5 votes
Accepted

Always Almost or Almost Always?

Yes there is a difference: You nearly burn yourself every time you cook You burn yourself nearly every time you cook So the first means you nearly burn yourself all the time, but it does not ...
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  • 5,517
3 votes

Always Almost or Almost Always?

DialFrost's answer is correct. I'm adding why. As with most adverbs in English, "almost" modifies whatever comes after it. I always [almost burn] myself when I cook. I [almost always] burn ...
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1 vote
Accepted

"He speaks better Spanish than I do" or "He speaks Spanish better than I do"

I don't think there is much difference in practice. It could be argued that (1) means that he speaks Spanish more fluently than I do, and (2) that his Spanish is more correct than mine - but I don't ...
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  • 30.8k
1 vote
Accepted

"Not to go to X" or "To not go to X"?

Both are correct. However "not to go" is more common than "to not go". Google search results: "excuse not to go" 1 330 000 "excuse to not go" 996 000 Google ...
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  • 1,388

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