124

It's a children's joke, nothing more. It's certainly not something one would encounter in everyday conversation. The number pattern 7, 8, 9 sounds identical to seven ate nine in spoken form. A similar joke is depicted here:


62

Heh, because "Seven Ate Nine (7, '8,' 9)." Ate = Eight.


57

The first one is a play on the phrase 'I'm going bananas' to mean going a bit crazy. (Sounds a bit like a Tim Vine one-liner this). It is meant to make you think they are going crazy when you read the first three words, but then when you read the rest, you realise you misunderstood (due to the lack of punctuation) and that the person is actually saying to ...


42

"I'm going bananas" is what I tell my bananas before I leave the house. is a "garden-path sentence" . The Wikipedia article defines this as: a grammatically correct sentence that starts in such a way that a reader's most likely interpretation will be incorrect; the reader is lured into a parse that turns out to be a dead end or yields a clearly ...


33

Yes: To "bail out" is to abandon a crashing aircraft by jumping out and using your parachute to descend to the ground. Hence the colloquialism "to bail" is to leave a situation urgently. So in the joke, Batman is "bailing" from church. We presume the church is a Christian one. The other meaning that makes it a pun is that the actor Christian Bale played ...


20

The story refers to this cake. Source: Sad Trump cake is the perfect meme to end his campaign un-oven → uneven frosty - unfriendly or cold frosting - a sweet mixture, cooked or uncooked, for coating or filling cakes, cookies and the like; icing. bread and butter - Fig. someone's basic income; someone's livelihood—the source of one's food (Getting a) ...


10

In one of the comments from the link provided, you'd see, "acute tea pie". So, it isn't necessarily a cup of coffee. A cup of tea, it is. Hence, 'A cutie pie'.


10

This is my opinion. How do I see the dialogue from the legendary actor. ‘Whatever doesn’t kill you, makes you . . . stranger,’ the old proverb is actually derived from Nietzsche -‘Whatever doesn’t kill you makes you stronger’. I think Ledger takes it as a kind of pun. The Joker likes to tell stories about how he got the scars and how did he suffer in ...


10

"I'm going (= becoming) bananas!" (= crazy). "I'm going (= go out somewhere), bananas" (the fruit) is what I tell my bananas (the fruit) before I leave the house I am speaking to the fruit as if they were sentient and could understand me, which in turn makes me look and sound quite bananas (crazy, loony etc.). to go bananas (slang) 1. To become ...


9

To add to Mike's excellent answer, the first time I was introduced to this joke was in a lesson about homophones. As as child this silly joke was a perfect example, and much easier to understand then something like "Did the two of you go to the park too?" Homophones are words that sound the same but are spelled and mean different things. For example ate (...


8

Pun? It would be the most common way to describe it - though there could be a more accurate term.


7

Yes, the hire/higher homophone is the basis of the play on words. Is it a bad joke? Probably! Do jokes need to follow exact grammar? Absolutely not! It's only a joke, if a somewhat corny one. It's a bit childish. And in fact, it is the kind of thing we might expect to hear from a child. Edit: Since you are looking for some English "lore" then I wouldn'...


5

The grandmother just lambasted her son's inherent character for causing her to miss spending time with her grandson. She then ironically demonstrates, with equal insensitivity and haughtiness, that she cannot spend time with her grandson. In this case, her excuse for not going to Disneyland is because "she doesn't do Anaheim" (the city in which the theme ...


4

It's a play on words. In snow, we often use stud tires (or studded tires) - tires with small metal studs embedded in them for extra traction. Stud is also a slang term for a sexually attractive man. So the play on words goes: In the snow we put studs on our tires : I am going to put him on my tires :: He is a stud.


4

Yes, you made a pun. A pun is a form of word-play in which a word or phrase is used simultaneously for two of its meanings, or similar-sounding or similar-looking words are exploited for a double meaning. Both meanings make sense, at least somewhat, in the same sentence. In your pun, your friends used the word sweet to mean having a pleasant and kind ...


