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15 votes

"Is he not the carpenter's son?" v.s. "Is not he the carpenter's son?"

The KJV is over 400 years old. Because it is so well-known, contemporary speakers are able to understand much of it. Many of them have heard passages from it on a weekly basis for most of their lives,...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
12 votes

"Is he not the carpenter's son?" v.s. "Is not he the carpenter's son?"

It is clear and certain that the statement would be He is not the carpenter's son. That is the only possible position for the word "not". If this is contracted there are two possibilities,...
James K's user avatar
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3 votes

"Is he not the carpenter's son?" v.s. "Is not he the carpenter's son?"

English is my second language but in my understanding in the first sentence the focus is on him and in the second sentence the focus is on the carpenter's (son) that's why i would answer like that: &...
Vloxxity's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Where should I put “not” in the sentence 'The person admits to ___ having ___ read the book'?

To help assess the naturalness of the negated gerund, I've replaced "The person admits" with something more natural: The interviewer admitted to not having read the book. The interviewer ...
gotube's user avatar
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2 votes

"Is he not the carpenter's son?" v.s. "Is not he the carpenter's son?"

Purely focusing on my modern interpretation of the two sentence structures they might convey slightly different focus. "Not" is a strong word and it often puts emphasis/focus on whatever ...
xtratic's user avatar
  • 131

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