4

So here's a couple of things: This is Peppy the Inspirational Cat. Drawn by October Jones (who also did "Text from Dog.) He used to leave these on trains and take pictures so original poster's picture is wrong. Anyway: Peppy delivers slightly "over the top" motivational messages. So when people say they hate Mondays, Peppy says "Don't hate Monday" meaning ...


4

Yes, we say "three wise monkeys". Imagine though if a fourth wise monkey joined the troop later on. We would describe the founding members as the original three wise monkeys. In most contexts, it wouldn't really matter which way around you said it. A new fourth member has joined the original three wise monkeys. or A new fourth member has joined the ...


3

A "creep" is someone (probably more likely to be male than female) who gives you a "creepy" feeling. I think a "creepy" feeling is when you feel like something unseen is creeping, or crawling, over the surface of your skin. Of course this is a folk etymology, so vote it down if you like, but I think it describes the meaning of the word very well. A creep is ...


3

Neither of these is wrong, and the obviously intended meaning is the same. To me as a native speaker of US-English I came here from England for my education seems much more natural. The other sentence: I came here for my education from England tempts a reader to parse "my education from England" is if the education somehow came from England. A ...


2

No, the sentence doesn't sound right. In general, you would not use the existential "there" with a specific complement, anyway; it's more natural in this case to make "definitions" the subject with a passive voice: Several definitions for the term "listening" have been suggested. Otherwise, it would follow both the auxiliary verbs: There have been ...


1

Yes "Where do you and I stand?" is correct. However, the use of "me" in forms like "you and me" is sufficiently common that it is doubtful whether it can truly be called 'wrong". It is "non-standard", at least.


1

In the first sentence, it should be "how", not "now". How magnanimous of her to ignore all our weaknesses! "itinerary" is always a noun, and it usually goes with "to plan". It's planned by a person ("agent") who organises tours ("tour agent"). It's past time because of "did". "agent" is a subject. Did the tour agent plan the itinerary to your ...


1

I'm calling about a laptop I purchased. This is probably the most informal way to say it, although it isn't generally considered rude. See (preposition) definition 4. I'm calling concerning a laptop I purchased. This is slightly more formal than "about" but fundamentally means the exact same thing. Your example sentence sounds fine in normal speech ...


1

Sentence #2 is grammatical and idiomatic. Sentence #1 doesn't sound quite right. I don't think it's really because of the grammar, since an adverb would be appropriate modifying "is" (#1) or the adjective "sufficient" (#2). The problem is with the meaning of the combination "actually sufficient". Unless you are using some specialized vocabulary where "...


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