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This is called Full Time Equivalent (FTE): The calculation of full-time equivalent (FTE) is an employee's scheduled hours divided by the employer's hours for a full-time workweek. When an employer has a 40-hour workweek, employees who are scheduled to work 40 hours per week are 1.0 FTEs. Employees scheduled to work 20 hours per week are 0.5 FTEs. — How do I ...


1

I don't think there is a standardized term for exactly what you are looking for. But you could use variations instead. For example: Contractual Status Contractual Category Employee Category Shift Type Working Hours etc.


0

I think these words are close enough : fastidious - conservative


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When stitching 'suturing' a wound, the thread is usually carried through itself in a knot, each of these is one stitch.


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Almost right, but each time the thread goes between the two pieces of fabric or skin that we wish to join, it's a stitch. We use the number of stitches as an indicator of the severity of the wound. To describe your photograph, you would say He had to have 13 stitches in his head.


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The shorter alternative to “less than or equal to” is “not greater than”. This isn’t as common in everyday speech as the former, but it’s used plenty in law, engineering or other technical contexts that value accuracy and brevity over readability to laymen.


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Instead of: How many girls whose ages are less than or equal to 18 do you have? You could say: How many girls do you have who are aged 18 or under? or How many girls do you have who are under 19 years of age?


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The answer is Eon. Eon often refers to a span of one billion years.


2

Something smells burning in the kitchen is not idiomatic in American English. The problem is that "smell" is not just a linking verb. It is also a transitive verb. I smell smoke in the kitchen does not mean that my odor changes when I enter the kitchen. As Samuel Johnson once said when a lady told him that he smelled, "No, madame, you smell;...


1

"Buck-toothed" would be quite insulting if used to describe somebody. It also specifically means that the teeth are angled forwards, protruding. Another term for this is an overbite (eg "she has an overbite"). The people in the photographs don't look like their teeth are angled forwards - they simply have prominent (not protruding) teeth. ...


1

You could ask them not to renege on their promise. Merriam Webster - renege renege - verb re·​nege | \ ri-ˈneg also -ˈnāg, -ˈnig; rē- reneged; reneging Definition of renege intransitive verb 1 : to go back on a promise or commitment 2 : revoke 3 obsolete : to make a denial Sample sentences: They had promised to pay her tuition but later reneged. my so-...


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I've often heard and used the term "hermit"; the intended meaning is the same as "living under a rock". Borrowing from the "living under a rock" answer, you'd phrase it like: "You've never heard of instagram? Are you some kind of hermit?" "Hermit"'s original meaning is rather more specific (it's a person who ...


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You've answered your own question: put the slide into the platform


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In normal conversation it might be: Look up under the table. Can you see the note? This gives a context to find the note. Just saying: Look under the table. Leaves the person looking at the floor and table legs. The use of from in your original phrase is not necessary.


2

Not "we hate each other". Hate just suggests that one strongly dislikes another. You can hate someone, but still argue with them face to face, for example. One expression is (to be) not on speaking terms, or we are not on speaking terms: not be on speaking terms If you are not on speaking terms with someone, you refuse to speak to them because you ...


4

You've actually used the word I would probably pick as a native speaker, and which seems to be common: Has the actor learnt his lines yet? Part would work more generally if you meant more than just the words they are to say.


1

In this case, I think your sentence is ok without the parenthetical clarification. Simply: In 2000, I joined the newly opened university XYZ. In more complex cases, you could clarify with a dependent clause: In 2000, I joined the university XYZ, which had just received a 1st place ranking by AAA Reports. (Note if you replace "had" with "...


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For the person receiving the promise, you can "enforce" the promise. It's more a legal usage than a common usage and it can be a bit slippery because it sounds almost like you will use physical force, but actually it could be anything (like not letting your kid watch TV because they didn't take out the trash like they promised). From Google: "...


3

Then is your saviour here. In 2000, I joined the then newly opened university XYZ. then - at that time; at the time in question. It points to a specific time/event in the past. More examples: I was still in school then when the attacks happened. The play rules were different then.


6

One can also honor (or perhaps honour) a promise, as in "She asked him to honor his promise." That's not to say there's a single word equivalent for "ask to honor a promise" or even "ask to honor". Some googly stats: +"Keep your promise" 1.04m +"Keep his promise" 2.34m +"Honor your promise" ...


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One can say "hold them to their promise".


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You could say "Are you going to fulfil your promise?" From Collins Dictionary: If you fulfil something such as a promise, dream, or hope, you do what you said or hoped you would do. Example: Politicians will try very hard to fulfil the promises that they make.


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Here are some words that could work: gunfire firing sniping flak bombardment fusillade volley barrage rifle fire salvo cannonade I would probably fill it in with: "the fire or firing" which, at least for me, should be the best choice. But your pick is just as correct as mine.


0

No, this would not be idiomatic for North American English speakers, despite the use of "channels" in certain formal and technical contexts. Idomatic options would include "I've got some avenues I'm going to explore", or, more plainly, "there are some people I'm going to talk to about it".


20

One keeps a promise. That is what you would request of a promiser. You promised you would help me move. I'm asking that you keep that promise.


1

For the older style of television (the big one), I usually use the colloquialism "box TX". I also use CRT to describe the type of image projection device a TV uses, but I suppose "CRT TV" and "old-style television" work. For the modern TV, I use the term "flat-screen TV". Since there are different types of display ...


0

For a foot, we are talking about the toes and the ankle. The verbs are different for those. You can flex your whole foot, which involves moving the ankle, without moving your toes. You wiggle or move or bend your toes and flex your ankle or rotate it. No single verb applies to both.


