New answers tagged

1

I’d say that it has metal loops. That’s what another pimple remover describes them as in its instructions: Place the thin wire loop end on the area and press down firmly. (Plus, there is a similar looking tool used in pottery that is called a loop tool.)


0

If financial situation of citizens is growing, we would call it economic success in the country. If the population is growing, we call it a demographic success. What if citizens' freedoms (like freedom of speech, of travelling, of religion, etc.) are growing, how would we describe that success? Enhanced Civic Entitlements or Enhanced Civic Liberties Try ...


0

Fully agreed to WhiskeyChief but I see that the answer still does not satisfy you so I'm forced to come up with something that is not usual. You are searching for a five-legged elephant. As FumbleFingers suggested, you need a different verb to express the success of 'so-called' growth in freedom. Forcefully, you may opt for liberty rather than freedom in ...


0

Situation D Someone wants to say something but immediately forgets, and he/she mocks himself/herself: "Oh I just ___(requested word/phrase)" In this situation one might say: I have a memory/mind like a sieve. (= I have an extremely bad memory) Perhaps, something is on the tip of your tongue (you know it (e.g. a name) but you can't remember it at the ...


3

"Silly me!" and variants like "I'm (so) dumb" are often used in the first person. Although I think a simple "oops" or "whoops" are even more common. As an actual name for the event, "having a brain fart" is the most common one I encounter. That said, I think generally people just describe what happened without giving it such a label. "What possessed you??" ...


0

One possibility is to call it the "financial sector" or the "financial market", as it represents a collective of various business entities that trade in a wide range of financial products as well as the markets where the trading takes place. It doesn't matter if these businesses are physically located on the actual Wall Street or not -- it's still fine to ...


3

Wall Street isn't an entity in any unified sense--it's a place name used as a metonym for American financial markets/big business.


12

Discombobulated is a nice word that implies temporary confusion.


3

For situation A, I've used the excuse "I guess I can't do math today." Situation B is definitely an example of a "senior moment". While situation D is where "brain fart" could easily be used. The instance of Situation C is more difficult. I can't think of a good word of phrase for that one. About the only thing I can think of is "lose your mind". "Losing ...


6

I quite often use the phrase 'slipped a cog', implying my mental machinery momentarily stuttered. I think I picked the phrase up from a grandparent several decades back.


11

'I just lost my train of thought' can be described in the case that I just forgot what I was talking or thinking previously, it might suit some of your situations. Merriam-Webster's definition of train of thought even includes a sample usage that mirrors what you are asking about: train of thought (noun phrase) a series of thoughts or ideas that ...


6

I very much agree with Andrew, But then: Situation A is a little bit exceptional as, compared to the other situations, it's a kind of "overthinking" issue. I would generally say that in English it's probably a separate word (literally overthinking) For Situations B, C, and D you could say: British English "Lapse": a slip; error to have a blackout ...


0

A very good answer in the comments: I think foreign-backed would also be a good suggestion. Even better if you know the country. US-backed or UK-orchestrated for instance (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…) – Smock


38

"Blank out", "brain glitch", and "brain fart" are not mental illnesses. They are all legitimate, albeit possibly crude, vernacular for temporary stupidity. There are others such as "senior moment". This is a facetious reference to the kind of absent-minded dementia occurring in the elderly. I forgot my phone when I left the house this morning. I must ...


0

"Conterminous" is an infrequently used word in English. It is used in contemporary English in technical contexts. For example, the United Stated Geological Survey's book on map projections refers to the 48 "conterminous" states of the United States, to distinguish them from Alaska and Hawaii: The USGS uses the Equidistant Cylindrical projection for ...


1

"Component", "tool", and "program" are all words for pieces of software that can either stand alone, or be part of a larger software application. An exception: In Visual Basic, "components" and "widgets" are only available as part of dynamic linked libraries. In programming environments similar to Visual Basic, "components" are not stand-alone programs ...


