New answers tagged

0

As far as I can remember, Dread, Terror and Horror are described as following: Fear: A generic word for the feeling of something you are afraid of. Dread: "The feeling of impending doom". So in other words, dread is heightened fear and can be real or imagined and example of it would be: "There is something in the dark and it is coming to get ...


3

I would say that you have been involved in the arts. The arts refers to the general set of fields of which artistic/creative expression is a major part (such as writing, theatre, dance, painting, illustration, architecture, fashion, and many others). Art, on the other hand, tends to refer to the creations of the artist, whether that is a painting, a play, a ...


2

Some seem to be "pair" others "poor" “A couldny find a perr o yours that matched This looks like "pair". Pairs are two things that match in some way. I couldn't find a pair of yours that matched. "...the perr old girl" This looks like "poor". "Poor old (something)" is a common combination of ...


2

You have already looked up the verb "to expense" and found the definition "to write off as an expense." "Headphones that I got expensed" uses the past participle of the verb "to expense" in the passive voice. It can be translated as "Headphones that I got written off as a business expense." There is a double ...


4

The primary definitions of 'expense' are as a noun, but Cambridge also lists it as a verb: to show the full amount of money paid for something as a cost in a company's accounts, rather than showing it as a lower and lower amount over a period of time. When you work as an employee for a company and have to pay for something out of your own pocket, you may ...


1

"Abated" does mean "lessened", or "to become less strong". So, in your context it would not mean that the waters had disappeared completely, just that they had lessened. You could therefore use the word "receded" or "subsided" in its place. I recognise the text as being from Genesis 8:8 - as any English ...


1

Riggin' (rigging) seems to be a verb formed from a noun (rig) which is US slang for an articulated truck, and someone who has been 'big rigging' before they could even shave is someone who has been driving such vehicles since an early age. Rig noun [C] (TRUCK) mainly US a truck consisting of two or more parts that bend where they are joined so that the ...


2

A "trucking rig is a truck consisting of a tractor and trailer together. In the business of trucking, this is often abbreviated to just a "rig". A "big rig" is a particularly large truck and trailer. "Big riggin'" is the occupation of driving these large trucking rigs. As you noted, this is American English terminology - in ...


1

It is referring to the assumed 'clandestine event' mentioned in the previous sentence. Isabel is worried that her response: "I'm afraid I find that very difficult to believe." will lead Rock to assume that there were interactions between Isabel and Lord Nicholas. Then she hints to the reader that those assumptions about their interactions would ...


-1

According to the Cambridge Dictionary, the verb substitute has different meanings depending on whether it is transitive or intransitive. This is clearly stated in the American English entry, and is covered by the separate substitute for entry for British English. All of the following sentences are correct and describe the same situation: The manager ...


0

My Great, Great Grandfather, "Esau Pease" was a fishmonger in Billericay, Essex in the 1800's. His nickname was "easy peasey".


1

"Emo" is a term that comes originally from music. The wiktionary entry for emo, noun (from "emocore," "emotion"+"hardcore") lists a progression of meanings, beginning with "a particular style of hardcore rock" and ending at "a young person who is considered to be over-emotional or stereotypically emo.&...


1

Using the phrase assistant [profession] to mean "assistant to the professional" may have been valid at one point, I'm not sure. In modern English that is not how the phrase is used; instead it means someone who performs some but not all duties of the profession, possibly delegated by the master professional. Due to the vagaries of academia, "...


1

The usual way to describe the result of trial is "guilty" or "not guilty". These are the terms that juries use to give verdicts. The jury is asked "How do you find the defendant" and the fore-person replies either "guilty" or "not guilty". Never "Innocent". A person is legally innocent until they ...


2

In this case, this would be something like meaning 3 of Tap in Oxford Learner's Dictionary to make use of a source of energy, knowledge, etc. that already exists though also related to meanings 4, 5, and 6 to fit a device to a phone so that somebody’s calls can be listened to secretly to cut into a tree in order to get liquid from it to choose somebody ...


