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2 votes

Which verb is used for the voluntary termination of degree-awarding powers?

We could consider relinquish: The university relinquishes its degree-awarding powers as a result of discontinuing the field of study. VERB If you relinquish something such as power or control, you ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
2 votes

Is it natural to say "you should've done the math exercise smartly"?

What you have found is a "shortcut". Or a "quick" way to do the problem. You might recommend that she should "work smarter, not harder" But that is clichéd. As usual, ...
James K's user avatar
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2 votes

Is it natural to say "you should've done the math exercise smartly"?

Sorry, but no. "Smart" can mean "intelligent", but "smartly" means "stylishly", like, "Sally was very smartly dressed". Or it can mean "promptly&...
Jay's user avatar
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1 vote

Which verb is used for the voluntary termination of degree-awarding powers?

Granting the unclarity that @JamesK mentions about whether the university’s action can later be reversed, I suggest shelves. It’s somewhat informal, but semantically (and based on the obvious ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote

Which verb is used for the voluntary termination of degree-awarding powers?

It seems that the university isn't losing or terminating any "power". It still has the power to offer degrees. All that is happening is that it is discontinuing a course, or a field of study....
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
1 vote

Do you say "don't play with fire" to a person who is playing with something that might get him dirty?

I have heard the phrase you're playing with fire used to mean "If you keep doing what you're doing, and what I've warned you may happen does indeed happen, you're going to be in big trouble. Don'...
TimR's user avatar
  • 128k

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