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Language and culture are inseparably tied to each other. I would use this sentence, but I agree with Edward Barnard that "connected" could be used instead. Remember that even in the purely physical realm, one can speak of two beams being tied together by bots or by crossbars. When used metaphorically, "tie" does primarily mean "connect". Even where the ...


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The transcription has errors. A more accurate rendering of this segment would be Cities can be difficult places to navigate at the best of times. But for some with disabilities, they can turn into gauntlets. With nearly 200 million people globally experiencing a severe disability, stairs, curbs, train gaps, even crosswalks can be impossible. As ...


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I am not sure I know an adjective that could easily be substituted directly into the sentences you give. However here is how I would phrase such a sentence: Since "usual" is an adjective, while "always" is an adverb you would have to add an additional verb for always to modify: The flower seller was where he always was I will put the keys where they ...


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Target audience is an established phrase. Targeted audience is not usually used, possibly because it is the presentation or product which is targeted, not the audience. The iWeb corpus has 53998 hits for "target audience", against 3511 for "targeted audience".


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The answer to this could depend upon which version of the English language is being used. For instance, there is American English and there is British English. I've often found that while much of our language usage is similar, there are many idioms that differ greatly in how they are used. Sometimes dialects vary--drastically at times--depending upon where a ...


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Pomo is an informal abbreviation here for post-modern or post-modernist. Postmodernism is a highly flexible and widely misused term that refers to various trends in criticism, philosophy, the arts, and other areas of culture rejecting objectivity and universalism in notions of beauty, truth, morality, progress, and so on, in a rejection of modernism. The ...


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It's telling us that the train tracks are "down" from the "here" of the narrator. Perhaps the downhill side of town, perhaps the old train tracks are in a railway cutting. It's giving us a sense of the physical geography and simultaneously giving us an emotional clue. It's not over towards the old train tracks: somewhere away from here, suggesting a ...


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Sentiment - a thought, opinion, or idea based on a feeling about a situation, or a way of thinking about something Feeling - emotions, especially those influenced by other people emotion - a strong feeling such as love or anger, or strong feelings in general I.e. Feeling and Emotion are almost entirely synonymous, emotion just tends to imply a stronger ...


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(This answer describes British usage: American usage may be different). For collectives generally, if what you are saying is true of the collective as a whole, then use the singular: The infantry is made up of many separate units. If what you are saying is true of the individuals in the collective, then British usage prefers a plural: The infantry are ...


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In this context slightly offset means slightly to one side as opposed to directly behind.


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The word "typical" is derived from "type" (of course), and the dictionaries I checked mention "type" somewhere in their definitions of "typical". Your proposed meaning of "ordinary" is fine, but it should be understood as "ordinary considering what category the thing is in (what its type is)." So, when the doctor says a chest X-ray is "typical for a ...


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These words are close to being interchangeable. However, there's another definition of common that you need to be aware of. From Merriam-Webster: 5a: Falling below ordinary standards: second-rate 5b: lacking refinement: coarse. When you say that somebody's behavior was quite common (example 2), native English speakers are likely to assume that this is ...


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All it means is that the armour isn't just one bit, it's the full package. A suit of armour is head to toe. Usually, it's refers to medieval type. Here is an example. I'm not sure why you were having an issue with googling it! Here is a wiki link you may also find useful.


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No is a determiner: it introduces a noun phrase, but it is not a noun phrase on its own. No reason is a noun phrase. None is a pronoun: it can act as a noun phrase on its own. None reason is a noun phrase followed by a separate noun, and is not any kind of constituent of a sentence. The addition of the modifying phrase other than ... doesn't change this.


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Language and culture are inseparably .............. to each other. = tied [as with have a bond or tie" but not as in **tie a knot] = bound [as in bind, bound, bound, meaning going together or connected to each other] = connected = related = joined To have strong ties to a community. To be closely tied to a community. To have close bonds (ties) to the ...


