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No - mumbling refers to speech which is inarticulate, not inaudible. Speaking without sufficient volume is called whispering. Forming speech patterns with your lips without any sound at all is called mouthing. The vocal sounds made by very young children before they can speak is usually called "babbling" in informal settings, or "tunefully vocalising" by ...


2

English speakers do not tend to say "I am hurt" as a response to physical pain. "I am hurt" tends to refer to emotional hurt, ie hurt feelings. A more idiomatic way to express that you have been hurt, certainly in British English, would be "I hurt myself", or to specifically name the body part you hurt, for example, "I hurt my hand". However, all of your ...


1

Unwrappable is a terrible word, like irregardless or inflammable. Avoid it. Something that can be unwrapped has a wrapper and has been wrapped at some point in the past. So you can say it is wrapped. If something has been wrapped and the wrapper can't be removed, it's sealed. A wrapper is a cover, and something that doesn't have a cover is uncovered,...


1

"Unwrapping" is the process of removing the wrapping. There is no such word as "un-unwrappable", although I suppose it could be used in a humorous way. English speakers would recognise the intended meaning even though it is not a real word. If you are seriously looking for a word for something that is not meant to be unwrapped, I would suggest "sealed", or "...


1

I stand corrected. Apparently, some Americans do indeed coax babies... ...but Brits don't... The reason coaxing doesn't work for me (as a Brit, obviously) with crying babies is that it strongly implies getting a cautious, reluctant party to do something they're not really willing to do. So you might quite reasonably coax the baby to eat, but that ...


1

"Bodies of water" is the collective term that includes oceans, seas, lakes, and possibly smaller pools of water too, such as ponds or wetlands. However, it might be considered a little formal by some for your context. From a non-language point of view though, not all bodies of water are suitable for wild swimming. I have taken a cursory look at a couple of ...


1

He's just 2 and, therefore, you don't use an offensive word. Said that bottom or back is okay. He's just 2. Let's [do something]... works in most of the cases. It's a way of telling babies that we'll do...' or 'let's do...' because you are assisting them. So, all your expressions - "Johny, let's [do something]..." are widely accepted. Or more ...


1

There's no problem in using bootleg wars. Vannie Higgins was a mobster and a prominent bootlegger. The page on Wikipedia has the whole section under the title - Manhattan bootleg wars Another possibility is bootleggers wars, but you may need an apostrophe "bootleggers' wars" A google book says: St Louis was wide open to the bootleggers' wars


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