New answers tagged

1

In this context, yes, it seems ‘nature’ and ‘natural environment’ can be used interchangeably - since ‘natural environment’, here, is referring to the nature in said environment. As you seem to have already noticed, the terms cannot always be used for the same reason. For example, ‘nature’ can be used to describe natural surroundings as well as the ...


0

Receipts here refers to sales income - the money s/he receives from selling the products. So the passage is saying that the manufacturer decides on a level of production that will bring him/her an acceptable profit. Increasing his/her production would raise costs as much as the increased income from sales. That's to say that it would bring the ...


1

In robotics, position refers to the (x,y,z) coordinates of an object, while pose refers to both the position (3D) and orientation (3D) of an object.


2

"Cost effective" means that it is good value. It has a very "business English" style. If you say the train is "cost effective" you are saying that you or your company will can increase your profits by using the train compared to other forms of transport. "Affordable" means that something is quite cheap. Literally it means that many people would be able to ...


1

Here "run through" means essentially, "fed as input to acquire the results of (to see what came out)."


2

Gimp is a slur for someone with a disability or physical deformity. It has also come to mean someone incapable or incompetent. The ADHS finds usages dating from the 1920s, many of them referring to someone with a bad leg who therefore limps. However, there is an earlier (1877) adjectival usage meaning inferior, second-rate. The expression on the gimp seems ...


1

45 million (is the number given), millions more=other millions, not specified as to how many millions exactly. In a text that says millions more (or more millions) some number of millions has already been specified. There is no way to tell exactly how many "millions more" this is exactly. millions more or more millions always means the same thing ...


2

As is already pointed out in the comments from @Michael: The best answer you are going to get will be based on the dictionary meanings of 'molest', e.g. (Cambridge Dictionary) "to touch or attack someone in a sexual way against their wishes", and "to touch, push, etc. someone violently" From this, we can infer that rape is a type of molestation, but not ...


0

The construction, "had X been Y ..." means essentially, "X was not Y, but in an alternate universe where X was Y ..." For example, I would have ordered chicken soup if it had been on the menu. or Had proper security been in place, the prisoner would still be in his cell.


0

Yes, your use of "on which" is correct here. When one refers to websites, the preposition used most often is "on". Another example to illustrate this is, "The information can be found on our website, which is very well organised". Changing things around a little in order to use "on which", this would become: "Our website, on which the information can be ...


0

I feel that either are acceptable and idiomatic. When referring to content, we do say that things are "on" a website - this has already been answered here. "Where" can refers either to a place or a situation/condition. As you are talking about administrators and policy I'm going to guess that you work in computing - do you know what a WHERE clause is in ...


0

Their special work in this case, means the "North American aborigines" appearing in spirit form. Nature of an expiation and atonement means that this is payment for something they've done. The author contends that these spirits have told him that the reason they manifest in spirit form in the presence of a medium is to atone for something. The author ...


1

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/wrath http://www.learnersdictionary.com/definition/enraged https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/livid You will notice, the Merriam Webster definitions seem to be very similar. In usage, I would say there is an order or strength. From weakest to strongest Livid-Enrage-Wrath Wrath is slightly archaic and ...


0

As the final sentence of the short chapter, He launches forth. on the face of it, simply means, “He sets off.”, “He starts forward.” However, the word choice here adds considerably more to the meaning. Using the dramatic “launches” rather than a simpler synonym like “starts” or “begins” gives the sense that it is a significant undertaking that is ...


1

They appear to be Saxon- and Latin-rooted words which are essentially synonymous, with only slight variations in usage: OED says grave is from Old English from Saxon from German from Norse, ultimately from grafan (to dig) with meanings including: a. A place of burial; an excavation in the earth for the reception of a corpse; †formerly often applied ...


-1

He launches forth. means simply "He starts forward". It has many possible meanings and echoes beyond that, probably better suited to Literature stack exchange than here. You will see in comments disagreement about what overtones are implied and what exactly was started.


0

As written, the statement implies that you had prior knowledge that something was happening in Libya, and you turned the TV on specifically to get more information. If you were to say this instead (using '... and found out ...' as per Kate Bunting's suggestion in the comments): "Last Sunday night I turned on the TV, and found out what was happening in ...


