New answers tagged

1

These two pairs of words are indeed quite similar, and can sometimes be used interchangeably, but the connotations differ enough that usually these terms are distinguishable. Generally speaking, to accept something is a positive action, implying that you are at terms with whatever you are accepting and are, more or less, embracing it -- on the other hand, to ...


2

You're right, bathroom scales appear to be of a norm. I perceive from a quick search online it is a category to all if not most commercial stores when shopping for all scales. Even when not precisely located, it may still appropriately be called a bathroom scale. I believe in a culture differing from that of U.S. the combination of both these words, ...


2

Refer can be a direct reference; it has multiple meanings The verb refer has several meanings (or different shades of meaning). One of these is: refer to [somebody/something] -- phrasal verb B2 to talk or write about someone or something, especially in only a few words: In her autobiography she occasionally refers to her unhappy ...


6

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/whether-you-say-freakin-friggin-or-frickin-depends-on-where-youre-from In this case, it's used as a softened version of the F-word.


0

There + is/are/was/were/have been/has been/had been refers to the existence of someone or something. In other words, there + verb be means exist. Existing is the gerund form of exist, and there being is the gerund form of there is etc. Too much fantasy exists in children's fiction. Does anyone worry about too much fantasy existing in children's ...


0

In formal writing, we use a clause with there being to introduce a reason for something. There being basically refers to something like ‘because there is’: There being no evidence against him, Frank is unlikely to be convicted. (= Because there is no evidence against him…) There being only one train every alternate day to the Balkans, he decided to fly. ...


1

In this context, "rubbish" is strictly British. Along with "lorry", "flat", and "petrol", it's one of the common words that show up on lists of differences between the two countries, and how to immediately tell someone is likely to be from the UK (aside from the accent, of course). Americans do say "rubbish", but not normally as a metaphor for something of ...


1

Signing the contract was a great victory / triumph for me. Both are figurative in meaning, and the choice depends on how much you want to emphasize your emerging as victor. I'd prefer the former over the latter because in this particular instance, a triumph is already great enough, so a victory is what I think would be the usual choice. In an example (...


2

For all of these examples except the fourth, I would choose victory. The reasons why are a little different for each, so I'll do my best to explain them individually. The differences between these words are few and relatively minor, but one to take note of is that a triumph is very explicitly made against something or someone in particular, whereas a victory ...


5

Regarding "the dishes": A dish, in my area of the USA is more often called "a plate". It is a flat, usually round thing made from plastic, glass, or ceramic that you put non-liquid food on and eat from. However, the dishes can either mean a collection of plates, (especially as compared to bowls, as in "put the dishes here and the bowls there"), but most ...


3

(a) The film was a real rubbish. NO (a) This car is a rubbish. NO (b) This car is a lemon YES The word rubbish is an uncountable noun, you cannot count "rubbish" individually. The correct way to state the OP's sample sentences would be This car is rubbish That film was rubbish That film was really rubbish Man, this job is rubbish. ...


13

In my experience, silverware is the most common term for metal eating utensils (forks, knives, spoons), though flatware is also perfectly acceptable. I've also heard and used cutlery to describe this set of items, though in the U.S., cutlery can also refer to kitchen knives of all kinds. Crockery is very common to refer to ceramic dish sets, also just ...


1

It means a "longer and more detailed discussion". In this context a discussion is probably not a spoken conversation, but a piece of academic writing that considers multiple points of view. Programmers in C++ should avoid using namespace std. For a fuller discussion of why this is the case, read the answers to Why is “using namespace std;” considered bad ...


0

Your assumption is correct. The explanation is that each decimal place can be added in a separate thread, and then the results summed. E.G. 2345 +5678 ----- Thread A adds 5+8, gets 13 Thread B adds 4[0]+7[0], gets 110 Thread C adds 3[00] + 6[00], gets 900 Thread D adds 2[000] + 5[000], gets 7,000 Finally, a new thread would add those results. Not ...


1

"Opposite" cannot go in either slot. Opposite is very specific; it must be a mirror image of X in reverse on the other end of the spectrum. "Contrary" describes something that is just NOT X but can be anywhere along the spectrum. It is far less precise.


0

Require is a chosen restriction or policy imposed with thought and some element of fore-planning. It can be changed if desired to do so. There is little grey area to this term. A need is by nature, simplistic, and not optional.


1

Such uses of "in the" may date back to when hell, or heaven, were commonly regarded as actual places that a person could be in. But few if any, people who now use such phrases still take that view. When this is combined with the use of minced oaths where part of the original expression is replaced with one of a similar sound or spelling, but a completely ...


