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The phrase "along came" means something or someone passed by the observer, but it is often used in a figurative sense to talk about something that comes to pass in history. For example: Along came calculus. Meaning at some point in history, calculus came into existence. "Come along" is more of an invitation for someone to join you on a trip. This ...


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Most of these suggestions are ungrammatical and even the last one, which is grammatical, is unnatural. As @geoyeo says in their answer, expensive is a adjective, so it must modify a noun. Furthermore, expensive means "high-priced," so it sounds unnatural to say "a more expensive price" since that means "a more high-priced price," which sounds redundant. ...


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Formally, the last statement is grammatically correct, as expensive is an adjective, therefore a noun would have to come after. However, many phrase the term differently, some examples are in the other answers. Hope this helps!


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I feel like it should be formulated this way; "I am selling it at a higher rate compared to the others". I hope this helps!


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Most likely, there wouldn't be any perceived difference between the two sentences. However, there is a subtle difference in interpretation that could be made: I just want to say X . . . This means that the only thing you want to do is say X. You don't want to run, jump, watch TV, or have dinner. All you want to do is say X. I want to just ...


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I don't know if they are wrong, but I certainly have not heard them before. For number 3, if you are asking the question directly to a group of people in front of you, you could always ask this way: Whose child is this? For number 1, you could ask the following: What color would you like your car to be? >What is your preferred color for ...


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TL;DR: "Sub-subcategory" is not a thing. In both language and taxonomy, there is no special word for the subcategory of another subcategory. There are several reasons for this. For one, subcategory is a class of things, not a thing, itself. The prefix "sub-" indicates that all of the things in this class also belong to another, broader class of things. It ...


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1) I did not it No, this expression is not generally used. 2) I did not do it Number 2 is correct English 3) Not I did it (but he). Number 3 is not generally used. The distinction that you want to make between 1, 2 and 3 are made by stress I didn't do that. (But he did) I didn't do that. (But I did this) Similarly, the question forms could ...


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The normal order for non-subject questions in English is for the subject to follow the first word (only) of the verb phrase. In most cases, that first word is an auxiliary, eg (auxiliary in italics; subject in bold): What does that mean? How should I do it? Who have you already talked to? So you example should normally read What will our ...


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The first one follows the list of "Pronoun linking verb adjective noun" while the second follows "Pronoun adjective noun linking verb" which makes little sense. The first "Which is the best reason" follows smoothly because "which" is connected by the "is" to the noun and subject of the clause, "reason", along with its adjective, "best". I agree with ...


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To Zeeman; I agree, hence my question and I like your alternatives. To tchrist; though that was how the question was put to me, I think you will find many examples of "do exercise" (Corpus of Contemporary American English). On that note, when I searched for "which the best reason is" I got zero results so I turned to Stack Exchange.


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The first doesn't sound natural in any way.. The better option could be 'What could be the best reason for people to exercise?' or 'What is the best reason for people to exercise?'


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Both are correct. The only difference is a subtle shift in emphasis (too subtle to worry about, really). We have all experienced is the more "relaxed" form, but grouping we all together might be useful in emphasizing a specific group (akin to "all twelve of us have experienced hardship" as opposed to "all people have experienced hardship"). This isn't a rule,...


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Both of the original poster's suggested corrections are grammatically and semantically correct. #2 ("small in size") is an idiomatic expression, but is not usually used to describe clothes. #1 is not an idiomatic expression. The following options are natural in American English: 3) Your clothes are size "Small". 4) Your clothes are all Smalls. ...


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I would suggest simply saying what you stated that you mean: "...was selected from (in order of priority): the Mus Musculus species sera (cells or tissues), Rattus norvegicus species, and human sera.


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In the sentence We went to the movies Yesterday Yesterday serves as an adverb, it describes when "We went" In the sentence Yesterday as a good day Yesterday is the subject of the sentence.


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Both "What that movie about is?" and "Tell me what that movie about is" are ungrammatical. "About" is the complement of "is", and must follow it. You appear to be thinking of inversion: in questions, the subject (not the complement) usually follows the verb (or the auxiliary if there is one). In embedded questions, this does not happen. So That ...


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Your sentences have more problems than the word order. However, concentrating on the good location for "price": in that sentence, the word "price" need not be used. It is not OK to use "price" and "cheaper" together. Why? Because: products are cheap(er) prices are low(er) and not: products are low(er) prices are cheap(er) Two ways to write that ...


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