0

Thanks, Kate. You are correct. Migration is any movement. To use immigration or emigration you need a specified source of destination. All immigrants are also emigrants, and vice versa. Thus, when speaking generally about movements of people without a specified country you would use “migration”. The question being asked, specifically, was whether the ...


0

Hint: noun 1. a slight or indirect indication or suggestion. "he has given no hint of his views" 2. a small piece of practical information or advice. "handy hints on saving energy in your home" verb suggest or indicate something indirectly or covertly. "the Minister hinted at a possible change of heart" Clue: noun 1. ...


-1

Talking about putting a child "down" does indeed mean that the adult has forced/coerced the child to sleep. Is this common? Yes, very, at least where I am (west coast USA). If this doesn't sound common to you, it is probably because this use of the word "down" is used almost exclusively for children. This can also be used with adults, but it has a very ...


1

In this case “down” most likely means “lying in a relatively low position, like in a bed, in a crib, even in the floor. Down has many meanings, like “depressed” (but babies are usually not depressed), “destroyed” (there was a gunfight until the shooter was down), it might mean “on the ground floor” and many other meanings. The “ghost busters” joke: “...


0

This is an idiom (expression): be down, which means that one is(feels) sad, generally unwell. eg. I was down this morning. (=I was depressed this morning ) In the example of yours, the baby might have cried for 3 hours. This was taken from my dictionary, I could be wrong.


0

In 1983, mobile as a noun meant a type of sculpture (Wikipedia) The OED gives mobile n 4 as coming from French usage of 1931. a. A sculpture consisting of hanging or pivoting pieces of metal, plastic, etc., in abstract or (more recently) representational shapes, connected by wires and threads so as to be able to move and rotate in response to air ...


-4

The word "innocent" means "An innocent person is someone who is not involved with any military group or war", or the second meaning is "having no knowledge of the unpleasant and evil things in life:, or "not intended to harm anyone". Resource from Cambridge dictionary


24

You should check more dictionaries. I have heard of Longman's dictionary, but it certainly isn't the top choice. For British English, always check Oxford and Cambridge dictionaries. I believe Google uses Oxford as default. For American English, check Websters. Oxford has the following as a primary definition for "innocent": without; lacking. "a street ...


20

You are correct, it means "entirely lacking" but carries a slight sense of humour: if it was logical it would be "guilty of making sense". OED gives innocent of as "Free from; devoid of" with a humourous sense. The earliest recorded use in 1706 is very similar to your quotation: The Opera .. Enrich'd with songs, but innocent of thought (J. Addison ...


1

Neither is ideal. Both "warming" and "heating" are used as verbs that operate on an object, for example: John is heating his soup. John is the subject, soup is the object, and it is the soup which is actually getting heated. When you omit an object, it may still be assumed that there is one, for example: Soup is warming. This can mean that soup has ...


0

All of your examples contain the so-called past participle. One of your examples includes a clear passive-voice present-tense construction in the first clause: His novel is based on historical occurrences but it blurs the line between fact and fiction. An active-voice counterpart is easy to construct: the author based his novel on historical ...


0

I see your point as 'compared' and 'based' are perfect passive participles. Nevertheless, if at all, we only become aware of the passivity if we speak about actions - best if they're ongoing. As soon as the action is done and we only have a result of it the sense of passivity vanishes. The meal is being prepared by the cook. (pretty strong awareness) The ...


1

The sentence is incomplete and erroneous, at this point. Your friend might have meant I trust you, you're the admin, or something of that sort. Like the second comment under the question suggests, ask your friend.


3

The expression assuming all goes as it should is equivalent to if everything proceeds as intended or if everything works out as planned. Depending on how it is used, all can act as any of several parts of speech. In this case, all is acting as a singular noun and takes a singular verb. If all were used to refer to a number of items or individuals, it ...


2

Logical nonsense perhaps. Most language is illogical. "Caretaker" is a fairly old word, it means someone who "takes care" of a house or particularly a school. It could, I suppose, be generalised in a story to someone who takes care of a whole planet. You should understand "care" here means "charge, oversight, attention or heed with a view to safety or ...


5

Here is a picture of a mobile like the one in the question Also a puzzle about one:


0

I love pictures in You Tube video. A picture thousand words!


