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0

"Scaffold" seems like a single discrete structure, a thing. "Scaffolding" is more like a mass noun, so it brings to mind stuff. I might rent a scaffold to paint my house, but Notre Dame is currently covered in scaffolding.


0

To encroach is to intrude on the territory of another person/group, which makes 'encroaching on their turf' almost a canonical usage of the word.


-2

The second one is better, but not the best. A good way to put it is "He is willing to accept directions and instructions whenever needed". Accept is better than take. And whenever, is better than when.


-1

Direction and instruction are synonyms in this context, so the second seems redundant. Construction doesn’t work here at all, but constructive criticism would. What is it you’re trying to say about the student?


3

As the other answers explain, it is not usually used. However it is likely to be understood if used in humor, especially if "unscathed" is spoken by someone first. What's funny about the scene below is that "scathed" is an unusual word, but understood to be the opposite of "unscathed" which is much more commonly used. Sometimes ...


-1

A frightening tirade in Russian would be preferable. Is it clear that it's frightening for the people he shouts at Yes. Would using "terrifying" be a better choice? "Terrifying" is stronger than "frightening". Do you intend to say "extremely frightening"? "Terrifying tirade" is alliteration. In a ...


4

It's a rarer but well-attested form of the idiom "to pass the buck", which means "to refuse to take responsibility". Prior answers went into detail about the etymology, so I'll ignore that and focus on the many uses of "the buck". In general, "the buck" means responsibility, particularly an unpleasant responsibility ...


0

The answers with the meaning are great, but to give specific answers: "never" and "no". Despite being in the dictionary, scathe is dead. It's not even in old movies or historical legal documents. It's so dead that it's considered a made-up word playing off of scathing or unscathed. Using it as a serious synonym for injure would be ...


1

The way you put it, "it broke me", is fine. I looked for the phrase at Google books, and all but one of the hits on the first page had the sense you are looking for (that it caused me severe emotional damage): Google books "it broke me"


10

In music, we sometimes refer to players as “coming in” when they join others already playing. For instance, a piece may start with just violins and then the trumpets “come in”. The conductor motioning for the trumpets to start could be said to “bring in” the trumpets. A piano is played with two hands, so one hand could be said to “come in” or the player ...


12

The translation might be wrong. The corresponding German phrase is holte die Rechte wieder ein which I would translate as 'caught up with the right (hand) again'. 'holte ... ein' is from the verb einholen, which can indeed mean 'to bring in something' but in this case it's definitely the other meaning. to catch up to to reel (source: Wiktionary)


20

It doesn't mean "dollar", and it is only remotely related to money. It's an idiom meaning to avoid responsibility. Here, it means that Trump is avoiding responsibility by claiming the governors are at fault. This site details the etymology of the expression: Etymonline "buck" "The phrase pass the buck is recorded in the literal sense ...


71

The verb itself is almost never used in every day English, but there are two adjectives formed from it which are common: "scathing" means extremely harsh, biting, critical; e.g. "he launched into a scathing attack on his opponent's policies"; "the review was scathing in its criticism" "unscathed" means "unharmed&...


10

It has limited used, it isn't used as a general verb, it is mostly seen in participle form, and often in negative sentences. So don't say "Ronaldo was scathed in the second half" or "I scathed my ankle playing tennis". You can say: The match turned nasty in the second half, with two red cards, but Ronaldo was unscathed. I slipped and ...


1

Why would you bend in the water, if you are not picking something up? Observe the bending posture made necessary by a heavy load.


3

Google Books has scans of The Collected Fantasies of Clark Ashton Smith: A Vintage From Atlantis and Pirate Ghosts of the American Coast: Stories of Hauntings at Sea, which have the word as “cliffs”. A Vintage from Atlantis, on the other hand, has the word “cuffs” here. It looks to me like it’s just a typo that appeared in some version(s) of the story. “...


1

Now we have the context that this is for a 404 page I can see that your original suggestion Oh, no! Stumbled on the void? would work although I might have replaced on with into. Since we know by this point that they have reached a non-existent page I might have used Oh, no! You seem to have stumbled into the void.


