Skip to main content
15 votes
Accepted

Isn't there a preposition ("to") missing after "IP addresses that devices are allocated"?

There's a potential difference in meaning depending on whether we explicitly specify the preposition in contexts like the OP's example. a set of IP addresses that devices are allocated [to] With to, ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
15 votes

"Is he not the carpenter's son?" v.s. "Is not he the carpenter's son?"

The KJV is over 400 years old. Because it is so well-known, contemporary speakers are able to understand much of it. Many of them have heard passages from it on a weekly basis for most of their lives,...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
14 votes

Why is this kind of sentence still officially accepted?

— Who is the author of the article? — The author of the article is Allan Allandale. The answer tells us who the author of the article is. — Who is the author of the article? — Allan Allandale is the ...
Gilles 'SO- stop being evil''s user avatar
14 votes

Why is this kind of sentence still officially accepted?

You are broadly right. However, the thing in the box isn't a sentence. It is a dictionary definition. In a definition, you first have the the headword. It is often printed in bold. There is then a ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
12 votes

Why is this kind of sentence still officially accepted?

At the risk of upsetting the community: it is a common misconception that there are statutes governing English grammar, or some regulating authority which is mandated to determine what is "...
Mark Morgan Lloyd's user avatar
12 votes

"Is he not the carpenter's son?" v.s. "Is not he the carpenter's son?"

It is clear and certain that the statement would be He is not the carpenter's son. That is the only possible position for the word "not". If this is contracted there are two possibilities,...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
9 votes

"Both the local authority and <myself> <me> <I> have gone to the minister." — Do all these pronouns work here?

The general rule is to use the same pronoun you would use if it were alone rather than part of a list. So in the subject position, you use "Mary and I have gone", since you would say "I ...
Barmar's user avatar
  • 3,228
7 votes
Accepted

What's the meaning of "sundry great ships overspiring her from close without"?

You're right that the word order here is significant. However, it's not about emphasis but rather that without is not a preposition. From NOAD: adverb archaic or literary outside: the enemy without. ...
Laurel's user avatar
  • 15.6k
6 votes
Accepted

Is there something wrong with the noun phrase "the bear out term origin"?

There's a couple problems. The first is that in English, if we're talking about a word/phrase/term etc., we just say the word itself, "bear out", rather than "the bear out term". ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.8k
5 votes

Why do we use interrogative pattern in "So was I"?

It is a special use of so as a substitute. (By the way, other words know such usage, as for example neither or nor). Cambridge explains: So am I, so do I, Neither do I We use so with be and with ...
fev's user avatar
  • 9,545
5 votes

He composed me a piece of music vs he composed a piece of music for me

It seems to me less formal to speak of writing a piece of music. (The composers I know [in the UK] rarely say they're composing a piece for fear of sounding precious.) And we can certainly say, "...
Old Brixtonian's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Is the word order of this sentence correct?

Yes, both sentences are correct and have the same meaning. The second option, for me, adds some emphasis on the fact that they were disguised as guards.
Dan's user avatar
  • 2,717
4 votes

"geographically organized" information or "organized geographical" information?

Yes, both C and D are grammatically correct, but they have different meanings. C means the information is organized according to geography, and is probably the intended meaning. D means the ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.8k
4 votes
Accepted

Is "study abroad program" correct?

"study abroad program" should be considered a compound. Constructing compounds like this is possible. Here are some more examples: He painted a go faster stripe on his car. He used the ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
4 votes

What's the meaning of "sundry great ships overspiring her from close without"?

Sample: Norah Creina. Methought she looked smaller than ever, sundry great ships overspiring her from close without. The pronoun refers to the Norah Creina sailing ship sundry: various overspire: to ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 45.4k
4 votes
Accepted

Word order of "code blue"

Your first two examples, “the band Heart” and “the movie Up!” feature apposition, which is to say one noun phrase (NP) immediately following another and used to individuate or specify the earlier NP. ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Does use of superlative adjective affect the order of adjectives?

If one of the adjectives is a superlative, by definition this implies there are others of the same general type. So the youngest small man implies there are other small men who aren't so young, and ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
3 votes

Is Maria her name or is her name Maria?

The meanings are identical, and both are grammatically correct. However, the context may differ. If the speaker had just heard the word "Maria," and wondered if that might be the name of ...
Biblasia's user avatar
  • 1,532
3 votes

Give something to somebody vs Give somebody something

Many verbs of giving or showing are ditransitive in English, and allow these two different argument structures: I gave the keys to Sarah. <=> I gave Sarah the keys. Sarah showed the book to me....
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.8k
3 votes

"Here are" word order

Taken purely literally, they have the same meaning and they are deictic in the sense that the meaning of "here" is dependent on context. However, most native speakers would use them ...
TimothyAWiseman's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

"I have bought it" versus "I have it bought"

The two sentences have completely different meanings and structures. The first sentence is the present perfect and means I bought something in the past, and this purchase has a present result, likely ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.8k
3 votes
Accepted

Syntax question. Why does this sentence sound awkward when I move the adverbial phrase?

Adverbs modify verbs. This statement is correct, but misleadingly incomplete with respect to English. Adverbs can modify verbs, but also verb phrases. In English, but not in some other languages, ...
Vegawatcher's user avatar
  • 1,397
3 votes

"Is he not the carpenter's son?" v.s. "Is not he the carpenter's son?"

English is my second language but in my understanding in the first sentence the focus is on him and in the second sentence the focus is on the carpenter's (son) that's why i would answer like that: &...
Vloxxity's user avatar
  • 147
2 votes

Shortened complex sentences or simple sentences with multiple subjects/predicates

These are simple sentences with a single, compound subject (or other element) So "John and Jill" is the subject in the first sentence. That is one subject (not two) but it is compound. &...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
2 votes

He composed me a piece of music vs he composed a piece of music for me

The form “composed him a ....” is practically never used, and does not sound idiomatic to me. When I tried to search on Google Ngrams, none of, “Bach composed him,” “Mozart composed him,” or “...
Davislor's user avatar
  • 8,474
2 votes
Accepted

Give something to somebody vs Give somebody something

OP's example #2 is a ditransitive usage - it's got two objects with no prepositions. The keys (the thing given) are the direct object, and Sarah (the receiver) is the indirect object. Note that with ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
2 votes

I never thought there was OR was there?

Both sentences sound like somebody speaking and thinking as they speak. The first sentence needs least change; you could change "which to "and" or "but", or even leave it out ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 7,057
2 votes
Accepted

He composed me a piece of music vs he composed a piece of music for me

The first is wrong. To compose takes only one object - a direct object. "Me" cannot be another object. The second is correct. There is a direct object - "a piece of music" and &...
user81561's user avatar
  • 2,579
2 votes

Are the words in "The 40th-anniversary restoration of the concert film" really in the right order? Is this semantical?

They're not restoring the 40th anniversary, they're restoring the concert film, 40 years on. This, therefore, makes perfect sense. The restoration of a 40-year-old film is the '40th-anniversary ...
DoneWithThis.'s user avatar
2 votes

Part of speech of 'thanks'

It looks like a noun because it has a plural-like -S on the end. And there is a noun thanks in English, as seen in the example below: Give our thanks to Brenda, when you see her. However, in the ...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible