New answers tagged

2

If you mean the shape of the chimney, taking up the whole roof of the roof, it seems like a particular architectural form of a stone hood. This is “hood” in the sense of hood n. 3d: an enclosure or canopy provided with a draft for carrying off fumes, sprays, smokes, or dusts If instead you mean the fireplace in the center of the house, around which the ...


1

An actively working person is "employed". A more specific term for someone who is working and earning money is "gainfully employed". It depends on what you mean by "active", because a person can be "employed" if they have a current contract of employment, yet they may not be "present" at work for a number of reasons - maternity leave, annual leave (vacation)...


2

Employed can mean "to provide with a job that pays wages or a salary". The field could be "currently employed".


0

If I understand correctly, that type of a thing would normally be called factory - RFFactory, for instance. I don't think that's what you're aiming for, though. Would 'StandardRF', 'CommonRF', 'ImplementedRF' or 'DerivedRF' work? Does this new object implement an interface? Could you call it 'IStandardRFProduct', or maybe just IRF?


1

In decreasing order of formality, common and appropriate ways of discussing this body part are abdomen, stomach and belly. Belly is certainly not the most formal term, but I wouldn't call it slang. Referring to a woman's "pregnant belly" is very common--much more common than "pregnant stomach" or "pregnant abdomen." (See this ngram) "Inflated abdomen" is ...


0

"Grew" would be the most appropriate word. It is quite common to say that "feelings grow", certainly more idiomatic than other synonyms. Here are some example sentences using the expression "the feeling grew": The feeling grew that the business had been force-fed, and had overreached itself. As the day passed, the feeling grew in the Army of ...


1

I would suggest "on the rise" if you prefer an idiom. There are virtually an indefinite number of expressions that can satisfy the requirement-astonishing, phenomenal, spectacular, impressive, remarkable and so on and so forth.


1

phenomenal serves the purpose. Here are three links which show synonyms for phenomenal.You can use any of them for your sentence. https://thesaurus.yourdictionary.com/wondrous https://thesaurus.yourdictionary.com/remarkable https://thesaurus.yourdictionary.com/phenomenal


7

"Escalation" is the commonly used word in business for passing work to a senior. From the website Business Pundit: Escalation as a General Business Term In business in general, escalation refers to sending a project to a higher level of the organization for resolution. For example, imagine that an organization’s computers are slow. Helpdesk finds the ...


14

The most common phrases for this concept are "civic duties," "civic responsibilities," or "civic engagement." To say that something is a civic duty can imply that the actions are mandated by the government--mandatory jury service, taxation or mandatory voting, to name a few examples. To say that something is a civic responsibility doesn't imply as ...


0

half-baked For what it's worth, this figure of speech comes from the topic of your book: cooking. dictionary.com insufficiently cooked Cambridge not planned or considered carefully enough


1

Globule is a fun word for this: a tiny globe or ball especially of a liquid—MW Example in use (from a gross story): The man looks into the camera and smiles before releasing the globule of spit from his mouth, not once but TWICE.—Daily Mirror


4

You could say any of the following: X happens every other month. X takes place every other month, starting January. From Cambridge: every other something: not each one in a series, but every two. Example: The conference used to be held every year, but now it takes place every other year. We get together every other Saturday for lunch.


2

You might be interested in drool: drool 1 : saliva trickling from the mouth // wipe the drool from his chin (M-W) It's uncountable, so notice the difference in the example: There was drool dangling from her chin.


0

If your intention is to express admiration about the first chapter and disappointment about the lack of same quality in the next chapters, you just write something in the sense: "This is good but that not." The first chapter is written great while the latter ones not so. If your intention is to express what specifically you miss in the latter chapters, ...


2

"Crude" is a good word for something that is "constructed in a rudimentary or makeshift way", but it does have other definitions too, so when used, your context must be clear. One might say "this is a crude copy of [x]", which would be quite clear because the word "copy" indicates that you are referring to the item's creation. However, in your context of ...


0

There are lots of possiblities, but maybe "improved". We're going to improve our back yard with some decking and a play area. Renovated (if you are restoring it to a good state) Our back yard was full of weeds, so we dug them all up and renovated it with new plants. Revamped is a casual way of saying the same.


