New answers tagged

1

I think one of the possible answers is keypad tone. That is if you are typing. If you are referring to what you hear while you are waiting for the call to be answered, it's caller ringback tone. In North America, a standard caller RBT is repeated as a two-second tone with a four-second pause between tones. In other countries, like the UK, Ireland, ...


0

We may say phone line trilling.


1

There are a couple of possibilities. Both are from Merriam-Webster. drift: 1 a : to become driven or carried along (as by a current of water, wind, or air)       // a balloon drifting in the wind 2 b : to move or float smoothly and effortlessly So: The snowflake drifted down. settle: 2 a : to sink gradually or to the bottom So: The ...


1

"The baby is crawling up the stairs." The baby is climbing the stairs too, but an adult going up the stairs normally is also climbing the stairs, so "climbing" doesn't capture the baby's action exactly.


0

There are many choices. English corpora If you search there with the phrases a NOUN of clouds or the NOUN of clouds you will see many options (ranked by frequency). These are a few from the first page: mass, sea, line, blanket, layer, canopy et al.


0

A friend who is a girl may be either "a girl friend" or "a girlfriend". Girlfriend - sex = girl friend. Girl friend:- It means there is an empty space for someone more special. Girlfriend:- It means there is no space for someone else to be more important. The same explanation occurs with 'boy friend' and 'boyfriend'.


0

Making a weapon such as a rifle, pistol, machine-gun, etc, ready to fire is called 'cocking'. Technically, 'cocking' a weapon means to make the firing pin ready and able to strike the firing cap on the cartridge, if the trigger is pulled with the safety catch off. Informally some people use the expression for these steps: 1. Unlock the bolt and pull it back, ...


4

You have misunderstood how "Mac" works in English. It is part of a person's name, and has nothing to do with their gender, or the name of their father. Names come from many different sources, but there is no longer any meaning in any of them. *Henry Longfellow" might have been a short man; Andrew York wasn't from York; Miranda Richardson is a woman and ...


4

We can say ‘sea breeze’ or ‘onshore breeze’.


7

Do we just say sea wind? Sea wind seems very weird and unsophisticated. I am wondering if there's a specific word for "sea wind" or any wind related to the sea or ocean. The wind that comes from the sea is called sea breeze. Sea breeze: a light, cool wind blowing from the sea onto the land - Cambridge English Dictionary The wind that comes from the ...


4

Neither. One just says: She's floating. As opposed to doing the crawl or doing the breaststroke. In terms of swimming and associated skills. Now, in terms of description, if you say She is floating in the pool., she is obviously not floating in the river or in the sea. John: Where's Jean? Is she in the pool? Mary: No, look, she's down there floating in ...


-1

When your mouth and nose stick out, you are floating on the water. When they are not, you are floating in the water. The essential thing is that you are far enough out to survive. Dead bodies are sometimes floating in the water.


2

Rip-off central is a kind of slang term, and not one that would be commonly used. If anything, using just rip off would be better, even though that's still somewhat colloquial. A more common term for such a place is tourist trap: [Merriam-Webster] : a place that attracts and exploits tourists // The street market is a tourist trap that mostly sells ...


4

The feminine of 'Mac/ Mc' is 'Ni' or 'nighean'. NI (also nee and nighean or inghean or even inghean uí) In the Irish patronymic naming system, indicates that the individual is the daughter of the man whose surname follows. The form is: inghean uí , which means: daughter of a male descendant of . For example: Dearbhorgaill ...


1

Unconsciously or subconsciously would be my first choices. In these contexts they don't suggest "asleep", but "without being aware of the reason". You can do something "unconsciously" and later know that you did it, but you didn't consciously decide to do it. Alternatives that you might consider: "Absent-mindedly": When applied to an action it is rather ...


0

You dislike 'Unconsciously' because you dislike the inference that it means 'without consciousness', but I think you misconstrue what that means. In your example it means he performs the action of patting his pocket without the action rising to the level of his concious mind, not that the action itself lacks a consciousness. As a British English speaker I'd ...