1

It depends on the type of place they're working. In a museum they're called 'docents'. In a forest or wild area they're called 'rangers'. They might be called 'security guards' in public places. Sometimes the city police or county sheriff do those tasks. There's not one word that covers them all, and two different places of the same type might use different ...


0

I would shorten the sentence and not worry about that second verb at all: Allows for parameters to be specified per country so they can be uniquely aligned to regional regulations. Since the word allow is used, it makes it sound as if the alignment with regional regulations is possible, but not necessarily a given, which is why I used so they can be. ...


0

"Later part" is a fine term. If you know more precisely, you can say things like "the last third" or "the last 25 minutes" or "starting at the 90 minute mark" or whatever the measurement might be.


0

For aerobics, there is a word aerobicist, however it doesn't have much definition: Definition of aerobicist in English: aerobicist noun See aerobics From Lexico, powered by Oxford It's the word I thought of, and there are a few references to it, but normally separate from aerobics from what I have seen.


2

I'd slightly shorten the sentence and use to comply with: Allows for parameters to be specified per country to comply with regional regulations Merriam Webster defines it as 1 : to conform, submit, or adapt (as to a regulation or to another's wishes) as required or requested // comply with federal law // the devices comply with industry standards


1

The normal use (at least in my experience, I have a technical/scientific background) is to say the interval as the elapsed time between events that happen with a known frequency. So if interval is the reciprocal of rate then we might think that frame interval is the reciprocal of frame rate. However in regards to video, this does not appear to be in common ...


2

According to Wikipedia, this phenomenon is known as non-lexical vocables in music, and includes various styles like doo-wop and scat, as well as terms like la la la and da da da. Non-lexical vocables, which may be mixed with meaningful text, are a form of nonsense syllable used in a wide variety of music. A common English example would be "la la la", "na ...


1

The example you give is partially in English and partially in what I undestand is Gaelic: I couldn't tell you if the refrain has words in it or not: the song Nil 'Na Lá is a traditional song, whose title means "Daybreak has not yet come". https://brendannolan.com/lyrics/nilnala.html Scat is the term used for jazz non-word singing Wikipedia Lilting is for ...


1

Frame duration? This quick Google Search gives quite a few people who are using it in support questions for video editing, and here is a definition on the website for the Institute for Telecommunication Services: frame duration: The time between the beginning of a frame and the end of that frame. Note: For fixed-length frames, at a fixed data rate, frame ...


0

If you want to be completely unambiguous, you could simply say Subject: My last day here will be 2019-mm-dd Body: It has been a pleasure working with all of you, but my final day will be 2019-mm-dd. If you have any questions about projects I was working on, please direct them to my manager, Susan Sarandon. If you want to stay in touch, please connect ...


0

Social-liberty-success Or Societal-autonomy-success Or Liberal-life-success


6

The requirements of the question are: an adjective that describes “freedom” or “liberty” the word success This is very difficult. Not every noun in English has a good adjective form. Some nouns have good adjectives: economics — economic (or economical) ecology — ecological trees — arboreal cows — bovine pigs — porcine ...


2

home time [mass noun] The time at which school or work finishes and one goes home. ‘The bell rang for home time’ It's true that definition includes ...or work [finishes], but I at least think it's essentially a childish usage. In the "grown-up" world of work, we use a different (slightly "slangy") alternative to avoid that association... knocking-off time [...


2

The end of the day, The end of the school day, or maybe (in spoken American English) “the end of last period today.” are all fine. Dismissal, or Dismissal today would be the formal term in American usage. School break refers to the holidays between terms, like winter break, winter vacation, spring break or summer break. “Assembly” and “...


-1

There’s not a specific word for that person—other than perhaps a “fan”—that I’m aware of. However, to point out something that really bothers me, in your sentence you used the word “them” as apposed to him or her—“to join them on stage.” I know that using them or they to mean a single person of unknown gender is all but absolute these days, but it is very ...


0

There are lots of words that could be used, and usually the specific role would indicate the name of the role used. Some of the words could be: Warden - A person responsible for the supervision of a particular place or activity or for enforcing the regulations associated with it. ‘the warden of a nature reserve’ ‘an air-raid warden’ https://www....


