Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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It may differ between organisations, but a "directorate" is normally everything that is under one particular director of the company. "Departments" are usually then smaller areas within the directorate, normally under a department head or department manager. Organisations differ in structure, and I would say that this applies when an organisation has more ...


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Let's first look at the definitions. From Cambridge: Economically: in a way that relates to a country's trade, industry, and money Economically the country has been improving steadily these past ten years. economically depressed/backward/disadvantaged The neighborhood is one of Lexington's most economically depressed areas. economically ...


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Far and far away technically have pretty much exactly the same meaning; however, because far away has two words instead of one, it generally has a bit stronger feeling to it (this is true in general: The more words you add to a term or phrase, the stronger the impression), and thus is usually used to describe longer distances. Far away can also sometimes ...


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It is good for common language, and for everyday, I think, too. Some examples of using "very" same way: “The very same.” ‘The very same,’ I said. Men do the very same thing. And at that very same moment! The very same night?” “The very same, sir.” Everything is the same, the very same as it was, once upon a time. I knew that very same feeling. He had ...


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Although some dictionaries state that the phrases "grit your teeth" and "grind your teeth" both mean to be angry or suffer pain, my understanding is there is a difference. The first is a matter of resolve and the second a matter of experience. The Free Dictionary by Farlex has grit your teeth COMMON If you grit your teeth, you continue to do ...


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I'd say there is no major difference between them. Not just grind and grit your teeth, there are a few more words used for the same; say - gnash your teeth, or even clench your teeth. They all express anger. Note that when you aren't angry, it could be a medical condition named Bruxism.


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This started as a reference to the Watergate scandal, so named because it happened in the Watergate Hotel. And as with all references there are no real formal rules in place that tell you when it is aplicable and when it is not. So going by just the dictionary definition it is used reasonably often to describe any abuse of power. But note that this is very ...


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There’s a pretty good description of what this is back in the first book in Chapter Twelve: and stacks of wizard crackers every few feet along the table. These fantastic party favors were nothing like the feeble Muggle ones the Dursleys usually bought, with their little plastic toys and their flimsy paper hats inside. Harry pulled a wizard cracker with ...


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From Cambridge, A cracker is a paper tube with small toys, small pieces of sweet food, etc. inside, that is covered with bright paper and makes a short, sharp sound when both ends are pulled. "During the Christmas feast at Hogwarts in 1991, Albus Dumbledore received a flowered bonnet from a Wizard Cracker." "A Wizard Cracker is a magical kind of ...


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There is overlap in the meanings and it depends, to some extent, on whether you are using AmE or BrE. In the UK a class or form tends to mean the same thing. A group of young people who study in the same classroom during one school year. In most schools there would be several such forms who, together make up a year. Most UK schools so not use grade in this ...


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Neither. It's talking about cost in the sense of money or effort.


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In fact, we did gather together at high noon later. Well, I think the appropriate meaning of "hit" here is "to go some place together to do something or to meet somewhere with others". Its usage is informal. From Cambridge to arrive at a place or position If we turn left at the next junction, we should hit the main road after five miles or so. ...


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Yes, I believe both have similar meaning, but "move aside" is a little more formal and thus distant, and more often used when you are blocking the way and must make a significant movement. Like I can imagine a a police officer moving toward me say "move aside sir" or "step aside sir," than saying "move over sir." https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/move+...


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I think your comments make it clear that the person has something called a "first-level volunteer license", and the person has also spent 100 hours as a volunteer, i.e. he has volunteered 100 hours of his time. I haven't myself heard of a "first-level volunteer license", and I'm not sure whether it is defined by the 100 hours of volunteer time, or if those ...


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Lemonade is being used as a non-count or mass noun, because the enquiry was about the nature or composition of the drink. What is the black stuff in that pile on the ground? It is coal. What is that white powder on your hands (e.g. to a baker)? It is flour. What are honey gushers? It [a honey gusher] is lemonade. Mass noun


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The answer lies in this ... And other members are much warier of Franco-German dominance, without UK to temper FRA’s & GER’s influence. What this is saying is that with out UK's presence, other members of the EU are worried about France and German's strong dominance. If you are wary of something or someone, you are cautious because you do not know ...


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The top result on Google is probably the best definition for this usage: lacking brightness or interest; drearily dull. In my experience this is by far the most common meaning of "drab". I've never heard of it used in any relation to prostitutes, so I find it strange that Merriam Webster lists that as the top 2 definitions.


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I would agree that “snaps out of it” is too sudden, because “it” has yet to be defined. It makes sense in a very casual sense, but to me doesn’t feel quite right in this (what I assume to be creative writing) context. Perhaps you could solve both problems (the other problem being the lack of detail in “staring blankly”) in a somewhat cataphoric way by ...


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"Staring blankly" means staring with a 'blank expression' on one's face. It could mean that they were not concentrating on the television, but it could also mean that they are so engrossed in what is on the television they have lost all expression. A similar expression that specifically means looking at nothing is "staring into space", or the less common "...


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This is a reference to the movie Groundhog Day, where Bill Murray gets stuck repeating the same day over and over again. Johnson's implication is that the UK is repeating the same actions on Brexit without ever achieving anything.