4

"In" is fine in this context, "on" would tend to suggest that the object is mostly out of the water. But you could hear "on" being used in similar situations too. There is a lot of fuzziness, and both "in" or "on" are quite acceptable in many situations. It would be more likely to say "floating in the pool" rather than "in the water", as "water" is assumed....


30

It's called spoonerism. Examples: A blushing crow -> A crushing blow A lack of pies -> A pack of lies A well-boiled icicle -> A well-oiled bicycle Bedding wells -> wedding bells belly jeans -> jelly beans A spoonerism is an error in speech in which corresponding consonants, vowels, or morphemes are switched between two words in a phrase. Example: ...


1

On. "In" would be used only for something physically inside the tree itself. A bird's nest built on branches would be "on"; one built in a hollow would be "in."


0

Guardian; noun 2. A person who is legally responsible for the care and management of the person or property of one who is considered by law to be incompetent to manage his own affairs, as a child who is a minor. (source: American Heritage Dictionary) Also try Custodian, Trustee, Superintendent, Warden.


1

A clash is onomatopoeic and given by Lexico as clash NOUN 3 A loud jarring sound, as of metal objects being struck together. Without another thought, they spurred their horses forward as shouts erupted in the air and there was the clash of metal against metal. And as a verb, Lexico has clash VERB 1 Meet and come into violent conflict. ...


0

“I know that actor” “That actor looks familiar” “I recognize that actor” “I’m familiar with that actor” “I know who that is”


0

As my previous answer was deemed unsuitable, I’ll paraphrase it: For some time now, I have been using “order placer” to translate the Spanish phrase “quién hace el pedido” (person who places the order) into English in software strings. “Orderer” is another option, but as our colleague notes above, it doesn’t seem to be very widely used. Many people will just ...


0

I think you are taking about self standing banner which doesn't need any support or it also called as Roller banner


3

As per the comments, I feel “silly” is a bit lighter. You could try something more emotionally specific/descriptive, such as “embarrassed” or “guilty”. You could also prefix anything you say with “a bit” or “a little” to tone it down and make it sound less harsh. She felt a bit stupid/silly.


0

"Foolish" would be a slightly more sophisticated word to use.


1

The child (or the country) receiving support is called a dependant (Br.E.) / dependent (Am.E.): 1 : one that is dependent especially : a person who relies on another for support // an individual's spouse and dependent For the reverse, words as benefactor and patron may not be strong enough, i.e. they only indicate partial dependency. But perhaps ...


4

In geometry, a cylinder doesn't have a height limitation - any 3-dimensional shape with a circle at each end is a cylinder. A coin is a cylinder. Outside of geometry, I would probably use the word "disk" to describe something like a coin.


1

A couple verbs are possible in this context: "sink", "dip", "retract", etc. However, in general, in English this is described as a movement of the head as opposed to the neck. A person may sink his head or dip his head (into his coat/collar) when the chill in the air hits. You could say "sink/dip one's neck", but they are less natural-sounding. It's also ...


1

I doubt there is a single word. But "feminine" does not necessarily "connote" "overtly sexual in a female way" any more than "masculine" connotes "overtly sexual in a male way." Instead, the words "feminine" and "masculine" relate to all kinds of behavior that is considered typical of one sex or the other. (The loss of the distinction between the meanings of ...


0

Womanish (definitions here and here) might be an option, since it can apply derogatorily to both women and men. In the modern era, it is generally used to invoke negative stereotypes about women, or to suggest that men are being insufficiently masculine. It doesn't explicitly bring in sexual behavior like the words you've eliminated (suggestive, flirtatious ...


0

“She is in a baseball cap and red shoes” could be interpreted as” ... and nothing else”. Use “she wears a baseball cap and red shoes”. You put a key on a keychain or a key ring. Usually you have more than one key on a key ring.


