing and keeping it in the mouth. You don't smoke the chewing tobacco.


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macOS Big Sur (version 11.0) is the next major release of macOS, Apple Inc.'s operating system for Macintosh computers. It is the successor to macOS Catalina (version 10.15) and was announced at Appleā€™s Worldwide Developers Conference on June 22, 2020, with public beta release scheduled for July and general release projected for fall. It is named after the ...


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'commonplace' means 'not unusual; ordinary' Not referring to an actual 'location' so you should say "meet in a commonplace location" (meet in an ordinary place) 'common place' literally means 'a place that is shared by the public', or in this case, shared by the two parties. Similar to 'common area' (e.g. The living room in this rental house is a ...


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You could rewrite this many ways, but one example would be: Ctesiphon, indeed, was not worth to Persia what it had been worth to Parthia. The construction "is ... to ..." can describe worth, meaning or relationship. For example: "He is a friend to me". or "It is nothing to him". In your example, the specific relation is not ...


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I believe an example will explain better. Look: Let's assume that the following situation happens in a casino. Man: "Please, spin the dice twice". Woman: "Ok, sir. Done". Man: "Oh my God. I lost again! Please, spin the dice twice over". The man only asked the woman to spin twice over after asking some seconds before to draft ...


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You are asking for more examples for the usage of the word "would." The word "would" is also used as the past tense of the word "will." For example: I will say that is true based on what I know. [All the verbs are present tense: will say, is, know.] VERSUS: I would say that is true if I knew for sure what time the other ...


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