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Credit is given when you use (with lawful permission) someone else’s work and ideas to develop your own. Ideas and contributions can also be ‘acknowledged’ where there is insufficient material or copyright issues to warrant being ‘credited’ If the material is a straight lift, (rather than your interpretation of their work), the protocol is to ‘Reference’ ...


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refers to holding the line and standard of a cause (winning a game) not giving up even in the face of certain loss. Play for principle -because principle is the best and only reason to be in the game/in the fight.


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I don't think you'll find a single word. "Witty" could work for "smart" and "funny". But don't think you could combine "awesome" in there.


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The first quote is saying that each person has inherent value. You do not need to accomplish something incredible or prove that you are more clever than another person before you will be a worthwhile human being. The second quote means to work to the best of your abilities. It is saying that the best of your abilities may not be the perfect way to do ...


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Yes, recipient can be used for objects, for example, in chemistry. Khan Academy (about chemical bonds): In general, the loss of an electron by one atom and gain of an electron by another atom must happen at the same time: in order for a sodium atom to lose an electron, it needs to have a suitable recipient like a chlorine atom. Wikipedia (about ...


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A recipient, as your definition states, is normally a person or an organisation. You may be after the similar word receptacle. A container, device, etc., that receives or holds something (Dictionary.com) As in: Please take a receptacle to the water fountain. A "water recipient" to me would be a person who is given water. But it sounds quite formal, ...


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To be defeated, there must be an adversary. Whereas something can succeed or fail on its merits (or lack of them). If I try to shoot a basketball through the hoop but miss, alone on the court, that is failure. If I miss because my brother blocked me, that is defeat. He has defeated my attempt. If you don't have a designated adversary but still want to use (...


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I'm here because I'm reading a mystery from 1955 by Patricia Wentworth, The Gazebo, where a character finds a door 'only closed, not shut'. The door is considered not properly shut because the catch hasn't engaged. I have always considered shut and closed interchangeable and do not recollect anyone using it in the manner Wentworth does. I can only assume ...


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The answer by @David Siegel covers it well: although the 2 words are very similar, they can rarely be replaceable. Here, is a real-world example which exemplifies this point: It has been the case from the start that Trump communicates like no president before him. That’s principally because he miscommunicates like no president before him. And while his ...


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My understanding of this phrase is "considering the very core or true meaning of something, it is fitting to do what is mentioned immediately afterwards."


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It depends on what "it" is, For example, if "it" is "the date of the next meeting", then "fix it" must mean "don't change it anymore", since the repair meaning doesn't make sense. On the other hand, if "it" is "a bicycle", then "fix it" must mean "repair it", because nobody wants their bicycle affixed to something. There is rarely any confusion, unless ...


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I'm a native English speaker. I cannot bring to mind any example of "fix" having your second meaning. I understand it to mean: I want to modify/change/repair it I work as a Software Developer and if I'm fixing something I want to do a complete job; I don't want to create new problems as I fix the existing ones. Hence I don't want to keep fixing it ...


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With regards to your example, the word "prominent"/"prominence" comes to mind (though it doesn't actually mean too visible, so we'd have to add that in). It's also quite a sophisticated/erudite statement, and so I'd probably phrase it something like: Unlike philosophers, who suffer a degree of invisibility in society, sociologists enjoy perhaps a little ...


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We had a chat (while) drinking a cup of coffee. This describes two activities taking place at the same time. We had a chat over a cup of coffee. This expresses the coffee as the context in which the chat took place. You might think of the coffee as the foundation ("underneath") of the chat, hence, the chat is described as being "over" the coffee.


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A pay-day loan is a loan until pay day. The idea being that you receive the money now to tide you over until your next pay cheque. Google definitions defines this as: a relatively small amount of money lent at a high rate of interest on the agreement that it will be repaid when the borrower receives their next wages.


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In the context of this exam question, I would say that the key is almost. Almost certainly is a common expression, where as almost positively is not. From nGram Almost certainly roughly means very likely. Here's an example I dug up from Lexico: certainly adverb [sentence adverb] 1 Used to emphasize the speaker's belief that what is said is true. ‘...


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This is a good example of how context is key. Yes, the phrase the hotel lot could be used to refer to what you call "generic unconstructed terrain." After all, a lot is: lot (noun) a portion of land; a measured parcel of land having fixed boundaries and designated on a plot or survey : built his home on a half-acre lot. If you and I were in the ...


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'Say' used like that means 'for example' or 'approximately'. You could imagine it as a shortened form of "let us say" or "let's say". Your rearrangement works fine and does not change the meaning. Definition of say (Entry 3 of 3) 1: ABOUT, APPROXIMATELY the property is worth, say, four million dollars 2: for example : AS if we compress any ...


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if you fail is probably the form you want. failed implies past tense, that it has already happened, but can also be correct. Correct examples of fail: If you fail to explain to me where those coffee cups went, I will fire you. But also one for failed: If you failed to explain to Jeff yesterday where those coffee cups went, he will fire you.


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The term formalism means A description of something in formal mathematical or logical terms. Any attempt to disprove the theory of evolution using thermodynamics will require proper formalisms. However, the term formulation means A particular expression of an idea, thought, or theory. compare this complex formulation with Bosch's much more ...


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Fundamentally, “formalism” and “formulation” are different words, with different meanings, despite being similar looking, and probably having the same root in the far past. “formalism” comes from 'Formal' whereas “formulation” comes from 'Formula', if that helps.


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