72

The verb itself is almost never used in every day English, but there are two adjectives formed from it which are common: "scathing" means extremely harsh, biting, critical; e.g. "he launched into a scathing attack on his opponent's policies"; "the review was scathing in its criticism" "unscathed" means "unharmed&...


47

You parsed it in error. It's not (not) felt (not) a fury (not) that is not his own pound (not) through his body The noun is not "pound" being modified by "fury". It is "fury" being modified by "pound". felt a fury that is not his own pound through his body "Pound" is what the fury is doing. It's an ...


46

It is purely a conversational joke, a little old-fashioned, a way of saying "Yes", "That is correct", or "You have guessed correctly". In courts of law in English-speaking countries, a defendant (accused person) is asked to "plead" either "guilty" (they admit the crime) or "not guilty" (they deny ...


44

I think you have misparsed this. It seems you treat "worry" as a noun and an object of stroke "to stroke his whiskers" and "to stroke his worry". That's not correct. "Worry" is a verb, and so there is a list of two actions: "to stroke his whiskers" and "to worry". Worry is being used as a quotative verb like "say" or "ask". It introduces the direct speech....


33

The term "pound" in this instance means to pulsate or throb. The sentence could have been written: "He felt ... fury ... throb through his body". or "He felt ... fury ... pulse through his body". We often refer to blood "pounding" in a person's veins when a person is angry or fearful, because of the faster and harder heartbeat that is created by ...


31

If you look at the graphic you attached to the question, you'll see the answer already provided. At a supermarket, where you've already paid, you get a receipt: [Merriam-Webster] 1 a : a writing acknowledging the receiving of goods or money It's only at a restaurant, for example, when you're given a statement of what you ate and how much you still owe,...


30

proverbial = goes beyond its first meaning Merriam Webster: Definition of proverbial 1: of, relating to, or resembling a proverb 2: that has become a proverb or byword : commonly spoken of the proverbial smoking gun aka well-known or familiar, too. No, there is no specific "proverb" associated with the middle finger. However, the middle finger ...


29

I'm not a native english speaker but i feel like the accepted answer may be incorrect (and this figure of speech translate well in french so ..). I would say to "lose her" here means that you'll lose her in the discussion, she'd start rambling/monologuing about her finances without you being able to input anything.


29

Okay, this is not standard English at all - it's a chain of jargon and in-jokes from the field of artificial intelligence (and computer graphics) that dates back a few decades. First of all, the word "bird" in some New York City dialects is pronounced similarly to "boid" - linguists would say that those accents are non-rhotic (that is, ...


29

A quick search reveals the following information. (From Wikipedia) Control, chief of the Circus, suspects one of the five senior intelligence officers at the Circus to be a long-standing Soviet mole and assigns code names with the intention that should his agent Jim Prideaux uncover information about the identity of the mole, Prideaux can relay it back to ...


25

In addition to the two existing good answers, I'd like to add that the fuller version of "guilty" is "guilty as charged". The basic meaning of this phrase is the same as "guilty" as explained by Michael Harvey and jla, namely, to affirm that one is responsible for a crime that they have committed. The state will prove that the ...


24

Contrary to most answers here, I think there are mutiple meanings here. Doubts about Dumbledore had riddled him You could argue (as others have) that the doubts he had about Dumbledore were puzzling to Harry. However, unless Dumbledore actually set him some riddles/puzzles to solve, I think it really means that Harry is: Riddled with doubt This is a ...


24

Provocateur is present in Merriam-Webster's online dictionary with two definitions: 1 : agent provocateur 2 : one who provokes a political provocateur The OED definition, meanwhile, is "A person who provokes a disturbance; an agitator; an agent provocateur". "Agent provocateur", in turn, is defined first as a person employed by ...


23

You should check more dictionaries. I have heard of Longman's dictionary, but it certainly isn't the top choice. For British English, always check Oxford and Cambridge dictionaries. I believe Google uses Oxford as default. For American English, check Websters. Oxford has the following as a primary definition for "innocent": without; lacking. "a street ...


22

A "rise" is an increase in number, size, amount, or degree. A "raise" is an act of increasing something. Rises can happen naturally, or incrementally, such as a rise in temperature or a rise in unemployment. Raises are deliberate increases, such as raising someone's salary or raising an imposed limit. If you look at the dictionary definition for raise as ...