4

I would say that, as a "twisted" person himself, his view of the world is that anything that harms, but does not kill, warps and corrupts your mind or body until you might as well be dead. The original phrase ("...makes you stronger.") implies that people get better from being injured. This means the opposite, people change for the worse from injury. They ...


4

Turndown service is a real service. In the hospitality industry, 'turndown service' refers to the practice of staff entering a guest's room and "turning down" the bed linen of the bed in the room, preparing the bed for use. A stereotype of the hospitality industry is that when staff come into your room, they invariably misplace your belongings (phone charger ...


4

Yes, "book of faces" or "book of photos of faces." Most questions about the meaning of brand name words don't have a definite answer. Brand names are invented words, so they could mean anything. In the case of Facebook, however, there is an answer. A "facebook" was originally something like a "yearbook" for new students -- an internally published, printed ...


3

"From mingle to single" and "from single to mingle" are playful expressions, a kind of word-play. The grammar is incorrect but people forgive it and play along because of the rhyme and because of the nice contrast between the meanings of "mingle" and "single". The words The primary sense of single is "just one" or "alone". Socially, a "single" person is ...


3

I tell the bananas: I'm going, bananas. I'm going, Lucy. [leaving] idiom: to go bananas,to go nuts, to go crazy


3

Them is a colloquial way of saying those, such as here There's gold in them thar hills. and usually, what them refers to has already been mentioned. It's not just a synonym though, it might be a way to express mockery or disbelief in something rumoured: Let's see them aliens. So in this case it is loaded and says rather more than "those".


2

Huh, I think other answers may be over-analyzing this. Yes, it's an obvious play on the classic "... makes you stronger". So the Joker is a strange person who exults in his own strangeness, so he deliberately mangles the quote. Any deeper analysis than that seems to me to be in the "well, maybe, but I doubt the scriptwriter was really thinking that deeply" ...


2

It's not an idiom or common expression. It's a case of creative freedom by the author. He's making a joke. He writes Warning: More GIFs than the peanut butter aisle. Yes, I pronounce it “Jiff”. Go away. Jif is a brand of peanut butter. So he's saying that he has a lot of gifs by saying that he has more Jif than the peanut butter aisle. The peanut ...


2

In simple terms, someone who thought he knew how to speak better English, "corrected" a statement that did not need correcting, thereby offering an "Incorrect correction".


2

Pua, the pig, is one of Moana's side-kicks, with comedic behavior you might find in a puppy-dog. When Tala sees the damage to the boat, the boat that Moana was not supposed to take beyond the reef, Tala advises Moana to blame the pet pig, so that Moana will not get in trouble for disobeying and for ruining the boat. She says, "Whatever happened..." (...


2

Translations of movie titles is an inexact science. Consider the translations into Russian Silver Linings Playbook => My Boyfriend is a Psycho No Strings Attached => More than Just Sex He's Not That Into You => A Promise Does Not a Marriage Make Other examples are here. My guess is the translation used in your example was meant to have a double ...


2

Its a joke, a pun based on the fact that C (the programming language) and "sea" sound the same. There is going to be a conference C++ on Sea, in a coastal town (some coastal towns have the suffix -on-sea, eg Southend-on-sea). The pun is then continued, as "on the sea" means in a boat; C++ has classes but C does not. So if you were programming in C++, in ...


2

A visceral betrayal is one you feel in your guts. However, I can't tell why the character says that here. In teenager talk: a betrayal that is a gut punch. viscus, Latin for viscera, from which the adjective visceral comes. Viscera: the internal organs in the main cavities of the body, especially those in the abdomen, e.g., the intestines. [usual ...


2

I imagine the meaning is essentially: Love me, do. As in "do it", similar to: "Shall I pour us a drink?" "Yes, please do." So, essentially, through the word "do", you're reiterating the request for someone to love you for emphasis. This kind of "do this, do" phrasing, specifically, is not so common these days, but was more common at the time ...


1

As @shin said, chickens peck, so that’s where the wordplay comes in: “Pecking” means something like poking around with one’s beak in order to eat food. “Impeccable” means “perfect”/“flawless”. So you’re basically saying that the person you’re talking to is perfect, or if they interpret it literally, like a perfect chicken. I would assume that the person on ...


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