3

These are purely idiomatic phrases, there is no systematic pattern of grammar here. Other similar examples "What the devil..." or the minced oath "What the Dickens..." And if I may advise, if you need to ask about an offensive or insulting phrase, then you don't know enough to use it convincingly.


1

The original post's suggestions are grammatically correct. Their literal meaning is also semantically correct. The "at me" examples are more consistent with the intended meaning than the "to me" examples, but the "to me" examples are accurate enough. But none of the original post's examples convey the original poster's intent. The original poster's ...


0

The word "in" is used as an intensifier. The extra syllable adds emphasis to the exclamation. Additional words can be added in to further build on the intensity: What the hell What in the hell What in the damn hell What in the God damn hell What in the ever living God damn hell etc.


2

I am never ever going to use this. Never ever is an intensifier Question form: When am I ever going to use this? In the background of this particular interrogative usage, there is always this idea of the declarative with never ever. Please note: The expectation of this type of question is a negative answer. These types of question can also be somewhat ...


0

The general rule is the one below. anyone/anybody etc. are exactly the same. No difference at all. Somebody ate all the bread. [declarative pronoun] Did anybody eat all the bread? [interrogative pronoun] [The expectation is that a person OR Did somebody eat all the bread? [alternative interrogative pronoun] Nobody ate the bread. It's on the table. [...


0

In the sentence above, ever means if the person is actually going to use it at least once. The person is questioning whether they will actually need the item and if it will ever benefit them.


-2

In a simple way Mention is used to describe something in detail Nd point out is also used to describe something but in a brief nd straight forward manner....


2

I'd like to point out that you are correct on many counts: The two words have similar, overlapping meanings. You could use pointed out in some of those sentences, and they would still be grammatical and sound natural. Here is one that I think is troublesome, though: My wife pointed out seeing you the other day on the street. I don't think that one ...


1

To summarise the comments by myself and @FumbleFingers: Don't point! - An adult aggressively "squaring up" to another adult showing such disrespect probably wouldn't want to use this language since it's considered something one would say to a child i.e. "child-centric" language. An exception would be if it was expressed in a roundabout way, such as ...


-1

Basically I understand for “doorman” and “porter”, the man who is in the front of the hotel and who can helps with the luggage. Although Nothing James has said is incorrect I think there is a need to expand his answer. By definition A Porter can be a Doorman but a Doorman is not a Porter. Therefore you thoughts that they are the same is not far from the ...


2

It could be two jobs. The doorman stands at the door and welcomes guests. Typically he would stay at the door all day. Typically this would be an older gentleman. The porter works inside the hotel, carrying bags. Typically this would be a young man. Most hotels don't have traditional "doormen" anymore, but may have "security" at the door. You might see ...


1

Pointing a finger at someone may indeed be rude. Pointing a finger to someone is usually not rude at all. The reason is that these imply different contexts. Pointing at someone is an aggressive gesture often indicating accusation. The prosecutor pointed at the defendant as she addressed the jury. "Ladies and gentleman," she exclaimed, "the state ...


0

The general meaning of adjoined is: close to or in contact with one another from m-w.com a room, building, or piece of land that adjoins something is next to it and connected to it from Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English In the specific context of hotel rooms, it refers to rooms that are physically next to each other, sharing a wall; and ...


2

If you look at the definition of as, you'll find this: Definition of as (Entry 4 of 9) ... : in the capacity, character, condition, or role of This is exactly the sense of as that is being used in your example: There's work we can do in our role of doctors to improve the experience for families as well as patients.


4

This is less about English than racing terminology. It helps if you understand drag (friction caused by the flow of air around the car) and how drafting (riding closely behind another car) reduces this drag. "First" in this case refers to "First Place". If you draft behind the lead car you can use the temporary reduced drag to slip around at the last ...


1

Let me preface my breakdown by saying this: connotations are everything. This is difficult as an ELL, since you're less likely to have heard enough context surrounding these words to get a proper feel for them. My answer will largely focus on these connotations, which are inherently highly subjective, so I welcome other answers to support mine. 1) Let's ...


1

Since this is an imperative sentence, the implied subject is you. So, the object pronoun must be a reflexive pronoun. A reflexive pronoun is used when the object of the verb is the same as the subject. Since the person is sending a picture of themselves, you would have to use the reflexive pronoun yourself. Of yours implies possession, so if you were to ...


