New answers tagged

4

You use fingers to play the flute, so you can say "fingering the flute". Practice without making a sound by fingering on a pencil. The "buttons" on a flute are called "keys" so you can use "keying". The teacher demonstrated by keying the flute without playing it. In the second example you would use "playing&...


1

"Length, breadth and depth of the program". This allows you to describe the structure in two dimensions. A broad program covers many different topics. A deep program covers only a few topics but covers those very completely. A long program lasts for many terms and so allows for greater breadth and/or depth. However "scope" and "...


1

I've called it a "Tetra Pak" since I was a child. It seems this term is actually the name of the company that developed the technology, and the package itself is called a "Tetra Brik".


3

While a vaguer term might include everything you need it to and more, I think it is best to be precise, especially in formal writing. If your connotations are the number of terms and the numbers of courses, then one refers to time and the other to variety. You could therefore say: the length and diversity of the programme Diversity is defined as the fact ...


3

"Popper" is an Australian term which I think comes from how when you're finished you can blow the carton up and jump on it to make a "pop" sound (although not too certain on this). I think however that this is a regional variation within Australia even as some people (esp. Victorians and Tasmanians) call it a "Juice box" and ...


3

This is a bun. A bun is a type of hairstyle in which the hair is pulled back from the face, twisted or plaited, and wrapped in a circular coil around itself, typically on top or back of the head or just above the neck. The specific hairstyle is a double bun, or a pigtail bun. It's also known as the "odango with pigtails" hairstyle.


2

The round part is called a bun NOUN A hairstyle in which the hair is drawn back into a tight coil at the back of the head. From Lexico. See also various images such as #2: Dutch Braids into Voluminous Buns and others in the series. There are numerous hairstyles that use a bun, and the question asks for the name of the blob of hair.


1

Both "crossable" and "passable" have the idea of "going through, from one side to the other": "This road is so busy with cars it is uncrossable". You could use "uncrossable" to describe the borders, but not the country You could perhaps use "unenterable": Not possible to be entered. The borders of ...


1

Yes, you can pull down the sun visor, and put the sun visor up. There are lots of idiomatic ways to say this. Perhaps "fold down" and "fold away". You should probably usually say "sun visor", as "visor" (without modification) usually means a transparent (or perforated) face-shield, such as on a motorcycle helmet. You ...


1

You can discover new interests by accident, so to "stumble on" something works. The dictionary page you've linked to says: to find or learn about (something) unexpectedly which describes finding a new interest when you didn't expect it.


4

Yes, you are right. Leave out might mean you did it intentionally. Miss out (which, as gotube points out and Lexico confirms, is not used in the US) sounds the most accidental. This may be because the word miss on its own is so often associated with failure. leave out: Fail to include someone or something. miss out: [British] Fail to include someone or ...


0

I am not sure exactly which you are trying to say: Due to data drift, the model currently being used is to be replaced. Due to data drift, the model currently being used is to be replaced by an improved model


2

Is there a difference between 'speak fluently' and 'speak smoothly' in meaning? Wiktionary can shed some light on this: Fluent: In casual use, “fluency” refers to language proficiency broadly, while in narrow use it refers to using a language flowingly, rather than haltingly. Smooth: Glib (Artfully persuasive but insincere in nature; smooth-talking, ...


6

Generally, when people refer to their level in a certain language, the idiomatic technical word is fluent (or speak fluently). Smooth is used more to describe the manner of speech rather than to assess the level of language proficiency. As in smooth-talker: a person who gets another person to do their bidding by using a slick, gently persuasive, practised, ...


3

The adjectives "smoothly" and "fluently" might be interpreted differently in different contexts. For a native speaker, "fluently" might be understood to mean: "quickly, clearly, using complex and technical vocabulary precisely" Whereas "smoothly might mean in a gentle flowing intonation." For a learner "...


1

Two words for singing without words are vocalise and scat. The are explained at length (with links to examples) here: Quora.com sing-without-words The dictionaries I looked at show a verb sense for scat, but only the noun sense for vocalise. (Note that this sense of vocalise is pronounced differently than vocalise as the British spelling of vocalize - see ...


1

I can only answer for the UK. The term staff room is commonly in use for a room provided for the medical and other staff to relax and gossip. It may also have food and drinks. The term doctors mess is also used, here is a link to one in the south of the UK http://www.sghdoctorsmess.co.uk/. I would expect that if such a facility were restricted to a specific ...


1

I one of the questions here is whether a "logo" can be animated, and the Wikipedia article for Leo the Lion sure seems to think so. As you mentioned, it can also be called an "intro" but I don't think there's a more technical term for it than that. The usage of "intro" is also pretty wide, as it can also refer to a musical or ...


0

In "legalese", including in this loan agreement, "shall" is the preferred modal verb to refer to the future. Replace "shall" with "will" as you read and the meaning might become clearer. For example, clause 3 says, "The borrower is obligated to pay back the loan..." while clause 4 says, "The borrower ...


0

If I had to refer to those specifically, I would call them tines. 1 : a slender pointed projecting part : prong as in "Look, my hairclip has a broken tine." This word does seem to be in actual usage, for example in US Patent US7066185B2: The legs each have a tine base and a number of curved tines...


1

Sure, "teeth", "claws", "prongs", "grippy bits"... There's No well-established term that I am aware of, though there may be one used by hairgrip designers and manufacturers. It is just not something that comes up in everyday conversations very often. Oh look one of the grippy bits has broken off my pink hairgrip. ...


2

Doing an image search for "circular saw parts", shows images like the following, so the part appears to be called a base plate. Other images also refer to it as just a "base", or just a "plate".