1

In this case, definition 3 is correct, because the participants are uneasy over the problems caused by the mentioned breakup of the E.U. and U.K.


0

Maybe the word that you're looking for is "dubbed." I'm not entirely sure that I understand what you're asking, but I'm assuming that you mean that the sound clip was recorded after the video was made, instead of using the live audio. (I'm also making that assumption because the Spanish word for 'dubbed' is 'doblado' which also means 'double' in English.) ...


2

Yes, "disgusting" can be a good thing. In the context of video games and also in sports, it's common to hear negative words used in a positive way. This is a slang usage. The actual meaning intended is often close to the exact opposite of the word's normal meaning. Urban Dictionary gives us a pretty good definition in this case: so impressive or ...


2

Unfortunately, the teacher is incorrect. Immigration is moving to another non-native country. For instance, you live in India and apply for Permanent Residence to Canada, then you file for immigration. We have professional immigration consultants. On the other hand, emigration is going out of a country. See the fun - when you get your PR to Canada, you ...


2

"Emigrate" is not used when discussing moving from one place to another within the same country. I would say that "move" is appropriate in that context. "Emigrate"/"Immigrate" are used when talking about different countries. Let's say you are currently living in Australia but you are going to go and live in South Africa. You would then be emigrating from ...


2

Immigrate is entering a country. Emigrating is leaving it.


2

A grave is specifically a burial site. A stone recording the deceased person's name can be called a gravestone or tombstone. As you say, tomb usually implies a more elaborate memorial structure. The fact that the deceased lived long ago is not part of the definition, but for the last century or so it hasn't been the custom to put up such showy memorials. ...


2

I think the verb "insult" does not apply to the "mass". Let's think about the examples like below. Jeff insulted Tom. (It's OK) Jeff offended Tom (OK) Whereas, Jeff insulted the United Kingdom (? How? Is Jeff a president of some country or some existence bigger than the UK?) Jeff offended the United Kingdom (Sounds OK. Jeff's word or action ...


-1

Usually 'sir' when used on an ordinary person, refers to their knighthood, which they receive as an honour for doing something notable, like acting or being rich. Famous examples include Sir Roger Moore or Sir Richard Branson. As for professors, from Wikipedia, 'Sir', along with Miss for females, is commonly used in the British school system to address ...


4

It would have been helpful if the OP had mentioned that the sentence comes, as Google reveals, from the Wikipedia page about John Houghton (c. 1486 – 4 May 1535), a Carthusian hermit and Catholic priest. The 'house' here is the London Charterhouse, which was, prior to the reign of Henry VIII, a Roman Catholic monastery belonging to the Carthusian Order. ...


3

These brambles are snarled (tangled together). They are a snarl of brambles.


1

To snarl means as verbs 1 : to cause to become knotted and intertwined : TANGLE 2 : to make excessively complicated Snarl means as a noun is 1 : a tangle especially of hairs or thread : KNOT 2 : a tangled situation traffic snarls Bramble is a kind of plant. Snarl of brambles means that a situation branches of brambles are intertwined or knotted.


6

“Soon” is a measure of time relative to the starting point; “early” is a measure of time relative to the ending point. If someone left only a few minutes after arrival you would say “why are you leaving so soon?”. This could be even if it is already the scheduled end time. If someone left long before the scheduled end time you would say “why are you leaving ...


1

Beer is an effervescent drink because it contains bubbles in it. If the beer is flat, that means the bubbles have gone from it. Some people might describe a beer as flat, meaning that it has less bubbles they expect. Americans often find English ales to be warm and flat. Certainly, a cask-conditioned ale is less "fizzy" than a keg lager, but it should ...


0

A "flat" carbonated beverage (such as beer or soda) is one whose carbon dioxide content has decreased, due to being shaken, diluted by melted ice, sitting out too long, or any other reason. We don't normally describe non-carbonated beverages as "flat."


0

I think that Merriam-Webster offers the correct meaning of bear in this context: b: to call for as suitable or essential it bears watching There is also an entry for the expression "It bears repeating that..." which means "to be important enough to state more than once". So "It bears admitting..." means that it's important enough, or maybe essential, ...


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