7

Yes, that's drowning. There can be accidental drownings and there can be deliberate drownings. If you're planning to kill someone this way, what you call it is probably not the biggest issue. :-)


0

There are many kinds of keyswitch, from plastic membrane, through "tactile" (with a metal dome to give a click), to piezoelectric to tada! "full-travel". That's a phrase I saw looking through some electronic supplier catalogs. It might be a good starting point for the specification, or as a term for further search.


0

"That is the story of my life!" Wiktionary You can take this from fairly mild, "The bus pulled out just as I got there--story of my life!" to extreme depending on tone of voice, context, and adding in swearing to taste. ("The bus pulled out just as I got there, and ran over my bicycle on the way--story of my fucking life!") With enough context and the ...


6

The person who didn't get the job might say: That's just my luck. An observer might say: Sorry; that's so unlucky.


1

"It" is used to refer to a thing previously mentioned or easily identified. For example, if you pointed at a loose piece of laminate and said "don't trip over it", you are identifying what "it" is. Similarly, if you said "there is a loose piece of laminate - don't trip over it", you have made it clear. Saying "the piece" instead of "it" is no clearer ...


0

It's possible, but rather unusual, to talk about "chips in/on the wall" Its more likely that only the paint is damaged: There's a chip in the paint here. The paint is chipped. Or you could use "damaged" To prevent damage to the paintwork, plastic covers can be fitted to protruding corners.


5

The problem with trying to answer a question like this is that informal English has literally hundreds, possibly thousands, of ways to express sympathy for a bad outcome by blaming it on a pattern of bad outcomes due to chance. This is made worse because (a) such informal phrases change relativly rapidly, and (b) they frequently employ irony to say one thing ...


2

A more idiomatic expression is "What is the probability/likelihood of collision between artificial satellites in space." Another possible way to express the same idea is "How likely/probable is a collision between artificial satellites." I suggest "... collision ... between ..." because "striking of" might mean that someone is shooting at the ...


9

Go with ... Octofortnight Eight two-week periods ~= 4 months :D


1

I recommend your consideration of Jason Bassford's comment. There are a number of verbs that indicate mode of propulsion on travel in a river or stream. And of course your comment about Venice is absurd because Venice is on a lagoon of the sea so there is no upstream or downstream; there is only with the flood or with the ebb. But regardless of the mode of ...


2

There's a phrase "out of the frying pan and into the fire." It conveys the image of a fish frying in a pan and it's very hot for it. All of a sudden, the fish falls out of the pan and straight into the fire. As hot as it was in the frying pan, it's a lot worse in the actual fire. See here for more. This is a very common idiom for this idea.


24

One-third of a year could work: "For the first third of the year, sales were down. They picked up in the second period, but fell flat again in the final third." It is works ok in this context, but 4 month period is probably clearer.


44

It isn't common to speak of a four-month period, at least in the United States where I live. Thus, although others have suggested words for this, my recommendation is to not use them. Very few people would use such a word in English; the more natural way is to speak of a four-month period or some variation on that expression. For example: Sales were down ...


33

It's not in the most reputable dictionaries, but Wiktionary has it: quadrimester. It is a cousin of the more commonly used trimester, which means three months. It is composed of the Latin/French words for four and month.


-2

The verb sponsor seems best in your case:


1

From a clarification under the question, when you go to a supermaket, the person you pay for your groceries is the cashier: [Merriam-Webster] : one that has charge of money: such as a : a high officer in a bank or trust company responsible for moneys received and expended b : one who collects and records payments c : an employee (as in a store) ...


1

Taking A as the person who sent B shopping, the blank could be filled in by "grocer" or more generally, "shopkeeper". ( This is keeping in mind that such informal credit transactions probably don't take place in a supermarket, but in a small country store where the customer and the shopkeeper/owner know each other.)


1

Here is one way of saying it... "After you have laid your head on the pillow, your head is lying on the pillow." The key to the puzzle is actually mentioned on the same dictionary page you already quoted. It says "Which Word? lay / lie" Lie is a different word than lay. Lying means reclining. Laying means placing. Two completely different words. So, ...


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