New answers tagged

1

You should use "tear" not "rip". Your expressions are unconversational and don't sound like a parent talking to a child, but not actually incorrect. If you are making a video to show the child you might say: Fold the paper in half lengthways, then carefully tear along the fold. The word "carefully" includes a lot that the ...


1

I would describe "breaking the fourth wall" as the fictional world showing awareness of the audience (and/or that it itself is a fiction), for example by having a character address the audience. Other related techniques that come to mind include: cameo appearances by people that don't particularly make sense in the fictional world, such as the ...


1

There is always that old favorite: tweaking. to make small adjustments to something, usually a machine, but editors and so forth do say and write to tweak a text, or article, etc.


1

We don't have a phrase for the holes, but we do have a phrase for the light: Dappled light refers to that spotted light which typically comes through gaps in a tree canopy. "Dappled" means covered in spots, and is often also used for horses and ponies. A word with similar meaning is "mottled light".


2

I don't know of a single word for this idea. Nor do I know a standard phrase. English speakers trying to express this idea just describe it. "The sky visible between the trees", "the sky seen through the forest", etc. We get a lot of questions on here about "what is a single word meaning ..." Maybe other languages often have ...


3

Beef up is an option: to make something stronger or more effective, esp. by adding more support — Cambridge For example: What Your State Is Doing To Beef Up Civics Education It's colorful albeit slightly informal.


1

There are lots of alternatives, but here are some: I don't have any option other than going there. My only option is to go there. I've got to go, there are no other options. "Restrained" and "constrained" don't mean the same thing - 'restrain' means to prevent from doing something, so that wouldn't really fit your context where you must ...


2

In a general way, you'd say take a cab or a taxi. Legally uber etc are not taxis (in the UK at least) and so on their websites they are careful not to use the word "taxi", but when speaking conversationally you don't need to worry about the legal details. You can also use "uber" in a generic way. Just like you can say "hoover the ...


0

In the UK we queue for things, or queue up for them or join the queue for them. Or we wait our turn. When there is a systems glitch, the administrators often ask the engineers to take a look at it. But they always find themselves [placed] in a queue. Or, slightly different: When there is a systems glitch and the administrators request an engineer to ...


0

Or maybe "dis" to dismiss, to be dismissive, or maybe "ig" to ignore. I heard "ig" occasionally in the 1980s, along with "igged" as the past tense and "igging" as the gerund form.


0

If there were a word you could use in response to someone like 'OK' or 'alright' that had an inherent meaning of disinterest then nobody would use it, otherwise it would confirm they were disinterested. Really, any word can be said in a disinterested, indifferent manner - like the examples you mentioned of "okay", or "alright". The ...


1

"Newsjacking" is when a brand or firm mentions or creates a campaign centred around a major, well-discussed news item. So for your example to work, "his divorce" would have to be a well-discussed news item. And you would have to be a brand or firm. You would say "newsjack his divorce" by analogy with "hijack his aeroplane&...


2

the verb 'foster' comes to mind, especially if there was a lot of work going into it. A more financially-connotated word you might consider would be 'sponsored'. That being said, I think your original usage is also fine.


1

You could say Several people blew the whistle on him. or Several people blew the whistle on his dirty secrets. "Secrets behind him" sounds odd.


1

There are a couple of casual phrases: She's a class act. She's a brick. This one suggests that she is completely dependable. In more formal English, I think you have to say She's completely dependable. Her integrity is unquestionable. There doesn't seem to be a convenient noun. I mentioned "Mensch" in a comment. But this slang is not common ...


-1

For the extremely scrupulous person I like the description "You could take their handshake to the bank and it'd draw interest".


4

You might be looking for a backrest like this: (source: https://www.harley-davidson.com/us/en/shop/Comfort-Stitch-Adjustable-Rider-Backrest-Kit/p/52423-09A)


1

If I tell someone my phone number is 1234 and they write down 1324, I would say they have transposed the two middle digits. 'Swapped' is an informal equivalent you could use in conversation. Transpose (Cambridge Dictionary)


0

I would describe the objects as "(accidentally) swapped". The implication is that the objects have swapped position


1

It makes sense but I think you should treat this as a new word and use some scare quotes. John realised that there was an opportunity to start a "motorbike park", to provide parking for the many bikers that used the area. The scare quotes warn the reader that they should interpret this as a new word, and so understand it from context.


2

Nothing special. Perhaps the "pointer" or "the arrow". We would probably not refer directly to the arrow, but use an expression like "He span the wheel of fortune and it landed on $400"


2

Can you say, "My T-shirt is so tight that my chest sticks out"? Certainly. As you apparently understand, "sticks out" does not necessarily mean "pokes through the covering". This sentence would make more sense coming from a woman, but a man might say it if he has a prominent chest.


2

Looking through the Glossary of botanical terms, I found the term abscission The normal separation of flowers, fruit, and leaves from plants. which describes the process you're referring to quite accurately.


1

If you are asking about protecting the child, and not about English grammar, try If you rock your horse close to the wall you might hurt your foot. ... perhaps accompanied by a visit to the wall and a gentle demonstration of what might happen. Then keep a close eye. If the picture is accurate, "stay on the rug" might be even better.


