New answers tagged

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Until today I would have said your father welched on the deal. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/welch https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/welch The spelling "welshed* is more common (according to Merriam-Webster), but I've always heard it pronounced as if it were spelled "whelched". Merriam-Webster says it is ...


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"Deathday" will not be familiar to most English speakers outside (perhaps) those countries where the practice is common. I see another poster has found "death anniversary" but I would suggest "anniversary of their death"; this is actually fairly common in reference to famous composers, authors, artists, etc., for whom we may ...


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sad sack, a perrenial victim of misfortune


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Another possibility, which is a fairly informal US usage, is *he walked back on his promise".


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English mostly does not like to use adjectives as nouns referring to concrete things such as people or objects. Most of the time when adjectives get used directly as nouns, they are being used either as abstract nouns (usage of ‘fun’ as a noun mostly fits this) or as collective nouns for a group of people or objects that share that quality (for example ‘the ...


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You must consider that adjectives that refer to eyes, noses, and ears most often refer to the physical organ and not to that organ's associated sense. Eyes are the organ but Eyesight or Vision is the sense. Nose is the organ but Sense of Smell is the sense. Ears are the organs but Hearing is the sense. That being said, speakers often do substitute the ...


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I'm surprised no one has said "bailed" yet. He bailed on me.


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The word for a miserable person is a wretch. However it is fairly rare, and has a sense of "someone in rags in Victorian novel". It would have slightly hyperbolic meaning: The wretch lost his wife and his job. It collates as "the poor wretch". Note that "wretch" can also mean "a despicable person"


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unhappy cannot be used as a noun. unfortunate can and sometimes is used, but a noun phrase like "poor man", "poor thing" or "poor soul" is more widely used. This Ngram graph shows that poor man is a clear favourite at the moment.


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Aside from "delicate", these are mostly correct. As a native speaker, I would say "keen" and "sharp" are both adjectives that are used to refer to the acuity of a physical sense. "Clear vision" is an idiom that refers to vision metaphorically, in regards to things like predicting the future or deciding the course of a ...


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There is almost certainly no formal word for something like this. Introvert is a personality type: typically quiet, reserved, and thoughtful. Introverts don't seek out special attention or social engagements. It has little to do with whether someone replies to texts. In formal writing, you would use a phrase such as "A person who does not respond to ...


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I had the same question today and this is all I could find. aporophobia: (rare) A strong antipathy, aversion or hatred toward poverty or poor people.


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No, because introvert is not a formal word, and introverts continue texts all the time. The reason why conversations die is not because one of the two people is an introvert. There are many, many reasons why this happens.


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I'd understand "bridle" but the technical term is halter: a strap or rope placed around the head of a horse or other animal, used for leading or tethering it. (Lexico) The main difference between a bridle and halter is that a bridle is for riding, but a halter is for leading an animal. Bridles usually attach to a "bit" that goes in the ...


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hmm. so many points to make (and it is very dysfunctional not to be able to reply/respond to individual comments) so ... ESL audience? 'don't' in Subject is very bad English ... 'doesn't' pls. yes, i believe that 'barter' was/is meant to be bargaining/exchanging in goods only (not money) eg 1 doz eggs for 2lb tomatoes (it doesn't have to be food) whereas '...


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You may be thinking of cobbles or cobblestones: A naturally rounded stone (usually from rivers, fields or the sea) used for paving and walls. Setts are often popularly called cobbles. They are small stones or pebbles that were traditionally gathered from stream beds and hence had been rounded and smoothed by water. (designing buildings) This Sunwood site ...


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Your father balked at the price. per Dictionary.com: to stop, as at an obstacle, and refuse to proceed or to do something specified (usually followed by at): When applied to horses, the word means to stop in the middle of a path and refuse to go on. For humans, it often means to refuse to participate in a transaction once the full details have been made ...


