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You might say, "I rode a horse with my friend sitting behind me." This sentence would indicate you were most probably the one in control. Alternatively, "My friend and I rode a horse together, and I held the reins." This makes it clear who was in control.


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A "Pillion passenger" is a person sitting behind the driver on a motorbike. You don't say "I rode a pillion passenger". It is possible to say I took a pillion passenger I carried my friend as a pillion passenger I rode with my friend as a pillion passenger You can use the phrase "ride pillion" My friend rode pillion. (but avoid "I rode my friend ...


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"Cut" means that someone used a knife or scissors on it. "Break" suggests that it isn't able to work properly. Split suggests to me that the rope is separated length wise. I cut the rope into 1 metre pieces and tied each length of cut rope to the corners of my tent. (the rope was cut with a knife but it still "works") The rope broke as we tried to ...


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I assume you mean "made the chair fall over". The typical way to say it would be "you knocked down the chair". Depending on the exact action, you could also say "you pushed the chair over". In other words, you describe the boy's actions, not trying to force "fall" into the sentence. Just to confuse you, there is difference between "to fall" and "to fell". ...


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In robotics, position refers to the (x,y,z) coordinates of an object, while pose refers to both the position (3D) and orientation (3D) of an object.


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Jaunt, noun, a usually short journey or excursion undertaken especially for pleasure.


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The first one is. (That's the guy with the baseball cap.) The second one is a frown. The emotion expressed is more anger than disapproval. The third one is a weird face pulled by a model, probably to be comical. The way to think about disapproval vs anger. Disapproval is when you have looked in the back of the fridge and found something has spoiled. ...


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"Contained" is the expression normally used when a virus or infection has been prevented from spreading among the population (ie from person to person). Your suggestion of "confined to..." seems perfectly accurate for something visible, such as a rash, which is only one particular area, but I believe the medical term would be localised. Localized means the ...


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You've kind of answered your own question. It doesn't matter what shape it is - if it is fixed to the bike and folded away by "kicking" it, then it is a kickstand (usually styled as a compound word, rather than as 'kick stand'. A removable stand that goes in the middle of the bike used for maintenance is called a centre stand. This is not "kicked" away, but ...


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Yes, the configuration of the balloon's material that prevents the air from escaping from the balloon does count as a knot.


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Question: For instance, a Spanish person migrates to England and starts writing novels in English. Should we call him "a Spanish-English novel writer"? Answer: No, he is Spanish and writes in English. Spanish, English, French, Chinese, Cape Verdean etc. are nationalities. Writers write in a language. Samuel Becket was Irish and he wrote in French. ...


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The word most often used in this context is mugged (from the verb to mug). It implies stealing from an individual using threat, force or violence. Robbed is an alternative, again indicating theft with force or menaces (from the verb to rob. But while mugged is used only with regard to people, robbed can also be used for institutions such as banks. ...


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All of those phrases have roughly the same potential meaning when referring to pancakes. However we really only use two phrases in this context. flip a pancake turn a pancake 'Turn the pancake over' is also used, but the word 'over' is redundant and is quite often left out. There is no ambiguity without it so it's not necessary. With other objects ...


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There is no specific term in English for that, but you could certainly use : code-name, alias, handle.


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"Flip the pancake" is far and away the most common.


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Perhaps plateau: plateau noun 2 a period or state of little or no growth or decline: to reach a plateau in one's career. verb (used without object), pla·teaued, pla·teau·ing. to reach a state or level of little or no growth or decline, especially to stop increasing or progressing; remain at a stable level of achievement; level off: After a ...


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I would suggest using the word 'strain'. An example would be: I had to strain [my eyes] to be able to read the small print. You could leave out 'my eyes' since very few people would have any difficulty in understanding that you meant your eyes - it is implicit if you leave that out. Hope that helps, Alan.


