New answers tagged

1

"Dug-in" here means "committed to" or "determined on". It is a metaphor from a soldier dug-in in a foxhole or trench to resist attack while staying in place. "But he's fundraising off of this" means that he is using the events, and his public statements, to raise money. "off of" here means "based on"...


1

First of all it should end either as void or solid. Since the voxels (volume pixels) are three dimensional structures they can either be empty or full so void or solid. If they were just pixels and two dimensional they would probably be classified as either black or white.


1

I have never seen fluster used intransitively. The OED has such a form, but the sense is "To be excited or eager; to move with agitation or confusion; to bustle", i.e. mostly about agitated movement, rather than about inner state; and where it is about inner state it is excitement not confusion. (The latest quotation is from 1893, but the entry may ...


2

wiktionary shows five meanings of "rep": (informal) Clipping of reputation. (weightlifting, countable) Clipping of repetition. (informal) Clipping of representative. (theater) Clipping of repertory. (military, in combination) Clipping of report. It almost certainly means "representative" here. Notice that the tweeter is dropping ...


3

No, "from" does not correspond to "prosecuted". The relevant phrase is "a different magnitude from". It's clearer if you break it into two: Ms. Ellis prosecuted crimes like theft and assault. These felonies were a different magnitude from the claims she makes today. In other words, when she started out she was prosecuting ...


1

I think this is quite a casual sentence structure so the grammar is relaxed a bit. The sentence may be more clear to you if we rephrase it: "I can tell that everyone around us seems to agree by the way they fiddle with their phones" The definiton of by used here is: "used to show how something is done" The 'something that is being done' ...


1

There's more leeway when discussing capabilities or tendencies to use the object of a verb as its subject. For instance: "I don't scare easily." vs. "Other people don't scare me easily.""This food keeps a long time" vs. "You can keep this food for a long time." Other verbs that this applies to include "embarrass&...


2

"Skim" is not a general synonym for "remove" and it is probably not advisable to use it in general to mean remove. The original meaning is specifically to remove the cream that floats to the top of milk. From this there is a metaphoric meaning of "to select the richest or most preferable part of something". One might speak of a ...


1

For example, the cream is skimmed from the milk. Skim is used in this context to imply that the cream has floated to the top of the milk and is being removed by passing something under the layer of cream. This is why the word skim is used as it means exactly this. Skim is used in other ways, but it almost always has to do with the meaning of being "...


1

Tthe construction "There hasn't been any semblance of an X" (wherever X may be) is often used to mean that there not only hasn't been X, but that there hasn't been anything resembling or approximating X, indeed that there hasn't been any hint of X. It is a stronger statement than "There hasn't been any X". This is a not uncommon ...


4

The definition you gave for "semblance" is correct for this context. By "there hasn't been any semblance of a DOJ investigation" they mean "there hasn't been anything close to what could be considered a DOJ investigation." In other words, they don't believe a DOJ investigation has taken place.


1

I am a scientist and I have the (probably wrong) impression that it is better to speak about the dependence of a quantity y on a quantity x than about its dependency. I feel dependency is more for dependency on drugs, for example. Dependency, again as I feel it, implies a privation of freedom for who is dependent, while dependence does not. I can make a ...


1

With these kind of scenarios we tend to say 'Try to' 'Try to avoid making fun of Joe.' 'Try to avoid breaking your leg on the way down.' These do not portray the idea of 'Never' The idea behind it is like saying 'Do not' in a subtle tone.


2

“avoid” allows exceptions. “never”, at least in theory, does not. For instance, I avoid shellfish because I don’t like the taste, but I’ll eat it if I’m hungry enough. My sister never eats shellfish because she’s allergic and could die. In a programming context, “avoid” is often used to caution people to not do things that are generally a bad idea. But if ...


-1

I believe Bruce explained it perfectly. The meaning of the phrase 'he was there for' in that context literally means that he was there when the problem occured (or was part of it).


2

"Want" means (as usual) desire. But the meaning when somebody says "You don't want this" is "If you think about it, you will realise that this is not something you should desire". Advisers told Trump that, if he considered the consequences, he would realise that putting the federal government in charge of elections is not in ...