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The phrase "target audience" is significantly more common, but I have seen "targeted audience" used, mostly in a marketing context. This google Ngram confirms that "target audience" occurs 10-20 times as often as "targeted audience" in the corpus used by the ngram viewer. While US usage would favor "is" over "are" in this context, UK usage would not, and ...


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Common generally refers to thinks which are frequent or occur a lot, whereas ordinary refers to things being plain or of no particular note. In your examples: Example one: - Common -language most frequently used - Ordinary - language without using any fancy words or confusing constructions Example two: - Common - Doesn't really work here, unless you'...


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The idea is probably that they were petty criminals, with low rank and status within whatever formal or informal criminal hierarchy existed locally. (That hierarchy would be the "team" that the metaphor implies.) The author might also be implying that their direct involvement in serious criminal activity (beyond illegal gambling and the like) was only ...


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After reviewing the video, and using YouTube's closed captioning feature the word they used is "gauntlets" according to the second set of definitions from Merriam-Webster: 2: a severe trial: ordeal The usage of this word conjures up a sort of dangerous ancient obstacle course that someone must navigate through.


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In the first scenario, authentic would be the most common word to use for a painting that has been proven to truly be by the painter it is supposed to be by. It sounds the most scientific, and matches the name of the process of proving if a painting/document is "true" - "authentication" However, saying "This is a genuine Da Vinci" also does not sound weird, ...


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Both Don't be discouraged and Don't be disappointed are perfectly natural things to say, and in many contexts they'll effectively mean the same thing - speaker is advising someone to look on the bright side (to find good things in a bad situation). As OP has discovered, the dictionary definitions are somewhat different, but they're obviously closely related....


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As something being used in a figurative sense, I would say that none of those words are particularly idiomatic in the particular sentence construction in the question. They might be used in some other figurative constructions: This is the start of your life down an academic path. She didn't take the easy road. That choice was a one-way route to ...


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Ngram doesn't like these because neither is particularly idiomatic. The common expression is Don't lose/give up hope. This remains the same even with specific subjects, or general observations Don't lose hope that your mother will recover from her illness. Don't lose hope in the future. In general, we don't say "your hope", possibly because it'...


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The first and third mean pretty much the same thing, but the latter is stronger than the former: As usual, she was wearing jeans. This means she wore jeans more often than anything else. As always, she was wearing jeans. This is more emphatic, and suggests she never wore anything except jeans. (In reality, we often say things like this even when ...


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There are many kinds of armor. As a general term, it refers to anything worn to protect the body against violent injury. Up until the middle ages, armor came in pieces that protected the most vulnerable parts of the body -- the chest, head and waist, and sometimes the arms and lower legs. As an example, this ancient Greek hoplite armor: This can be ...


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I think the reason you cannot picture a "suit of armor" being used on a modern battlefield is that suits of armor are not used on modern battlefields. Certainly there can be armored items - a tank is an armored vehicle, for instance and there can be armored vests and so on - but suits of armor haven't been used in real battles in centuries.


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"...you should never run out of steam (pursuing such an important goal)." If you run out of steam, you suddenly lose the energy or interest to continue doing what you are doing: David seems to be running out of steam. I decided to paint the bathroom ceiling but ran out of steam halfway through. How To Reach Your Goal When You Are Running Out Of ...


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"get/getting cold feet" is a rather specific saying, and you probably shouldn't try to extrapolate too much from it. A more natural way to write that last sentence would be: "Don't ever let yourself get cold feet." but I don't think it fits the scenario very well: "cold feet" is more related to avoiding doing something specific. The classic use is prior to ...


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This question is more of an opinion, since you are writing a song and, as we know, that does not require immaculate grammar! With a bit of context, the listener will understand your meaning, I believe. You are meaning it to imply the word "amount". I need you both the same [amount] I don't think there is a better way of saying this whilst still ending ...


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Both are grammatically correct, however, if we look at the following definitions there is one which fits better than the other: Appreciate to recognize how good someone or something is and to value him, her, or it Value the importance or worth of something for someone Appreciate your youth/parents. Value would imply that they have worth, whereas ...


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