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The people are lying (down) across the (railway) tracks. The cat is sprawled (rather than lying) across the spindle securing the legs of the stool. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spindle_(furniture)


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If you want to express such an idea, I'd recommend: "Keep (hold of) this (drinking) straw that it won't sink in the box." The reason is that the children of the age from 1 year old to 3 years old are more inclined to percept some verbs in comparison to others. These children have not any knowledge about the majority of idioms, proverbs and sayings which ...


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It is idomatic to talk about pushing something partly or completely into something else. Insert a garlic clove into each hole and push completely into the meat. However, I would note that "do not push the straw completely into the box" is rather adult language to use to a toddler; I would rather say 'don't push it all the way in!". Also those ...


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I don't believe we have a single English word for it. There is a term, but it isn't widely known. It is called dimorphous expression, or "cute aggression" by psychologists and defined as "superficially aggressive behaviour caused by seeing something cute, such as a human baby or young animal". It is not real "aggression", but a primal feeling you want to ...


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When speaking to children, generally idiomatic expressions relating to safety are the exception rather than the norm. I would likely choose something direct: Make sure you stay in the middle! or Stay away from the sides! Though, you could of course say something indirect though not necessarily idiomatic: Watch you don't fall! If you really wanted ...


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As already answered, most people would just say they were "staples": I need to put some more staples in my stapler. It may also be called "a block of staples" as they are stuck together. Another alternative is that they may be referred to as a cartridge. Usually, a "cartridge" is a container with something inside, but the fact that the staples are sort ...


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It is sometimes referred to as "jowls", or, when it is particularly pronounced, a "double-chin". As excessive skin in this area is sometimes a sign of being overweight, having jowls is not usually desirable, but the latter expression "double-chin" is considered particularly insulting. For non-overweight persons, this area of the body is not normally ...


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You're right that 'stamp' for this meaning is almost exclusively for the foot, [ignoring the postage/rubber stamp type of meaning, or even mechanical/engineering to press metal into shape, which are vaguely related.*] You could, with a great deal of force, slam an object on the ground, but this is probably a far larger action than you are imagining; you ...


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No, Tom. One doesn't do that here. I'm keen to try it though and am already compiling a list of songs I think might do the trick.


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The phrase "to put your feet up" doesn't describe this position but your question has actually been asked and answered in a post on English Language & Use: https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/237000/how-would-you-call-sitting-with-your-legs-crossed-but-one-calf-resting-on-the-ot Take a look. It answers your question :)


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Ritual (of an action) arising from convention or habit. "the players gathered for the ritual pregame huddle" (Lexico) I think this word has more of the depth and connotation the asker is looking for rather than the simplistic words like repetition and habit.


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Speaking as an American, I have never before heard the term "skate shoe". I've always heard "roller skates", or "skates" for short. Note that "skates" can also be short for "ice skates". The phrase is almost always used in the plural, like "I put on my roller skates" or "I put on a pair of roller skates". I suppose if you lost one of the pair, you might ...


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As others have said, the general word for a broken piece of glass is "shard". You could also say "fragment", "chip", or "broken piece of glass". Those words could apply to almost anything solid. "A fragment of glass", "a fragment of wood", "a fragment of bone", "a fragment of copper", etc. (You wouldn't use these words for liquids.) Small pieces of wood, ...


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First, I'll mention that there's nothing wrong with the adjectives you've started out with: Difficult, unfriendly, argumentative, uncooperative, etc. One word that comes to mind, though it's a little dated, is: contrary opposite in nature, direction, or meaning. perversely inclined to disagree or to do the opposite of what is expected or ...


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This is a roller skate. The wheels pivot together when the skate is leaned, like a skateboard does. Lean right: the front wheel assembly twists clockwise when viewed from above, the rear counter clockwise, like 4 wheel steering on a car. And then there's the strap on roller skates we had as kids in the 1960s, no practical way to stop except for taking a ...


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In the US, we (at least those of us of certain age) would call the item in your picture "roller blades" or "inline skates". Traditional roller skates have the wheels positioned like a car (two wheels side-by-side in the front and back).


