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These Norse gods were pretty fierce, so here the author is using a simile: a giant of a man, ruddy and gruff, like an angry Norse god. All the adjectives would well describe the intimidating Scandinavian deities: The source texts mention numerous gods, such as the hammer-wielding, humanity-protecting thunder-god Thor, who relentlessly fights his foes; the ...


3

"what good's" is a contraction for "what good is." Contractions are common in speech. The meaning is: "If you have not been able to come to a conclusion after thinking about something for your entire adult life, you are extremely unlikely to reach a conclusion in the next few minutes."


1

(@stangdon's comment should be an answer.) I assume that "it" is referring to a car. There's a punishment for parking in a place you're not allowed to, where instead of towing the car, they lock a device onto a wheel that prevents the car from driving away until a fine is paid. That's called "booting" the car. (It's a less serious result ...


1

A dialect is a particular form of a language. Some become adopted as national or regional standards. The dialect of English spoken in the "home counties" between London, Oxford and Cambridge became the standard dialect of British English. So dialects can be standard dialects, like British English. Or non-standard, like Cockney. What is standard in ...


1

It's referring to the gods on the Scandinavian mythology, or Viking gods, like Thor, Odin and the like. Some of them are typically depicted as muscular, fearless and big men, which given the preceding words on the phrase, makes that clear. See here, for example.


1

Most of them have the a similar meaning to "were you aware of the intonation pattern" with the exception of "find" and "discover" which have would a more "did you actively search for the intonation pattern" sense in that phrase.


1

Although this site does not offer proof-reading of scripts, the following points may be useful. As "gotube" commented, the word vividly is out of place. You mean that it can be clearly seen. We don't talk about less amount. Lesser amounts or smaller amounts would work, so would a smaller amount. You could simply refer to fewer dairy products but ...


1

(for) long is preferred for statements in the negative: I will be busy for a long time - positive I won't be busy for long - negative (for) long is preferred for questions: Have you known him long? - question I have known him for a long time. - statement


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