20

The technical distinctions the other answers are giving might be true, but for the purpose of an English language learner, I think the most important distinction is that scissors is a very widely used term, and shears is a more specific, more technical term. You're also more likely to hear "shears" with a clarifying adjective, like "pinking shears" or "...


18

Warmth, in photography, image editing, or other graphic arts, describes the amount of red, yellow, and orange shades, as opposed to blues, greens and teals. Look at the labels on this color wheel: This photography site provides good information, and helpful images: " Warm and Cold Light (White Balance)" Have you ever seen the sun set? What colour was ...


13

Scissors and shears are essentially the same type of object - that of two sharp opposing blades with some sort of hinge mechanism. Scissors usually(1) refer to the hand held size implements of this type, with a hole on each handle - one for the thumb one for the finger(s). It's important to note that the holes are not necessarily the same size or shape. ...


9

In non-technical terms, shears are usually for cutting hedges or bushes or plants and require two hands when used and they look like this: And scissors are like this and are used with one hand:


2

You are almost right. except that is used to give a reason why something is not possible or true only is used to show what is the single or main reason why something mentioned in the first part of the sentence cannot be performed or is not completely true Note that that is only required as a part of the except that idiom: it is not required with only. The ...


2

(1) refers to a conference as an organised event - "International Conference on XYZ" (2) refers to Mr Dickson being one of a group of people conferring together; it might be part of a larger event, or just a situation where local officials have come together to discuss some serious issue that has arisen.


2

A pipe key is an old fashioned key, where the barrel is hollow and fits over a pin in the lock. If it's full of dust, it's not going to fit. So, we are to imagine the devil blowing across the top of the key to clean it (like a cowboy in a western blowing smoke from his gun) and making a whistling sound.


2

This is a real word. It's generally spelled spritz, even though it is commonly pronounced shprits. What it means in this context is not raining but raining lightly, or in non-Yiddish-influenced English, drizzling. The word spritz came from Yiddish or German; in German spritzen means to squirt. In Yiddish the corresponding word is shpritsn (שפּריצן). It ...


2

An automobile is any kind of car. The first cars were said to "move of themselves" because they were not horse-drawn, not because they didn't need a driver! (The last syllable is pronounced beel because the word originated in France.) Automobile and auto are, I think, used more in American English than in Britain, where we originally called them motor cars, ...


2

A person can be interested in something or someone. Someone or something can be interesting to someone. Verb participles can be used as adjectives. Interested can be an adjective meaning 'having a feeling of interest'. interested adjective (FEELING INVOLVED) wanting to give your attention to something and discover more about it: He didn't ...


1

The most general meaning of X on Y when talking about physical things is: X is above Y. X and Y are touching. If you move Y, X moves too - X and Y may or may not be attached. The thickness of X and Y isn't important. So, a cup can be on a table, a building can be on the ground, and you draw or write on a piece of paper. Web technology is originally ...


1

Is it true that ... a mobile is always a phone? Not always. This is also a mobile:


1

Here is a picture of some steps and one from a dictionary! (Cambridge) Step (Cambridge Dictionary)


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