1

It is rather odd for me. I do see this in some writing styles, and I take it to be a way of trying to represent the internal feelings of Herb, rather than describe the outer appearance of his actions. It is a shortened version of "Herb looks in the pram. He is suspicious". So "suspicious" is an adjective, not an adverb. It describes Herb,...


5

A portmanteau word ... is a blend of words in which parts of multiple words are combined into a new word, as in smog, coined by blending smoke and fog, or motel, from motor and hotel. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portmanteau Oilscape (like seascape and mindscape) is formed by joining a descriptive noun to the ending "scape" by analogy with ...


7

It's not a standard word. They are just being creative with the description. It is indeed an "oil landscape." Which is to say, the landscape has a lot of oil wells, so the main things you see in that landscape are all related to oil drilling. The roads are there to get to the oil wells. The vehicles are there to get to the oil wells. The ...


1

One of use of "apparent" (likewise "apparently") is literal - the word means that something is observable. The other use is the opposite - it suggests that some people claim to have observed it, but you have yet to see anything convincing yourself. It could be described as a sarcastic use of the word, and often is said in a sarcastic tone....


1

I was surprised to see that the dictionary definitions of these two adjectives are so similar, but the examples given for each are in line with how I am used to seeing them used in context. Experiential tends to be used to describe things like training or learning - things that perhaps 'intangible'. I've seen experimental theatre described as 'experiential' ...


1

They are both correct as you have identified. There is an implication of dissapointmeant with both of these phrases so I wouldn't say it's necessarily correct that 'live up to' suggests higher expectations. "I thought the movie was going to be amazing but it didn't meet my expectations" is a perfectly natural sentence and clearly suggests high ...


1

Yes, they mean the same thing. Yes, “with each other" is redundant. EDIT: As the comment below points out, I did not address We have still kept in touch. Because “keeping in touch” implies a continuing process, the use of the present perfect does not make much sense to imply recent past. If that is what is intended, one way to express that thought is ...


1

Yes. "The developing storm, were it to become a cyclone on Tuesday, will be called NIVAR" means the same as " If the developing storm becomes a cyclone on Tuesday, it will be called NIVAR" From Google definitions for 'were': Used to hypothesize about something that might happen. Example: "if I were to lose"


1

Yes. That it exactly what it means here. If you look on the google defintion you will see this entry: "have personal experience of (an emotion or situation)." That is the usage here as you have identified.


0

I performed speech transcription for course recordings using a computer technology. I understand that you are trying to say, in a bullet point, that you have experience using a computer to digitally transcribe some recordings of your course classes into text. If that is the case then there are a few things you should consider: If the computer did the ...


1

English teacher depicts any teacher whose nationality is England, but teacher of English language refers to any one whose profession is to teach English language. Let us go with this to avoid the ambiguity since we have teachers from other countries also in the profession of teaching English language.


2

Whiplash literally means injuries that result from the sudden accelerations and changes in direction that occur (for example) in a car crash. As your body is thrown forward, you can damage your neck. Your head "whips" forward and back (which is why cars have head restraints) The first example suggests that the sudden changes in style are confusing ...


0

In my opinion in the extract the word "commitment to do sth" is used in a sense "willingness to do sth" rather then "an oath of doing sth". To put it in terms of your question, it clearly means determination to do what hasn't been done yet.


1

The link is behind a paywall. "Levelling" probably means that people are put on the same level, as opposed to one being a superior and one being an inferior. It's easier to decide whether you like someone when engaged in an activity that is shared between humans as equals.


1

"Hunchback" can refer to both the condition of a bent back, and the person who has that condition. While it would be insulting to use it as a noun to mean another person, you could use it to describe yourself. So an alternative is ... becoming a hunchback... If I were using "getting" or "developing", I think I'd actually say &...


4

I think that "Developing a hunchback" is the right answer. I don't think "getting a hunchback" is idiomatically correct. When I googled the phrase "Getting a hunchback," the only thing I could find with the world "get" and "Hunchback" together was this video which had in its description the phrase "get ...


1

I believe that they would both technically be correct, the difference being in the context in which you are using it. In your second example, about the international students, saying 'the others are from China' implies that they are part of a separate group or entity. But by saying 'the rest are from china' it implies that the remainder of the group, the ...