21

"Brothers in arms" is an idiom and a fixed expression. We don't tend to use "in arms" except in this expression. "Brothers in arms" means men who are as close as brothers because they have fought alongside each other in a war. Jack and Arthur were infantrymen in the second world war. They both fought on the Beaches on D-day. After the war they met most ...


21

The technical distinctions the other answers are giving might be true, but for the purpose of an English language learner, I think the most important distinction is that scissors is a very widely used term, and shears is a more specific, more technical term. You're also more likely to hear "shears" with a clarifying adjective, like "pinking shears" or "...


21

You are correct, it means "entirely lacking" but carries a slight sense of humour: if it was logical it would be "guilty of making sense". OED gives innocent of as "Free from; devoid of" with a humourous sense. The earliest recorded use in 1706 is very similar to your quotation: The Opera .. Enrich'd with songs, but innocent of thought (J. Addison ...


21

What was heard was Parseval, although it is often transcribed wrongly. Marc-Antoine Parseval des Chênes (1755 – 1836) was a French mathematician whose work preceded Fourier's (the class topic involves Fourier analysis). Parseval's Theorem is often used to demonstrate mathematics software, including Maple: Maplesoft Reference is made to the scene in ...


21

There is an old children's counting rhyme, used after eating fruit with stones, such as cherries, when the stones are left on the child's plate, or, e.g., when removing petals from a flower. The idea is that they can tell what job or profession they will have when grown up, or in the case of girls, what job their husband will have (I said it was old). For ...


20

The word "open" here is NOT a verb. "To swing something open" is a verb phrase. In your case. it means he swings the plastic strip in a way that it makes the plastic strip open. To swing is the main verb, and open is the state the plastic strip is in after the action of swinging it.


20

That is pure nonsense. "Attendance" is a derivation from the root of the modern English word "attend," which goes back to Old French "atendre," which in turn goes back to Latin "attendere," meaning "to pay attention to." Like modern German and English, Latin made verbs by combining prepositions and root verbs. So "attendere" was formed by combining the ...


20

It doesn't mean "dollar", and it is only remotely related to money. It's an idiom meaning to avoid responsibility. Here, it means that Trump is avoiding responsibility by claiming the governors are at fault. This site details the etymology of the expression: Etymonline "buck" "The phrase pass the buck is recorded in the literal sense ...


19

Warmth, in photography, image editing, or other graphic arts, describes the amount of red, yellow, and orange shades, as opposed to blues, greens and teals. Look at the labels on this color wheel: This photography site provides good information, and helpful images: " Warm and Cold Light (White Balance)" Have you ever seen the sun set? What colour was ...


19

I haven't seen it hyphenated before, but it clearly means "an evening in", i.e. "an evening spent at home".


18

Ink and Toner are two different things. Ink is a liquid substance and is used in some kinds of printers, such as "ink-jet" printers. The ink usually comes in cartridges, and sometimes these cartridges can be refilled with ink. As the ink is liquid, it is projected onto the paper (which is why they are called ink jet printers), and once on the paper it needs ...


18

When you buy a new car, you're supposed to: drive at a variety of different speeds avoid hard acceleration avoid long drives at the same speed (such as on the highway) In American English, this is called the break-in period for the car, or more specifically for the car engine. This term is commonly used for machinery. The break-in period is the time in ...


16

The meaning of "evening-in" here is an evening spent at home. The claim is that one's evening spent at home will be enhanced by playing the game. "Evening-in" won't be in a dictionary, because it's a "nonce word", created in the moment of writing for just that use. The writer used a hyphen to make it clear that he intended the collocation to be regarded as a ...


16

Personally, I think OP's first example is non-standard (particularly for Brits), because we usually use rise rather than raise as the noun form in such contexts (and here's the proof of that, in an NGram chart). Offhand the only really common noun use I can think of for a raise is when it means a wage increase (that's in American English only - British ...


15

Your focus is slightly misdirected. I'm guessing you didn't consider "brothers in arms" because the article is about an actual brother. However, the word is actually part of an idiom. Here's an entry for arms: arm noun 1 Usually arms. weapons, especially firearms. (Dictionary.com) Now, in arms: in arms in British or under arms armed and ...


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