1

"Wrought" is unusual, but correct. As other answers have pointed out, it's the past tense of "wreak" and in that sense has a very similar meaning to "worked". However, "wreak" and "work" are not quite synonyms. Work has a process-focused meaning: if you are working, you are expending effort on some task. ...


16

Cambridge has this: Tap verb to get or make use of something: There is a rich vein of literary talent here just waiting to be tapped by publishers. Lexico: Exploit or draw a supply from (a resource). The sentence you've quoted: "The dystopian Netflix hit taps South Korea’s worries about costly housing and scarce jobs, concerns familiar to its U.S. ...


10

Tap can be verb. For example, rubber trees are tapped for latex. The sentence means the Netflix hit 'draws on' South Korea's worries. To draw on something means to use it or (as here, I think) exploit it.


0

The word cite is being used to mean "make a record of," rather than just mention. Presumably the school keeps a record of when students misbehave, so the teacher is threatening to log the students on there as punishment. I'm slightly inferring this meaning because it makes the most sense in the definition of write-up. The teacher must be referring ...


1

A test (in the sense of an automated test of a piece of software) is said to be "flaky" if it doesn't always give the same result. For example if it passes sometimes and not others with the same input. A "flake" means that a test failed due to the test being flaky and if the test was re-run the test may pass. A flaky test is a bug that ...


0

I'd have assumed it meant "fluke" except that the next sentence says "It would be good to file flakes as an issue," and also, software is unlikely have testing issues as hardware might. I suspect it's a technical term for that board. Certainly it does not fit any commonly used definition.


4

A "choice" is usually a selection from a number of possibilities. For example, you might choose what to eat from a menu. "Decision" is a much broader term. Some decisions could have potentially limitless possibilities, such as deciding what career path to take, or deciding what to name a child. However, a 'choice' is a kind of decision, ...


5

Reproof (noun) means 'an expression of blame or disapproval'. The verb is 'reprove' (to deliver such an expression to someone). To 'reproof' or 're-proof' a waterproof item (e.g. a tent, coat, etc) is to re-apply a waterproof coating or treatment that was previously present but which has become old or worn and no longer keeps out the rain. You can buy a can ...


5

This is a slang term formed by reduplication. Similar examples include chit-chat, clip-clop, ding-dong, flimflam, mishmash, ping-pong, and zig-zag Cambridge suggests this definition: lacking in firm ideas, principles, or the ability to make a decision: Clearly, wishy-washy is derived from the meaning of washy that you quote in your question. If you lack ...


2

In this case I would say it is the "considerable" meaning that is intended. That for a frog to have a 1.5% chance each night of being caught by a predator that it is a significant risk for those frogs (of course, nothing like the 19% chance for frogs in smaller populations). The proper comparison to keep in mind is 0% if there weren't predators. ...


2

That sentence doesn't mean that 1.5 percent was a "surprisingly small amount" to the authors. It means that while 19 percent is astonishing, even 1.5 percent is higher than they expected. So, "considerable" is the right answer here, in that it's closest to the meaning of the statement. The authors are saying that number is large.


1

"Deep into" something means far down in something, particularly a body of water or liquid "The chef plunged the meat deep into the fat The pearl divers go deep into the Agean. But this phrase is nowe often used as a metaphor, ratehr than literally. He is deep into Ruskin means that he has been studying Ruskin and is seriously interested in ...


1

To stumble means to "momentarily lose one's balance; almost fall" so this implies that you do not fall to the ground. (definition from Oxford dictionary, via google) So in your case I'd use "trip" which means "catch you foot and stumble or fall". So it includes the possibility that you fall. With your sentence, the part &...


4

"My grade-A loins" here refers to her upper legs, which she is claiming are very attractive. The sentence as a whole means "I am going to stop looking for dates/partners". Or more literally "I am going to stop offering my good-looking body to attract dates." There is a bit of word play here. "meat market" means a ...


0

Not interchangable. The words have different grammar, and different levels of formality. Flush is a less formal and less common word than abundant. You could paraphrase the phrase as There are abundant difficult words in the exam's passage. but not "... is abundant with difficult words..." There are also lots of other meanings to "flush&...