2

In this context, both mean the same thing (without companions) - but... He alone survived the accident (he was the only survivor). You can't use by himself here. (To child) Did you draw that picture by yourself? (without being helped). You can't use alone here.


0

If your statements are in rapid succession to each other, more like a dialogue exchange, the pure would mean free of immoral behavior or qualities; clean. I might as well be wrong. It more or less depends on the context of the situation, but also on the mindset of the person speaking to you. It could mean a pun. For more detailed view


1

"Pure" is synonymous with "innocent", and in this context refers to the fact the person is made happy by something as simple and wholesome as a school concert. The word "pure" can also mean "untainted" or "unspoiled", and it is sometimes said of people who are not so easily pleased by simple pleasures that ...


0

Yes, "upstairs" is often used to describe a floor above the one you have previously mentioned, even in buildings with many floors. I can't find fault with your example, yet it doesn't feel quite right because you state right at the beginning that the people are on the third floor. As you must have already stated that the gunfire is occurring on the ...


0

For some of these words, it helps if you think about what the words actually mean. A margin is the edge of something- for example, the margins on a printed document are the whitespace around the actual text. So something that is marginal means a) that it's quite a small amount compared to the whole, and/or b) that it's outside the main area of interest. The ...


3

"He had a satisfiable urge for ice cream.", indicating that he wanted ice cream and would be able to get some. "The ice cream he had was satisfactory.", indicating that the ice cream he ate pleased him in the way that he expected. The words, except for them both having "satisfaction" as a root, aren't very close in meaning.


0

An expression is the process of transmitting ideas, such as thoughts, concepts, or feelings, between entities (such as individuals or groups). An opinion is a judgement or view; thus it is not a fact or truth. An "Expression of Opinion" is used in your example to distinguish between an "Expression of Fact", which would not necessarily ...


0

An "entry" in a dictionary is a headword (the word that gets looked up), plus its definition and any ancillary information that pertains to that word, such as an etymology, any usage notes, example sentences, pronunciation guides, inflected forms of the word and any illustrations. It is everything that is presented as belonging to that headword.


1

An entry in a dictionary is a word that the dictionary gives a definition for. You could say "How many words are in this dictionary?", but that would be ambiguous. If a dictionary says, for example, "hat: (n) A covering for the head", that's clearly one "entry". But is it one "word", that is, one word that is defined? ...


4

Those definitions are correct, bi-monthly (or indeed bi-weekly, bi-yearly etc.) is ambiguous. The fact that it is still commonly used is basically inexplicable. Sorry!


1

I didn't manage to find the original 1930 issue of "Amazing Detective Tales", but the 1941 reprint of the story in "Tales of Wonder" prints the sentence as: A silver dollar and a handkerchief... As such, the word "find" is probably a transcription error.


-2

Okey dokey is kinda Old School... Why not try, "Aye Aye Captain!" instead? It has the same thought that you agreed, while showing the other side of your Humor. or you can also used; "Sounds like a plan." to confidently express that you're down whatever they would like to do. It's way more professional and sounds cooler than; (Yes, Master! ...


1

You are almost exactly right about the meaning of complacent - which is used in a broad range of contexts with very similar effect. Typically the meaning is that the "complacent" person has assumed something - usually, something to their comfort or advantage - without examining the details of the situation. For example: The factory owner had been ...


0

There is no special meaning. It is acceptance, that is complacent It seems to be a "nonce" expression. It has been used only once, in the title of a The Complacent Acceptance of Diversity: Human Resource Development in a Culturally Diverse Environment about the inability of work organizations to achieve racial balance.


10

This is called "reduplication" and rhyming reduplication is quite common casual English "super-duper, easy-peasy" The word "dokey" is just a modified version of "okay" with an arbitary "d" attached to it. The existence of "hokey-pokey" probably influenced the reduplication of okay to okey-dokey In ...


0

To Revolve is to rotate around something else. Ergo, something which rotates will revolve about its central axis. It is revolving, but it is revolving about the central axis. That same object can rotate about its central axis and it means the same thing. All things can rotate, but something else must be present if it wishes to revolve. Therefore, 2. The moon ...


