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1

"I put it on you" is the only possible one of your three versions, though it would be more natural to say "I put your coat on for you" or "I help you into your coat". We could say "Here's another blanket. Shall I put it over you?" "No-one can take it from you." Is that the sort of thing you wanted?


1

To avoid unclear word combinations like '(their system) which I struggled with' or 'struggled with myself', I'd suggest to attach (or to write as a separate sentence) the words in this order: ... and, on occasion, I honestly struggled with that myself.


0

"in (with) such.........as to" I have some examples of this construction The man was laughing with such gusto as to frighten the child The gift was given in such jest as to amuse the crowd Not brilliant examples, but you get the idea.... (The man laughed so heartily that he frightened the child; the gift was given in such a funny way that it ...


1

"What time do you work until?" would be the most idiomatic of the three; the third option wouldn't be said as it sounds a little ambiguous and could probably be interpreted in a few different ways. I (British) would usually say this as: What time do you finish work? What time do you work till? (more colloquial)


0

Comma after discrimination and after prescription but note that this is still wordy and does not flow as a sentence. Try Supporting guidance on 'Fair trading requirements' advises that discrimination is forbidden in regard to the costs of the goods and services, against those owners who wish to obtain a written prescription.


1

As pointed out in the comments, the original word that felt out of place was "concerned." I think it could still be used with a slight adjustment to place emphasis on "concerned" instead of "use." The phrasing of "although working" was also noted to be a bit ambiguous. It can be left off since it's not really critical to the preference expressed in the ...


0

By my opinion grammatically both of the questions are right. But the meaning can be slightly different from each other (need context). First question like a real question to somebody who might know about. Second question more like a rhetorical question about sentence that is needed to view with doubt. But this is really small difference that can disappear by ...


6

"Grand theft" was historically used in the U.S. legal system (or at least in popular depictions of it) to denote theft of goods valued more than a certain amount (typically $1,000, which was consequentially called "one grand"), with theft of lesser valued goods considered "petty theft". "Grand theft auto" is therefore the theft of an automobile worth more ...


1

None of the answers so far are right. "Fish began to grow teeth and become like the fish of today" is grammatically correct. There are two right answers depending on how you analyze it. The word 'and' may be joining two predicates, both belonging to the subject "fish" and both in the simple past tense: Fish began to grow teeth and became like the fish of ...


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