3

To me, pack implies a common purpose or goal between the members of the group. Bunch is more just describing that they are together, but in a more haphazard way. For example, in a jail you may find a bunch of thieves because they were all caught for different reasons. On the other hand, a pack of thieves are all working together. The connotation is similar ...


0

The use of the phrase last Friday morning is not just to depict a day but also to show that it is past now. In other words, the poet uses this phrase in order to tell that time never stops. Everything in the world goes in the past. The poet probably tries to compare her mother with last Friday morning as both had their springtime (mother was young and the ...


2

A thimble is a tiny metal cup that is placed over a finger when sewing: they come in different sizes, depending on the size of your finger, but typically have a capacity of 2-5 ml. When used to describe liquids, it means a very very small, probably insufficient, amount of liquid. Your first link describes the miniature bottles of spirits found in hotel ...


2

Silly as it may seem, [...] As silly as it may seem, [...] There is not much difference between the two phrases. They are almost interchangeable in many cases, and convey the same meaning in both cases. The phrase in the first case is stripped of the adverb. I am not sure if this special case is called something in English, perhaps someone else may assist ...


1

Suspicious is an attitude: the way you feel toward somebody. It may have no objective grounds at all, and needn't be tied to any particular event - indeed, there may not have been any relevant event at all. Suspect (a person) is a verb, meaning something like "consider or hold the possibility that the person is responsible for a particular act that has ...


1

In the context here only No one knows who killed her, but police suspect Sam. is correct. It means that the police have some evidence against Sam or some other reason to suspect him/her but perhaps not yet enough to arrest or bring a formal charge. Members of the general public might be suspicious of Sam as they do not trust them to behave legally but that ...


2

Dynasty means a succession of rulers, all from the same family. In monarchies, historians can describe different dynasties: In the England there were the Plantaganet, Tudor, Stuart, and Hanover dynasties. In Ancient Egypt the dynasties are numbered from 1 to more than 30. In China the dynasties are named after the clan name of the ruling kings In China in ...


0

It fits. It's a synonym in this context of "think about". So, it means Why don't people think about what they do? It's an expression of regret that people do things without considering (thinking about) the likely results.


1

American Heritage Dictionary "plateau" intr.v. To reach a stable level; level off: The tension seemed to grow by degrees, then it plateaued. A plateau is a raised area of ground with a flat top. The figurative use here means that the support for Harrison's campaign was rising, and then it stopped rising and stayed level, as a plateau does.


1

Time is a resource, quite like money. You can spend it on an activity, and you might have some that you can spare for something unexpected (like a request from a friend). So these are likely sentences: "Can you spare ten minutes to help me with this?" "Let's spend an hour looking for the problem.


5

They're effectively opposites that fit together. To spare time is to avoid doing anything (else) for that period of time. To spend time doing something is to occupy yourself with something for that period of time.  (You wouldn't normally speak of ‘spending time’ without specifying what you were doing.) So you can spare some time in order to spend it on ...


5

"Spend time" is simply a statement. You may have plenty of uncommitted time, and spending some of it with loved ones is just what you do. "Spare time" implies that you really have other things you'd rather do with that time, so you're making a sacrifice to spend it with loved ones.


1

See Merriam Webster's definition of call: to describe correctly in advance of or without knowledge of the event : PREDICT He called the upward trend of the stock market in February. "[T]elevision networks called the election for Joe Biden" means "the networks predicted the winner of the election would be Joe Biden."


1

One can propose a plan of action, e.g. 'he proposed a new nine-point peace plan', but as with bsod, I would suggest that it is inappropriate without a suggested plan or action. Propose (Lexico)


7

To spend time means to do something during that time. One can spend time with family, taking a walk, working, idling. To spare time means that something that came up that could use up some of your time. If you spare it some time, you then spend some time on it. The sparing is generally when it's scheduled -- even if it's immediate.


11

You ask someone else is they can spare the time for something. Excuse me, could you please spare a few moments of your time? If you refer to yourself I can spare some time to talk to you it makes you sound self-important or condescending. In the context of your loved ones, again it makes it seem that they are unimportant, if you say you can spare some ...


1

It depends on the context of the passage. Usually one proposes something for some form of consideration, in this case perhaps by people who are debating the consequences of having lots of words in a language. One person may put forward one point of view and Bill would propose an alternate point of view. However, if Bill is merely putting forward this idea ...


Top 50 recent answers are included