1

Neither answer is correct. The Moon does not rotate around the Earth. It revolves around the Earth. This information is provided in your Given clause. The Given states that the Moon revolves around the Earth and rotates [on its axis] very slowly. It then asks how the Moon rotates around the Earth. It doesn't rotate around the Earth. It rotates around ...


0

I would very much concur that "someone" would definitely be applicably in almost all situations in reference to a pet, even if that pet is diverse (antelope/lion/etc). However this usually only applies to people who have had pets themselves, to someone who has never enjoyed an animal's company, nor seen it's desire to understand and better yet ...


0

The words you have listed, all mean transparent. Words you could use are: dense, thick, heavy, opaque, solid, impenetrable, cloudy, murky, turbid, or nubilous.


0

The word for things like a wall, and not like a window is "opaque". If something is opaque, you can't see through it. In this case I would write: John was hidden in a cloud of smoke. It is easier to say this than to say "The cloud of smoke was opaque"


2

That may have been a speech error. The woman may have meant to say, "Look at all the birds over there. It almost looks like they're watching."


0

"Almost" is used in this sentence as a way to express "they could watch, but are not (yet) watching", trying to express that the birds would watch, if the event was more exciting. More examples: "I am almost asleep." "You are almost there." "The speaker was boring, I was almost listening."


3

Smoking produces smoke, or possibly a cloud of smoke. We don't call it fog. To describe smoke that you can't see through, you could call it: thick 6. adjective Thick smoke, fog, or cloud is difficult to see through. The smoke was bluish-black and thick. (Collins Dictionary) heavy adjective 2 Of great density; thick or substantial. ‘heavy gray clouds’ ‘The ...


0

In one sense, anything humans do skillfully is art (or artful). However, art (or “the arts”) is often contrasted with science, with the general division based on whether correctness is subjective or objective. In this sense, math is definitely not an art (or artistic).


1

To take things literally is to understand words as only what was actually written/said rather than what the author/speaker intended it to mean. In the case of laws or policies, we sometimes contrast “the letter of the law” (literal) and “the spirit of the law” (intent), which are often quite different and can be exploited by creative people.


0

The speaker wants to indicate that they are conscious that "giving the middle finger to the society" is a somewhat cliched figure of speech. Adding "proverbial" to "middle finger" is just an arch way to acknowledge that it's a somewhat shopworn expression. "Proverbial" here means something closer to "hackneyed&...


-2

Well maybe it's just me, but I got the feeling the OP has some religious concerns involved in the question. if and only if that's the case I would like you to consider the fact that some people just don't have religious attachments or restrictions attached to their minds. So some words that may be used with great care and respect by some, simply don't have ...


0

A search for "mathematics art or science" finds this interesting article: The intrepid mathematician My view is that mathematics is neither an art nor a science. A third path exists, nestled between the two, and intertwined with both. Mathematics is inherently different from other disciplines. While it is wildly creative, it is not art. While it ...


0

Mathematicians may wish to think of themselves as artists, bit in general we do not refer to it as an “art”. Math has proofs, eventually math can be proven to be correct or incorrect. As much as I think modern art is incorrect, and the Dutch Masters were correct, that is a matter of taste.


1

A friend of mine = My friend You are, I suspect, misunderstanding the distinction between "a/an" and "the." The indefinite article implies that a single unspecified member of a set is being referenced; the definite article plus a singular noun implies that a singular but previously specified member of the set is being referenced. Neither ...


1

It is to be dramatic One way to say it would be: After careful analysis and consideration of all the various factors involved we have agreed to come to the general conclusion that we do not think there is reasonable merit to the idea. eh It reads better (to some) and has more effect (again to some) as We gave it the proverbial middle finger !!! because of ...


1

To motivate means: make someone want to do something. I will give an example: I am hungry. I am motivated to eat. My hunger motivates me to eat. The grocery store is far away. I do not want to walk to the store, so I am motivated to ride my bike. The far distance motivates me to ride my bike. Another example, for your specific sentence: I want to get a ...


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