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Specifically for a face: Molded more specific to expression: grimaced yawned stretched For a foot or arm: Flex is fine The ones you listed, "flex" and "move", are pretty good choices. Check out "tense" and "extend", although they are different. Also... it is unclear exactly what the question is. Are you looking ...


4

No. Do not use "channels" at all here. "Channels" refers to existing, formalized or semi-formalized lines of communication. You might "go through the proper channels" to register a complaint with some local authority, or to send an inter-agency memo. You might go through "back-channels" to circumvent the usual methods (...


0

Curling of the top lip is called 'sneering' and shows contempt. Curling of the bottom lip is usually called a pout and can show unhappiness or dissatisfaction when accompanied with a scowl. From Websters dictionary: Pout: to show displeasure by thrusting out the lips or wearing a sullen expression. Note that some people pout their bottom lip as part of an ...


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I'd use set up: I haven't found anyone yet, but I've set up many channels of communication. In that context, "set up" would mean "establish" - ie. you've established contact with many people and have an open channel of communication with them for further negotiation. It's still a little obtuse, but it's probably the closest one can get ...


9

Besides the already-multiply-answered "put out some feelers" and "spread the word," I'd like to add the idiomatic English-language metaphor of "planting seeds" and waiting to see what germinates: I'm sorry! I haven't yet found anyone, but I have planted some seeds and may have something for you soon. All of these metaphors ...


5

Yes but not in the way you mean The phrase "set channels" is used but not in the way you suggest. The word "set" can be used as an adjective., meaning "fixed" or "conventional". Thus I went through the set channels means I went through the normal channels (or fixed channels).


5

In that context, no, it's not idiomatic English (but might be understood by some people, I understood it without having to think about it, but I'm a rather atypical native English speaker in many respects). You are largely correct about your assessment of the meaning of 'channels' in this context, with the common phrase being 'channels of communication'. ...


11

The metaphor of "channels of communication" is sound, and would probably be understood. The most fundamental problem with your proposed phrase is the choice of verb: although "set" has many meanings, none of them are appropriate here. I think the most common verb for creating metaphorical channels would be that we have "opened" ...


5

The answer is "NO". (The given sentence sounds like a textbook example of "broken English" or "foreign English".)


1

An external examiner in the UK context is someone appointed to oversee the examination process, to keep standards uniform across the country. Such a person might include in their duties setting a paper, checking papers set by others, moderating the marks of others and conducting oral examinations of some or all students. If that is all or some of what you do ...


34

This usage of channel could roughly be a literal channel (and unclear), or figurative, as in a means of communication (M-W). The idea seems right, but it's not idiomatic. Perhaps, I've gone through the proper channels, but it's not clear what that would be (an agency? social media?). Anyway, if you want to express that you told people, you could use simple ...


7

The word "channel" in this context is fine. We use "channel" in this figurative way quite often, for example "channels of communication". Just a literal channel connects one thing to another, a channel can refer to any connection between two parties. In your specific example, there may be various different ways to sell a car - ...


1

You could use the word "unstable", which doesn't necessarily suggest that it changes quickly, but it does mean something could change at any time. Otherwise, I can't think of a single, widely-used adjective to describe something that changes rapidly. Those are two different qualities. You might as well ask for a single adjective that describes ...


1

A think a basic term for this is "exam proctor" (AmE). Proctor [...] In the United States and some other countries, the word "proctor" is frequently used to describe someone who oversees an examination (i.e. a supervisor or invigilator) or dormitory. Examination supervisor In the United States and some other countries, a proctor can be ...


4

Yes, that's correct if you mean to lay it down on the ground or floor, like in your picture. I think it's rare for people to do that to chairs on purpose, so you might get odd looks, no matter how you say it, until you confirm that you do indeed want that result. "Please tip the chair over and lay it down" or "please lay the chair down on its ...


1

It isn't idiomatic to say "eat seriously". We would say "eat sensibly" or "could you eat sensibly". We could also say "stop playing with your food".


1

The expression you’re looking for is “(just) as much a [noun] as”: I am (just) as much a parent as you (are). But since you’re parenting the same kids: I am (just) as much their parent as you (are). The “just” isn’t required, but it adds a sense of indignation, such as during an argument.


0

You can say they've committed a gaffe or a faux pas (from French).


1

Either is fine; the first one sounds a little better as there is something slightly unusual about using end in this way. It's also common to use zip with up, even if it's not being zipped in an upward direction, so you could also say zip it all the way up.


3

From the film, The Prestige Every great magic trick consists of three parts or acts. The first part is called "The Pledge". The magician shows you something ordinary: a deck of cards, a bird or a man. He shows you this object. Perhaps he asks you to inspect it to see if it is indeed real, unaltered, normal. But of course...it probably isn't. The ...


2

I don't think there's a single word that you can use to express this idea. A native speaker would likely tell his son, "you have to eat the whole thing" or "you can't just eat the inside of the cookie". A common phrase that parents use when kids aren't treating their food properly is "don't play with your food". It doesn't ...


0

Like putty or painted like a clown like too much foundation or too dark and too much and messy. Dark foundationputty and loud and screaming colors. It looks messy irregular it looks not natural.It is too much of everything.


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Matlab has an operation for that: B = fliplr(A) returns A with its columns flipped in the left-right direction (that is, about a vertical axis). If A is a row vector, then fliplr(A) returns a vector of the same length with the order of its elements reversed. If A is a column vector, then fliplr(A) simply returns A. For multidimensional arrays, fliplr ...


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