1

I would describe the surveys/polls as biased and unbiased, respectively Giving results that are not accurate because information has not been collected correctly. When the groups that are sampled are not proportional to their numbers in the population, the results of the survey/poll are going to be biased by that sampling. Of course, this assumes that the ...


1

You may be thinking of "Embossing", "Beading", "Sequin", "Spangle", or something similar? This link guides one through the many possible ways of accessorizing fabrics. I would think this is an example of "Spangle", as it seems to involve small shiny pieces of metal or plastic used for decorating clothes, but ...


2

The metallic objects attached to the mask in the picture are studs.


1

'Debris' or obstacles(more figurative) would work Dredging is clearing a channel for ships. You're correct a drudge is an old fashioned word for a menial worker. Maybe you're thinking of 'sludge'? Which would be a little off.


1

This is how I've been writing it in my WIP thus far. They had not been underway long before the walkie-talkie in Mason’s lap started squawking again. Pssssaaat crnkllsht psssshtt… “…almost at the…” psssssshhat. Mason frowned and picked up the radio. “Say that again, I’m getting a lot of static here.” Pzzzaat, pssssat… “… about to hit the door! Slow…” …...


1

The everyday word for this is a tongue twister. Depending on the type of similar sounds used, it might more technically be called alliteration.


2

Marionette controller. The term used for the device used to control a marionette puppet (usually much more complex than just a simple cross) is, perhaps unsurprisingly, called a "marionette controller". I found this through a quick Google search for "marionette puppet parts" which turned up images displaying the names for different ...


1

The cross in the picture is the control bar, and is used primarily with the kind of puppet in the picture, called a marionette Marionettes, or "string puppets", are suspended and controlled by a number of strings, plus sometimes a central rod attached to a control bar held from above by the puppeteer. As far as I'm aware, the strings are just ...


1

Try claustrophobic The American Heritage Dictionary defines it as Uncomfortably closed or hemmed in.


3

I think panorama fits nicely An unobstructed or complete view of an area in every direction. The example at the bottom of the linked definition even applies directly to your case We admired the breathtaking panorama from the top of the mountain.


-1

I was actually bitten by a cat who was not ready to be picked up. It was a rescue. It bit my hand and it scratched it. My hand blew up like a pumpkin and I was on antibiotics for two weeks. It was not the cat's fault, it was mine. Stupid human. :) The cat was fending me off. Scratching and biting is all they can do to fend off a threat.


3

Yes, they are indicative of the matter in your question. 1 and 2 have the same meaning, with more indication of doing a poor job because of incompetence. 3 is similar, with more indication of doing a poor job to save time or money. That are all very similar, though.


4

In your examples 1 and 2, we would normally omit the "up" (and, thanks @Lambie, "bungle" should take a more specific argument): The builders really botched this room. The builders really bungled the job on this room. In British English at least, these mean pretty much the same thing, and it's not what you're looking for. It means they ...


0

I think the word you want is "swipe" to hit or try to hit something, especially with a sideways movement: (Cambridge) The cat swiped at my hand when I bent down to pet it. or as a noun Don't come too close, it may take a swipe at you!


4

(At least to me as a native American English speaker...) "Under my chin" is more natural. "In my neck" sounds like it was somehow inside the neck itself (that is, under the skin), and doesn't immediately conjure the image of how you were holding it in the same way that "under my chin" does. "Against my neck" would ...


4

The undriven wheels are called casters. They are mounted on pivots which allow them to rotate around their vertical axes. The wheels themselves contain bearings.


-1

Overwhelming. Per Merriam Webster: tending or serving to overwhelm overwhelming force overwhelming evidence


1

The definition of "floated" that applies is To offer for consideration; suggest: floated my idea to the committee. I don't know the exact nuance of the Hungarian, but I assume you want to express that you made a proposal to see how someone might react to it instead of making a firm proposal to ask someone to decide yes or no. You could use "...


1

You could use "raised the idea" or "raised the prospect." But "floated the idea" is not slang, nor would I classify it as very informal.


1

You may be looking for either the term “progress report” or “report card”. Wikipedia describes report cards (which seem to be called just reports in British English): In most places, the report card is issued by the school to the student or the student's parents once to four times yearly. A typical report card uses a grading scale to determine the quality ...


2

The thing that holds the drill is called the chuck. Wikipedia drill chuck


1

A motor is: a rotating machine that transforms electrical energy into mechanical energy — MW It's a very widely understood word, and also the term used by professionals. Motors are found in a lot of other machines, such as cars. Here's a drill-related example of the word: Cordless drill motors are based off one of the earliest designs for motors; that is ...


2

It is the motor that causes the rotation, and it is bearings that support the part that will rotate. In general, motors make things move, while bearings are surfaces where parts "bear" on each other (that is, they slide over each other. Bearings are designed to allow that sliding without much wear, and to confine the movement.


5

This category, artisan(e) du bâtiment, while readily understandable as a concept to British speakers, does not seem to have one single word in English that distinguishes practitioners from chefs, model makers, and pilots, and I would add that lately I have had very good painting & decorating, and carpentry, done by women, and neither of these would like ...


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