3

You are right "to present" and "to gift" are rather formal present is most commonly used in the format "I present to you the award for..." In your sentence I would use give, give does mean a present, a gift I was going to give you another book Here is a warning: I am waiting for the 'but' at the end of that because of the 'was'. I was going to give ...


1

Cut the conversation short He 'cut the conversation short' or 'brought it to a close' or 'concluded it swiftly' or 'deftly ended it' - by lying to her.


2

Several terms are understood These terms are widely acceptable: ✔️🤩 Yes: Dr. Purple's Ph.D. advisees (Stanford, Duke, Columbia Univ.) ✔️🤩 Yes: Dr. Mauve's doctoral students (Geo. Washington Univ., Univ. of Oregon, Univ. of Missouri) In a medical context (physicians, dentistry, etc.) postgraduates are called: ✔️ Yes: Dr. Maroon's ...


0

Finally, I find the one in this case: fellow student.


2

"Makeshift" doesn't apply to people, since you don't bodge them together. I think you mean some sort of inferior substitute, like: I could work as a stand-in Linux administrator, but not a fully-fledged administrator or I could work as a backup Linux administrator, but not a fully-fledged administrator or I could work as a temporary Linux ...


0

Communicating. Or 'networking' as a verb. You can say 'communicating with various computers', and refer to the whole thing as 'the computer network'. Because 'communicating' is a term that refers to the to and fro-ing of communication that you seem to wish to describe. If they are in the network, they are 'communicating', if not, then not. Data tags like '...


3

Depending on what kind of data transmission you have in mind, broadcast or multicast might be the word you're looking for. If you're not talking about communication protocols for sending data to multiple computers simultaneously, but only the fact that you're somehow sending data to multiple computers, then distribute might be a good verb. This verb is not ...


0

I also feel "immaterial" would be a word used in an economic context, i.e. unimportant under the circumstances; irrelevant. [1] Since you're saying it's effectively zero in the global context. [1] https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/immaterial


0

The word I like best in this context is meager: 2 b : deficient in quality or quantity // a meager diet So, and to rephrase the sentence slightly in order to make it more natural with the word: The country has a meager share of the global output.


3

It looks like maybe you are concerned with avoiding words that aren't idiomatic rather than necessarily finding a less obvious word. If that's true, then, of the words you mentioned: small: Perfectly idiomatic. In the example of being only 1% of global output, I would choose "very small." little: Less idiomatic in this case. It is natural to say "very ...


3

Insignificant While this word doesn't fit every context, when comparing a slice of some larger total insignificant seems the most appropriate word. A more day-to-day example would be a vacation budget: if you spend $1,500 on your plane ticket, a $10 charge to pick your seat is insignificant. (Of course, it still manages to upset people!) The term is used ...


4

When you divide something up and single out one portion of it for consideration, that portion is called a "share". When we compare shares we talk about their sizes. "Small" and "tiny" are sizes. "Few" is not a size, but a quantity. It tells how many, not how big, so it isn't appropriate for a description of a share. "Low" tells either height, or (in this ...


2

Minimal If the sense is that the percentage of global domestic product should be higher, then the current level of output might be considered inadequate. If so, the word "minimal" might fit. Minimal means: the least possible barely adequate very small or slight Any of these connotations would probably be appropriate, but which sense is being communicated ...


5

In contrast with Ben Kovitz's answer, I personally don't see the need to acquire a printed reference when online resources are so plentiful and so thorough. In these cases I turn to thesaurus.com: small: limited, meager, minuscule, modest, paltry, poor, slight, minute, humble, inconsequential, insufficient, piddling, pitiful, puny, trivial, negligible, ...


6

One possibility, if you want to emphasize very strongly that the country's share is small, is minuscule: The country's share of the global output is minuscule. But to recommend a specific word, we would need to know much more about the point that you want to make about the country. You should look over the many available synonyms and choose the one that ...


0

Foehn is the international agreed term for winds that are warmed and dried by descent. Foehn is used everywhere in scientific literature. A reason for this is that foehn-research has a long history in Switzerland and Austria where people speak german (Föhn). However, other terms exist for the same phenomena. In the Rocky Mountains its chinook, in Argentine ...