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I disagree with Maulik V's answer. She mixes with all types of people is a different construction than They are our type, the latter of which (in my experience) almost always refers to some sort of attraction (romantic and the like). The phrase all [different] types of people is like saying all [different] colors of people, but saying she is your color is a ...


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"Sticker shock" describes the phenomenon of looking into buying something, and being surprised about how much it actually costs.


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If you need a single word you could say reconsider (WordHippo) To alter one's opinion about something The episode had made him reconsider, like a great sickness or a bereavement. if a phrase is acceptable, you could say that your dad broke his promise. "To break a promise" means to not do what one said one would definitely do (Merriam-Webster) ...


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He said he has never said that. We might also say, in this case, that he has a "selective memory", as he has conveniently forgotten what his earlier promise was. It would be even more applicable if he said he didn't remember making that promise. Also, if he didn't actually use the word promise, then we could say something similar about you! Try ...


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You could have bought it with $1, but you want to save more, so you ask me :"could I buy this apple with $0.5"? This is called bidding or making a bid. It is usually done in competition with other bidders for the same item, but it doesn't have to be. Also "to make an offer" or simply "to offer". You: How much is that apple? ...


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There are several ways to say that: X went back on his promise/word X reneged on his promise The one I love is: X back-pedalled (on his promise)


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I do not think there is a particular word or common idiom in English for this idea exactly. The closest I can think is "lowball offer" — this works on the buyer's side as you describe. I don't think there is a corresponding term for if the seller starts with a higher-than-really-expected number.* However, there's a fine line here: a lowball offer ...


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dicker to argue with someone, especially about the price of goods: Cambridge on-line


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What you describe is "haggling". The person "makes an offer" of $0.50 (and note that that means 50 cents so you need the zero at the end) In you example the seller "rejects" the offer, but they could have made a "counteroffer" by saying "50 cents is not enough, how about $1.50" The first person could then &...


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Not all adverbs of time can go at the beginning of the sentence in the way you have it. The use of the present tense also influences the choice of the adverb (phrase). "For a few moments there, I was fascinated" sounds more common to my ears. But I guess you can also say For a few seconds/For a few minutes/In passing, I am fascinated. WordHippo ...


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"Personal" and "private" probably don't fit if you share the kitchen with everyone else in the office. But you could call it "the office kitchen". This makes it clear that the kitchen is part of the office and belongs with it. I.e., it shares a roof, and maybe a janitor or cleaner, and is for the use of the people who also have ...


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The idiomatic phrase for this in American English would be "going out of business." For example, this article uses this term a number of times (also "went out of business" in the past tense), and many more examples can be found online. A store might, for example, have a "going-out-of-business sale" to sell off all its assets. ...


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All of your ideas sound good. Some other suggestions: absolutely wrecking demolishing razing cubicles to the ground devastating


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It depends whether you want to emphasize the way in which the follower proceeds, or the fact that he is chasing Kevin. To describe the manner of walking, "strides", "steps", "trots", and "hurries" all could work. To focus on the goal of the movement such words as "follows", "pursues", "chases&...


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As StoneyB pointed out in the comments, the sound that is characterised by a hissing effect is called a 'sibilant'. S, Z, SH, ZH sounds in English are often referred to as 'sibilants'. 'Voiceless alveolar fricative' is the /s/ sound and is a sibilant as Virolino's answer suggests. However, 'voiceless dental non-sibilant fricative' is the TH sound as in 'thin'...


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I would say A file's extension is separated from its name by a dot. or, if the file name includes the extension A file's extension follows the dot in its name. Either would be understood. You could also say A dot is the delimiter that separates a file's name from its extension.


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There is no "European alphabet". Russian and English are both European langauages but they use very different scripts. Any language that uses a different writing system is called having a non-Latin script.


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I call it an archway, or An arch over an entrance or passageway but those can vary a lot in size and materials. If you are speaking very specifically about an arched entry into a garden, I would call it a garden arch or an arbor. Arbor was the first thing I thought of, but in my mind, it is always meant to be covered in some sort of climbing plant, and it’s ...