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No, we don't. Pieces of broken glass are often called shards https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/shard We would only use crumb when speaking of a non-food substance if it was something with a soft texture similar to bread, such as rotten wood. For stone or (hard) wood it would be chips or fragments.


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When glass, porcelaine or stone breaks, it usually shatters. What you get are shards (larger pieces) and splinters (small, often longish pieces). If you talk about crumbles, I imagine very small pieces, typically created not by just dropping the glass, but for example by stepping on the glass or otherwise applying extra force, creating finer particles than ...


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Definitely a door frame. I am a native English speaker, and I have never heard anyone refer to it as a 'casing'. Many people would refer to it as the 'door jamb' too, although the jamb might, technically, be the part that the hinge is fixed to (I am not a carpenter, nor a builder, so I might be wrong about that). Alan.


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That object is a teapot. While the compound noun "water container" makes sense, it isn't really accepted, so if you say "water container" it will seem as if you're inventing the compound noun. I am guessing that you may be referring to the kettle, which is the container one fills with water and then sets on the stove to boil (once the water is boiling, one ...


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We normally clean windows, clean the car, clean the floor etc. which means freeing from dirt and dust something that is dirty. So, telling a child to clean their pee, which is a grammatical sentence, is literally asking them to wash their pee. Orbital Aussie's answer is therefore correct but I'd prefer to say “clean up the floor” or “mop that up” (mop up ...


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Yes, it is wrong to say just “clean” in that context. To give the additional sense of removal you want, you need to use the phrase verb “clean up”. For example: Little Oscar pulled handfuls of soil out of the potted plant onto the floor. I used a dustpan and brush to clean up the soil. [I cleaned the floor, but I cleaned up the soil.]


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Retreat is a possible option: Some animals retreat into their shells when in danger an act or process of withdrawing especially from what is difficult, dangerous, or disagreeable -- M-W meaning 1.a


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"Pretentious" adjective adjective: pretentious attempting to impress by affecting greater importance, talent, culture, etc., than is actually possessed.


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The term "keyboard warrior" may be appropriate here: keyboard warrior a person who makes abusive or aggressive posts on the Internet, typically one who conceals their true identity.


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I think this is partly a theological question rather than purely a language question. I'm going to assume you understand the theology aspect and know what you are trying to express in language. In English, there is a distinction between "pray for" and "pray to". Prayers are directed to a god or deity, and what you pray for is the subject matter of your ...


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It does sound natural. If you are looking for a more strictly correct word for this translation, "identifier" should be your choice. ID is a shorthand for identifier (in this context). This word implies "guaranteed to be unique". A PIN is not guaranteed to be unique despite its apparent meaning, and "RIN" would not be an understood term, so it may not be a ...


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The natural phrase to use in English would be 'index number' or 'index ref'. You could also use 'catalogue ref' or 'catalogue ID' if it is a large listing.


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As you found in the dictionary, "shame" is a feeling that a person can have. "Being ashamed" is having that feeling. "Shame on you" is a statement saying that the listener should have that feeling. It's short for "you should be ashamed of yourself" and this is what fits in your scenario. This isn't related to English, but please ask yourself first if this ...


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Sure, this happens in English all the time: Americans refer to their car's license plate number or just plate number and these frequently/usually contain letters in addition to digits: just try a Google image search. Britons similarly refer to the car's number plate and it's not purely numeric there either. Serial numbers and model numbers of consumer ...


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Perhaps instrumentation engineer is what you're looking for. This is from a training website: What is an instrumentation engineer? Instrumentation Engineers are responsible for planning, installing, monitoring and maintaining control systems and machinery within manufacturing environments. (source)


2

How about Don't tilt your head so far back when you drink from the bottle (keep it level) (Similar to Kate's comment on the other answer)


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I agree with @Sandeep Kumar; it’s neither ladder nor stairs. If I had to name it, I’d say it was a slide with foot holes.


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