0

Not really, and this fact keeps our poets busy. A word that might be helpful to you is "deprived", in that one might feel deprived of something one had that one lost. Also, we have the word "bereft", technically from the word "bereave", meaning to suffer the loss of a loved one. To be bereft is to be suffering for want of something or someone. You may ...


2

There is a super obscure english word, desiderium, that is defined as having feelings for something that we no longer have, and wish very much that we did. No one actually uses it in conversation and it's not exactly "wanting something more now that you can't have it. It's best to describe that feeling with multiple words.


1

I can't think of anything that is relevant that fits in the blank (without any surrounding changes) followed by a "by". The first "by" is misplaced; it does not fit there. I think what you need is a "for". The product is guaranteed to be reliable for 10 years of use by the military. It stills sounds off to me. Why not rephrase it? This is one option: ...


1

According to Wikipedia, they're simply called "placeholder names"


1

I would say this as it is more natural: A: I don't know their price separately but the price put together cost us $30. You are referring to the price put together therefore it is appropriate to add the word price otherwise it doesn’t fully make sense as to what you’re describing.


1

How can I say "I'm word here" instead of "I'm very tired"? A good choice is "I'm exhausted". Other possibilities: "I'm bushed" adjective Informal. exhausted; tired out: After all that exercise, I'm bushed. "I'm beat" adjective Informal. exhausted; worn out. For whatever reason, I personally don't favor those, and would just use ...


1

(Protip: 'Superlative' generally refers to things such as 'best', 'worst', 'hottest', 'most strange') There are various stronger synonyms you could use such as 'exhausted', 'shattered', (UK) 'knackered'. A little more colourfully you can say 'I'm dead on my feet.'


1

A noun for somebody who has taught themself is autodidact: [Merriam-Webster] : a self-taught person // was an autodidact who read voraciously // Friends and colleagues described Dr. Tanton as a Renaissance man and a voracious autodidact. — Nicholas Kulish, New York Times, "Dr. John Tanton, Quiet Catalyst in Anti-Immigration Drive, Dies at 85," 18 ...


2

Overview I think any of "inconsistent" "irregular", "variable", "varied", or "uneven" could work for this. I think you have been too ready to accept a single definition as barring a perfectly valid use of a word. The choice of which term to use there is a matter of style and personal choice. Dictionary citations Irregular Merriam-Webster gives: ...


2

"Worker A had regular weekly earnings... " works fine. consistent or steady also can be used with the same meaning. I think the problem lies in your research. You did the right thing, but unfortunately Google and Ngram do not always return the results you would expect. I've been chided here for quoting their statistics, so I don't rely on them any more. ...


1

I think that finding a single word that can mean all of the things you want it to will be difficult. However I think one word that has a broad enough meaning to be able to be applied to success for all of your points of view( "financially, educationally, emotionally, experiental") would be self-motivated. However I'm not sure this word really carries the ...


2

A few points in addition to the answer by user Rob Lambden. It is more usual to say "conventions" rather than "convention" in this construction. Also, since social conventions are specific to a particular society, and often to a particular society at a particular time or in a particular era, it is better to specify the context of the conventions intended. ...


2

Your example makes better use of "other": Sorry, I just meant something I observe in other discussions, not in our past topics But in other contexts, you can use other adjectives. See below: In the different discussions that I had, I noticed... During the various discussions in the past... You may even use "elsewhere", but with a different word ...


5

There are a number of ways you can say this. The phrase 'contrary to social convention' is going to be understood, but would not be a usual phrase. Rather than say "Having a child from a friend (who you are not married to)" it would be shorter and clearer to say "Having a child outside marriage" - the more traditional phrase of "outside wedlock" would ...


-1

Underdog fits what you are looking for: An underdog is a person or group in a competition, usually in sports and creative works, who is not favored to win and popularly expected to lose. The party, team, or individual expected to win is called the favorite or top dog. In the case where an underdog wins, the outcome is an upset.


1

The precise gesture may be culturally dependent, but I think "rolled his eyes" could describe this. roll one's eyes To turn one's eyes upward or around in a circle, usually as an expression of exasperation, annoyance, impatience, or disdain.


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