30

It means a room in house, often a bedroom but not always. It suggests a private room. This is about a Hotel, so there are lots of rooms that are rented out, but there are also the master's private rooms. The "master's chambers" means his private rooms in the hotel. It suggests a party, held in the private part of the hotel, which might include a ...


16

‘Chamber’ in general is a historical term for a room. These days it’s a bit dated, and rarely seen outside of creative writings (such as song lyrics or novels) or fixed phrases (the most common one being a judge’s chambers, which refers to their private office and associated legal library). In the plural sense used in this song, it refers to the collection ...


12

You’ve found a verse that’s very open to interpretation. Literally, “the Master’s chambers” would be a suite of rooms where some “master” lives. It’s rare in America, but some hotels do have “masters,” and a Google Books search does find a few inns and hotels (as well as universities) that had “master’s chambers” in the nineteenth century. So the ...


12

"Drop" in the sense of "stop nagging" is more often paired with "it." I tell my dog "drop it" when I want her to release something she has in her mouth. If someone is pestering you and you said "drop it," the antecedent to "it" would be "the topic." But I think the meaning of "drop&...


6

No, "assigned in" and "assigned to" are not interchangeable. "Assigned to" is idiomatic and "assigned in" is not. As you say, when describing what you were assigned, you use the preposition to: In Nigeria, I was assigned to the water-supply project. And when describing where you were assigned, you also use to: When ...


6

Well, it's a song lyric, so it doesn't really have to make sense. But let's tease out what little we can. There's one definition on that Cambridge page that refers to a judge's private office, if "chambers" is plural. In this sense, the term can more generally be used to mean a professional office where privacy is vital. So I'm confident the place ...


6

"Was it really a Martian?" means 'was the apparition really a Martian (or something else)?' ("in his room" would be a bit superfluous here.) "Was there a Martian in his room?" means 'was a Martian present in the room?" NB If you are directly quoting his thoughts, they would be "Is there a Martian in my room?"


3

So they gathered in the master's bedrooms for the feast? That doesn't make much sense to me, Yes, that's the reaction that most native speakers have, too. You've chosen a great song, but one that may be difficult for testing your understanding of English — it's intentionally written to be nonsensical and dreamlike. Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the ...


3

JewelryShoppingGuide.com suggests that it might be called a cuff bracelet. Note that "cuff" as in handcuffs carries a meaning in English that is similar to shackle but less so, or at least that is how I see the terms: Handcuffs are used on people who have been arrested and are being transported to a police station, or on prisoners who are ...


2

Drop X can mean "remove X from your task list." So if the consultants have a list of people they need to nag daily or some other interval, "drop X" can mean to stop nagging them in that context.


2

Without the "down", it's impossible to tell whether the side in question -- in this case, "you" -- has the 2 points or the 0 points. Saying "2-0 down" makes it clear that they have the 0 points, and is equivalent to saying that they are "losing 2-0". Conversely, you could say "2-0 up" to mean the same as &...


2

It probably means that it will soon be night (understanding as to mean because). See this. However, while looking for a definition as proof of my interpretation I also found this - definition 2. Oddly, Collins only gives the 'approach' meaning under American English, though I'm perfectly familiar with it as a British person. Indeed, it's the basis of a ...


2

Oxford Dictionaries gives the derivation as: mid 17th century (originally used by sawyers as a rhythmical refrain): reduplication of the verb saw (symbolic of the sawing motion). Before mechanisation, logs of wood had to be cut up by two men, each holding one end of a long saw and pulling it to and fro. Apparently "See-saw" was a chant they used as ...


1

Proactive means to be active in advance of something. Merriam-Webster proactive acting in anticipation of future problems, needs, or changes It can be contrasted with active, meaning exhibiting activity of any kind, and reactive, meaning acting in response to something. I think proactive fits your sentence best: get out there and do something, instead of ...


1

"Sharply" implies a change in the rate of increase: prices rose sharply on Tuesday Implies that the rate of increase on Tuesday suddenly changed. Whereas "steadily" means the opposite: with no changes in the rate of increase. Thus the two are opposites. Instead of "sharply and steadily" I propose "rapidly": Prices ...


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