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If X is a stand-in for an actual, named algorithm, then X Algorithm is usually the correct construction. For example: The A* algorithm The DFS shortest path algorithm Kruskal's Algorithm The wikipedia page you cite isn't using "Algorithm A" to mean the same thing as "A* algorithm." It's using "Algorithm A" as shorthand for "Any algorithm, which we will ...


2

'Often' is an adverb, and while a few say adverbs should go before the verb, the order doesn't usually matter. Or, the order doesn't matter, usually. Or even, the order usually doesn't matter! There are three common positions for adverbs in a sentence: before the subject between the subject and the verb, or immediately after 'be' as a main verb at ...


1

This is not a good idiom to use. It's incorrect diction here and hard to understand. Instead, use "for the purpose of": The purpose of the component would not be to store electricity until needed for the purpose of energy recovery. Additionally, in technical writing, it is better to say what the purpose /is/, rather than what it is /not/, or to clearly ...


1

You would put "often" at the end of the sentence, like you did in your example. "I used to go skiing in the winter often." Or perhaps even better would be: "I used to go skiing often in the winter."


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Have had is the past perfect form of had. The English past perfect tense is complicated to explain, but a simple heuristic that applies here can be used. If you are going to say We've X Y, where Y is one of these words/phrases or something similar: before, previously, recently, "that I can remember", "since X", "until X" you use past perfect. You ...


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