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You don't "answer a book" in English. Alternatives are: Complete a workbook, having (done/gone through) all the exercises. Do the exercises. Fill in (all) the blanks. Answer (all) the questions. Work through the questions and answer them. etc.


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If we look at the helpful link to Wiktionary provided by @JavaLatte we see 1 A ring- or donut-shaped area or structure. 2 (geometry) The region in a plane between two concentric circles of different radii. 3 (topology) Any topological space homeomorphic to the region in a plane between two concentric circles of different radius. The first two suggest that ...


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Yes, it's a bit of an archaic phrasing, in my opinion still relatively common because of the rhyme "A friend in need is a friend indeed", i.e. "Someone that's a friend to you when you need help is a real friend". "A friend in need" referring to them as the person in need would be more natural these days, and it still causes ...


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Private kitchen is fine, I'd also understand "personal kitchen". I've never heard of such a thing. Perhaps a "garden office (ie a outbuilding used as a office) could have one. So you might need to explain the context. Yes I converted my shed to an office. I can work there and I have a private kitchen with a stove and coffee maker. It's ...


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I'll comment on each, as they're different in sentiment: emerged This implies that a Pope existed, but was somehow hidden or covered. That isn't what you want. came about If something "comes about" it's normally a circumstance. For example: "A crisis came about in 1889..." existed This would work, and is probably closest. But it's ...


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The technical term is adverse drug reaction as outlined in this Wikipedia article Note that side effects can be beneficial although they are often thought of as purely harmful. Clinical trials also report on adverse events which happen to people taking the medication but which is not necessarily caused by it. Only if a causal link is established is it a ...


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I'm from the UK and I do not recognise the term "subject teacher". There shouldn't be any need for you to use a term like this because our schooling works the same way you described - primary school teachers cover all subjects, and secondary school (also referred to as 'high school') teachers specialise in one subject. If someone said "I'm a ...


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Complications... or possibly malaise or debility. Also, I would avoid using absolute statements, such as: ...because of the _________ caused by a new medicine. Because not all new medicines will cause negative effects. Rather, prefer something a bit softer such as: ...because of _________ which may be caused by a new medicine. or ...because of the ...


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I believe that is not called a eye scratch, because that is something different. In the image it looks like a mole. Moles are found both on the skin as well as in the eye. Medical term is Nevus (plural nevi). "You have a scratch on the left of your eye" would literally mean you have a scratch to the left of your eye. If someone wants to describe ...


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Depending on the speaker, it could mean either. In context, and if a native speaker produced it, it would usually be understood as near the eye, not on the eye, i.e. "on the left of" = "to the left of". In everyday speech, 'he's got a scratch next to his right eye' would be perfectly sufficient to describe the scratch you have illustrated-...


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“momentarily”: means either “at any moment now” or “for a moment”


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to call someone means to ask someone to come to you If you can call someone, you ask them to come to you because you need them. You can call them over (it just stresses that they have to cover some distance to get to your location). Wait a minute, I will call him over. Let's call him over... JAAAAMES!! If there is an emergency and you need them urgently, ...


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The problem here is that we are only partially talking about language. We are also talking about complex interactions of emotions and social convention. By starting with ”stalk,” you have created a framework that is necessarily negative. “Stalk” has a meaning that connotes predator and prey. From the standpoint of the prey, there is no positive aspect to ...


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"Promo" is short for "promotional video". These can be informative and they are intended to attract students to the university. An infomercial is something that is shown on TV. If the university has purchased time on (for example) the Home Shopping channel, that would be an infomercial. But that would be unusual. Most infomercials are ...


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Let's get started with doing homework. is okay but doesn't sound idiomatic. Here's what a native might say Let's get started with our homework. Let's get started on our homework. Let's make a start with our homework. Let's start doing our homework. Let's start doing some homework. Let's start our homework. Let's get started with doing some homework. Let's ...


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