51

A studio is a working space for an artist. a: the working place of a painter, sculptor, or photographer b: a place for the study of an art (such as dancing, singing, or acting)


0

Your examples are a "rhetorical" use of the word "endeavour". The meaning is still "an attempt to do something new", but it has lots of good associations: It suggests exploration and discovery; excitement and the potential for great success. So when we are saying goodbye to a colleague we could say: John is leaving this company. He wants to find another ...


4

One of the meanings in the dictionary you cited, Merriam-Webster, does fit. It's definition 2e in the entry of land in the verb sense: to complete successfully by landing An example is given as: the skater landed all her jumps The jumps referred to in this example are most likely those of a figure skater, though they may also be skateboarding tricks. ...


1

To "land" something means to successfully get or achieve something. For example: Alice landed a great job offer. means that Alice got a great job offer. Similarly, to "land" a trick means that you successfully did whatever it was: jump up, twirl the board around, and then return to the ground without falling. I suspect that the origin of the term in ...


1

The literal difference between these sentences is simply one of time limiting. "What was the most painful experience you have ever experienced as a mother" would be "from the time you became a mother until now, what was your most painful experience?" — if you choose to interpret the questions completely literally. However, when people ask these ...


2

The first sentence is spoken by someone who is a mother. It could be rephrased "I am a mother and I warn you", They are speaking from the point of view of a mother. The second sentence is saying "If I were a mother I would warn you" the speaker is not necessarily a mother or even female. They are saying what they think a mother would say.


3

Neither quite works. "Backroom" is nothing to do with TV. It refers to actions done in secret, often illegally The banks are alleged to have made a backroom deal to manipulate exchange rates. "Backstage" is possible, but tends to mean where the presenters or actors prepare. Jack waited backstage, practising his lines in his head. In a TV studio, ...


2

The antecedent of "it", here is "Pakistan". The text says that Pakistan will take up the matter with the Security Council. "Take up" is a phrasal verb with many meanings, and this is closest to sense 5 inn the linked def. To "take up a matter with someone" is to raise or discuss that matter with that person, or if it is a group or body, to raise it before ...


3

The following code does not compile It's just as valid as "The dynamite does not explode" and "the car does not run". Why doesn't the dynamite explode? Because it's defective. Why doesn't the code compile? Because it's defective. Why doesn't the car run? Because it's defective. What I assume to be correct are expressions like "is/was/has/been ...


2

The context here is important, because the verb "to pass" has a specific technical meaning in computer programming. It refers to the act of transferring data from one piece of code to another, often as an "argument" to a function. Here, it seems the code is passing some data to something called a "convolutional base," a term I'm not familiar with but which ...


1

"Duty free" is specific to imports, duty is a fee that you pay when you import goods. "Duty free" is not the right term. "Tax exempt" is a property of the product that means that sales tax is not raised on it. For example, in the UK, Foodstuffs are exempt from VAT. Accountants might say that actually food is "zero-rated", but it comes to the same thing. ...


3

Following up on the comments to JamesK's answer: "The iron bar bent" is actually a really great analogy. Both "bent" and "compiled" can be used either transitively or intransitively to describe actual action: The wrench bent the iron bar. — GCC compiled the code. The iron bar bent. — The code compiled. Like almost any English verb, both "bend" and "...


2

A "grocery store" can be any store where a variety of foodstuffs and related items are sold. It can be a "supermarket" or a smaller, more specialized store. Today, in the US, most people buy most of their groceries in "supermarkets" or something similar -- large, multi-department stores selling meat, fish, produce, canned goods, dry goods such as pasta and ...


6

In this sentence, "as" is a preposition. It means "In the role of": It forms a prepositional phrase which describes the role of the speaker. A person can have many roles in their life, and sometimes we want to emphasise that we are speaking with a particular expertise or perspective: As a parent, I am concerned about youth crime. In this case, the ...


0

Mostly “As” is used when you you are comparing two different things having some common similarities. Here are some basic uses:- Adverb- used for comparisons Eg: Her voice is sweet as honey. 2.Conjunction -to join 2 sentences(in the place of 'because') Eg: She did not go to school as she was not feeling well. 3.Preposition Eg: He was selected as the ...


40

Both usages are now valid. It is possible for a verb to develop meanings and, in particular, it can develop an intransitive sense from a transitive one. If you went back and talked to people in the 1940s, then "compile" didn't have anything to do with electronic computers. It just meant "assemble information" In the 1950s and 60s the meaning "convert ...


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