0

Many of the places I have visited use the term tourist police to describe officers who (to varying degrees) are trained to look after the safety and security of tourists. I am not sure whether their role covers the other items that you mentioned.


51

A studio is a working space for an artist. a: the working place of a painter, sculptor, or photographer b: a place for the study of an art (such as dancing, singing, or acting)


1

I would say they are all telephones, or simply phones. Telephone A telephone (derived from the Greek: τῆλε, tēle, "far" and φωνή, phōnē, "voice", together meaning "distant voice"), or phone, is a telecommunications device that permits two or more users to conduct a conversation when they are too far apart to be heard directly. A telephone converts ...


1

An increase in peoples Civic Freedoms and/or Liberties.


1

There is dogsbody: [Lexico (Oxford)] A person who is given menial tasks to do, especially a junior in an office. ‘I got myself a job as typist and general dogsbody on a small magazine’ Note that this seems to be an informally used UK expression. (Also, it's not normally hyphenated.) -- And also dog-tired: [Merriam-Webster] : very tired : ...


-3

There is no verb that applies to all those pictures. But pictures #1, 3, 5, and 6 show someone with an arm or both arms fully extended.


1

One would only say that the patient was asked to perform the test, if the test was one that the patient could self-administer. For example, there are now (and have been for a good number of years) blood-sugar tests where the patient punctures his or her skin, applies a drop of blood to a special test strip, inserts this into a meter, and reads off a blood-...


0

Yep... in Britain and Ireland. Not commonly turned into a noun, but people will know exactly what you mean in context. Generally a phrasal verb. In Ireland and Britain that is. Can't advise on American English. For sure, 'a lie in'and 'to have a lie in' are very common in Ireland... and seen as a great luxury. Wohooo... I can have a lie in tomorrow! I think ...


2

While there may be a technical medical term, there is nothing better than "allergy" in general use. Secondary drowning is caused by an edema in the lungs, not an immune response.


1

It depends on the exact context, but I would probably call them "bad/poor communicators", though something more tactful would be required if I had to say this to their face. The polite method would be to emphasise that someone else was a "better communicator", or "better at public speaking".


1

What's the word for "stationed", but for non-military people? I am thinking about non-military personnel such as ambassadors, and other non-military people working abroad. You have used the word "stationed" This is technically incorrect although it commonly spoken. "stationed at" would be correct. The word you are looking for is Posted and it applies to ...


1

Governmental personnel, particularly diplomats, are also said to be "stationed" in a particular country or location. Private employees are often said to be "assigned" to a particular place, or to be "located" in a place. The first emphasizes the decision of the employer. Other terms might be used, but I think these are the most common ones.


1

The [Wikipedia article on phrasal verbs] (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phrasal_verb) lists "teeing off on" as a "particle-prepositional verb". I would think this would also apply to "run out on" and similar constructions. The article also says: The terminology of phrasal verbs is inconsistent. Modern theories of syntax tend to use the term phrasal verb ...


2

There is the word humour (US humor) for which Lexico has humour VERB 1 Comply with the wishes of (someone) in order to keep them content, however unreasonable such wishes might be. But we humoured him, since he spoke our sort of language. Merriam-Webster has humor verb 1 : to soothe or content (someone) by indulgence : to comply with the ...


1

What do you think of the word 'cooperate?' I decided to cooperate after my friend decided to make fun of me and call me Barney


-1

The word I was looking for was 'expose' Through this discussion I was exposed to a lot of new perspectives.


2

I really like this list of Verbs of Attribution (or Quoting Verbs) from https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/quotations/ (and because it gives more information about using quotes overall, it's the one I most often shared with students): Excerpt: add remark exclaim announce reply state comment respond estimate write point out predict argue ...


30

I think that the term that you're looking for is continuity error. According to the Wikipedia: Continuity In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of people, plot, objects, and places seen by the reader or viewer over some period of time. Continuity errors Most continuity errors are subtle and minor, such as changes in the ...


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