Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now

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I liked it very much at school yesterday. Yesterday I liked it very much at school. I liked it yesterday very much at school At school I liked it very much yesterday. I think all the above sentences are correct and it is a matter of choice. He came early to school. He came to school late. He came late to school. He came to ...


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All of the following are perfectly idiomatic: I enjoyed school today very much. I really enjoyed school today. I enjoyed school a lot today. I really enjoyed today's lessons. The word order isn't strictly dictated by a rule about where the "time", or the superlative goes. It depends on the idiomatic usage of different words and phrases, ...


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They're both correct and perfectly ordinary English. English allows a lot of flexibility in the placement of prepositional phrases and adverbs in general. Here are some variations, which are also grammatical: Yesterday, we met each other by chance in the subway. Yesterday in the subway, we met each other by chance. In the subway yesterday, we ...


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I think yesterday is an adverb and in the subway and by chance are prepositional phrases acting as adverbials. I do not think there is no specific rule to arrange them in a sentence but we have to see that the construction is not clumsy. We met each other in the subway by chance yesterday. We met each other bychance in the subway yesterday. ...


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Only a small difference. Consider using a simpler adjective and noun "red" and "cat". Are both [of them] red cats? This asks both about the colour and the species. The answer could be "No, they are red dogs" or "No, they are black cats". (or "Yes, they are") Are both cats red? This assumes they are cats, and asks only about the colour. The answer ...


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Yes, both are grammatical. We are dealing with ellipsis. Both examples are viable examples can be made more compact without loss of sense by Both examples are viable or by Both are viable examples The first form of ellipsis is turned into a question Are both examples viable? The second form is turned into a question Are both viable ...


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I think the structure is Subject +verb+object+ adjective as objective complement. I found four injured men alive it is similar to the structure He painted the house green The Jury found him guilty


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Option 1: When will the contract be awarded? is the correct order. When asking a question like this, the word "will" will almost always come after who, what, where, when, why, or how (if the word "will" is in the sentence). For example, you would say, "Where will the event take place", "Who will host the meeting today?", "What will we be doing later?", "Why ...


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"On the item page, still there are two different types of models" is valid, but archaic, so many people would say it was bad grammar. "On the item page, there are still two different types of models" is more normal in a modern context.


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They are both perfectly fine. However, I would prefer the first variant, because today sits close to the word it clarifies, do. If today sits next to English, the listener must do an extra (slight) effort to match today with do. Additionally, in the second sentence, I would add some commas: B. What did you do, in order to improve your English, today?


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