13

In my experience, silverware is the most common term for metal eating utensils (forks, knives, spoons), though flatware is also perfectly acceptable. I've also heard and used cutlery to describe this set of items, though in the U.S., cutlery can also refer to kitchen knives of all kinds. Crockery is very common to refer to ceramic dish sets, also just ...


6

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/whether-you-say-freakin-friggin-or-frickin-depends-on-where-youre-from In this case, it's used as a softened version of the F-word.


5

Regarding "the dishes": A dish, in my area of the USA is more often called "a plate". It is a flat, usually round thing made from plastic, glass, or ceramic that you put non-liquid food on and eat from. However, the dishes can either mean a collection of plates, (especially as compared to bowls, as in "put the dishes here and the bowls there"), but most ...


3

(a) The film was a real rubbish. NO (a) This car is a rubbish. NO (b) This car is a lemon YES The word rubbish is an uncountable noun, you cannot count "rubbish" individually. The correct way to state the OP's sample sentences would be This car is rubbish That film was rubbish That film was really rubbish Man, this job is rubbish. ...


2

For all of these examples except the fourth, I would choose victory. The reasons why are a little different for each, so I'll do my best to explain them individually. The differences between these words are few and relatively minor, but one to take note of is that a triumph is very explicitly made against something or someone in particular, whereas a victory ...


2

Refer can be a direct reference; it has multiple meanings The verb refer has several meanings (or different shades of meaning). One of these is: refer to [somebody/something] -- phrasal verb B2 to talk or write about someone or something, especially in only a few words: In her autobiography she occasionally refers to her unhappy ...


1

These two pairs of words are indeed quite similar, and can sometimes be used interchangeably, but the connotations differ enough that usually these terms are distinguishable. Generally speaking, to accept something is a positive action, implying that you are at terms with whatever you are accepting and are, more or less, embracing it -- on the other hand, to ...


1

You're right, bathroom scales appear to be of a norm. I perceive from a quick search online it is a category to all if not most commercial stores when shopping for all scales. Even when not precisely located, it may still appropriately be called a bathroom scale. I believe in a culture differing from that of U.S. the combination of both these words, ...


1

Signing the contract was a great victory / triumph for me. Both are figurative in meaning, and the choice depends on how much you want to emphasize your emerging as victor. I'd prefer the former over the latter because in this particular instance, a triumph is already great enough, so a victory is what I think would be the usual choice. In an example (...


1

In this context, "rubbish" is strictly British. Along with "lorry", "flat", and "petrol", it's one of the common words that show up on lists of differences between the two countries, and how to immediately tell someone is likely to be from the UK (aside from the accent, of course). Americans do say "rubbish", but not normally as a metaphor for something of ...


1

It means a "longer and more detailed discussion". In this context a discussion is probably not a spoken conversation, but a piece of academic writing that considers multiple points of view. Programmers in C++ should avoid using namespace std. For a fuller discussion of why this is the case, read the answers to Why is “using namespace std;” considered bad ...


1

"Opposite" cannot go in either slot. Opposite is very specific; it must be a mirror image of X in reverse on the other end of the spectrum. "Contrary" describes something that is just NOT X but can be anywhere along the spectrum. It is far less precise.


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