1

It is common to use two or more words that have essentially identical meaning in a title, it feels more comprehensive. So this kind of use should not be taken as evidence for significant difference in meaning. Quirk The relevant sense (b) of "quirk" from Merriam-Webster is: : a peculiar trait : idiosyncrasy Other senses are: a : an abrupt twist ...


5

"Bastardization" means a corruption, a poor and distorted copy. The use of the term always indicates a quite negative judgement of the copy or adaptation. The term is often used for some sort of transformation or derived work, such as a movie from a book, or a modern version from a classic work. The derived work is said to be a bastardization of ...


5

Yes, that would be the same. Bastard originally meant a child from outside of marriage. They wouldn't receive the inheritance of their parents. Bastardized, means something that isn't a good representation of the original. It fails to inherit from the original and perhaps came from a tainted source.


3

The second definition ("produce as a result") fits the meaning here. The word "cause" would also work here, and have the same meaning: What was it had happened to cause this revolution in him?


2

It's remainder, not reminder, and all three words need the in front. The rest of the night is probably the most idiomatic. Although there is a famous novel called The Remains of the Day, I would say that remains is the least idiomatic in this sense, as it usually refers to something physical, such as leftovers from a meal or a dead body ('mortal remains').


1

stone, noun (botany) The central part of some fruits, particularly drupes; consisting of the seed and a hard endocarp layer.


1

"odds", in this case, refers to probability. "heavy odds" would indicate that there is a very large or very small probability. "stacked against" clarifies that only a very small probability exists for success. "odds" is originally a betting term. A horse may be racing with "25 to 1 odds", meaning that a $2 ...


2

Normally we say "as smooth as" rather than "smooth like". I don't understand what you are trying to add with "in daily life". I would go for this: melting as smoothly as butter.


2

Your text says the nickname 'sky walker' was originally earned by an individual through his work of climbing high structures for photographs. It seems that 'sky walker' is meant to mean 'one who walks in the sky'. By extension, this has then become a term for people who imitate the same art. In Native American culture, the term 'walker' is used to mean that ...


1

"That's not the half of it." Usage refers to not knowing the facts or the story. That's literally the "it" in this phrase. It's a way of stating that the shared facts are scant, as compared with the complete set of known facts. Another way of expressing that one knows a small percentage of "the story."


2

I'm not sure the usage you're talking about is "figurative." Yes, if you want to be literally literal about the meaning of the word "literal," then a literal meaning should be closely tied to a word's etymology. But exotic's relationship to exit is that they both come from exo meaning "outside." That could be outside one's ...


1

"Deal with" is neutral or occasionally negative. You can "deal with" a problem by addressing it, which may require some distasteful work on your part or it may not, for example: I'm going to deal with the dishes after dinner — neutral. There is an issue (dirty dishes) and you will take care of that issue, but it isn't a big deal. Fat ...


3

"Blow up" means to explode. It is used metaphorically here, i.e. to suddenly and violently destroy. "Curated" means to carefully craft or select something or things for presentation. It is used here to mean that she has built up her image carefully over time and took care to maintain it. According to this source, Ivanka spent time ...


1

I'm not aware of a specific/sexual application of "a game girl" but I would not use it as it just doesn't sound right – if I saw/heard it I wouldn't really know how to parse it. I can't justify it in terms of grammatical rules, as it should be possible to have an adjective before a noun(!), but I can't find any examples of this usage in the various ...


7

It's as JavaLatte says, though I've also heard it used when things were far better than expected. In 1 Kings 10:7 [KJV], when the queen of Sheba sees the house Solomon has built, she tells the king the reports she had heard were true. Howbeit I believed not the words, until I came, and mine eyes had seen it: and, behold, the half was not told me: thy wisdom ...


15

This is based on the expression not know the half of it. The Cambridge Dictionary defines this as: If someone does not know the half of it, they know that a situation is bad but do not know how serious it is


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