1

"Thrust" is a verb often associated with both sword and knife combat"poke" not so much. Another such word is "stab" (though generally much more with knives than swords). However, I would usually expect an attack against a dragon's wing to be some kind of slash (that is an arcing movement). I suppose if your hero is on top of the ...


1

Actually what you ask in your question is different from what you ask in the title. The answer to the title might include "selectable", but of course this word cannot be used the way you want, because what you want is not an adjective for "able to be chosen" but rather for "that is to be chosen". One option (already given by ...


9

I would use "a book of the student's choice". Of X's choice (often of your choice, but equally valid as of my choice, of her choice, of the President's choice, etc.) is an idiom that means "that X chooses from all of the available options". This implies that the student can choose any book, but unlike optional, means that the choice ...


8

I'm guessing that word is mansplaining the explanation of something by a man, typically to a woman, in a manner regarded as condescending or patronizing. And here's a flowchart taken from the BBC website


1

They’re slackers, or someone “who shirks work or responsibility.” It is fairly informal, and in a different context can imply more than just laziness, as the other definitions from that link explain. The manager, after inspecting the office, found that three employees were slackers and gossiped throughout the day. I often “slack” or “slack off” on the ...


0

If a person has not yet been charged, they are detained. custody could also be used, but usually means that the person has been charged and is awaiting trial. Given the circumstances that you outlined, I think that the best way to say it would be "he was held overnight". Here is an example: He was held overnight at Beau Vallon Police Station and ...


0

The answer probably depends on which country you are in. Most countries have official names for these places. For example, Australia has 'remand centres' ("A remand prisoner is someone held in custody while waiting for their trial or sentencing") so your sentence would be 'He was not in prison, he was in a remand centre (or just 'in remand'). (This ...


0

If someone is held by police overnight specifically because they were dangerously drunk and had to be removed from society until they sobered up, that's the drunk tank. If the same thing happens for any similar reason, like being in a fight when they weren't necessarily drunk, it's called lock-up.


2

Even though they are used interchangeably in colloquial English, a jail is a place where you're held pending a trial or if you haven't committed a major crime. Prisons are for people who have been sentenced, and the sentences are usually longer. Another term I have heard used is "in [police] custody," which I interpret to mean detention in a police ...


-1

Eureka! I found it, from Ancient Greek. Eureka (Ancient Greek: εὕρηκα) is an interjection used to celebrate a discovery or invention. It is a transliteration of an exclamation attributed to Ancient Greek mathematician and inventor Archimedes. eureka


0

You could say: I understood It became clear it all fell into place The penny dropped (chiefly British idiom) It dawned on me (refers more to having an idea or realisation than understanding) I had a lightbulb moment (usually means having a sudden, good idea) it hit/struck me (a realisation, perhaps upon noticing something)


0

lay the groundwork "to provide the right conditions" -- Merriam-Webster Any work police officers do before asking the "dangerous" question to put a suspect in a particular frame of mind so that they are more likely to say something self-incriminating, they are laying the groundwork for that question.


4

The phrasal verb soften up has the definition: to treat (someone) very well or kindly in order to make that person more likely to help one, give one something, etc. So you could say, "The police softened up the suspect with some friendly questions before getting to the tough one."


3

There are a number of words that you might use, regardless of which one you ran across previously. Each will have different implications. At the top of our list should probably be "scavenge", which indicates trying to find something of value in a location where what might mostly be found is mostly leftovers. Whichever other words we find, "...


4

The technique is called scoring, but the individual cuts are just called cuts or slashes. Start at the top of the round (the side farthest from you) and begin making diagonal slashes in series from top to bottom. I like to add a gentle curve as the cuts progress from top to bottom; this curved set looks nice when the loaf expands up and outward in the oven. ...


2

You probably need expenditure records: I don't trust them. Their expenditure records are not clear. You can omit donations, since expenditure implies spending of money. An expenditure record is a written record of money spent (vocabulary.com) EDIT: If you need a word for a document that will show future expenditure then use spending plan which means: a ...


4

An even less common word is gleaning which means to "collect leftover crops from farmers' fields after they have been commercially harvested." In this instance, your protagonist is gleaning the leftovers after the minimart had already been looted at least once.


6

A general term meaning looking for food, without the specifics of a location, would be foraging. Foraging: (of a person or animal) search widely for food or provisions.


6

Looting is often used to describe this in everyday usage, for example when people break into shops during a riot. It's often also used in post-apocalyptic fiction for the same thing too.


7

They could also scour a site for supplies, although this is a less-common word than scavenging or scrounging.


96

The word you are looking for is scavenging To collect by searching through refuse To search through (a place or container) for useful items.


1

The answer to the reporter's question was not up-to-date. American Heritage Dictionary Informed of or reflecting the latest information or changes: an up-to-date timetable.


1

"Fully" works best of the options. "Sufficiently" doesn't need the word "enough". If it is sufficient then that means "good enough", so "sufficiently enough" sounds odd. You could say "...not sufficiently answerered." "Completely" tends not to be gradable. You are unlikely to say "...


37

It sounds like you're looking for scrounging To forage about in an effort to acquire something at no cost So you could write scrounging for leftovers in a destroyed minimart in a zombie infested world


0

I can't imagine much use of such a word, as these expressions don't share any common grammar or meaning. In a discussion of language I'd just say ... expressions like "Happy birthday" or "Merry Christmas" ... But as these don't share any particular grammatical category, I'm not sure exactly what expressions you are including: Is "...


2

In your example you are abstracting your telescope to include properties of the telescope. Which is fine for most situations. Your first sentence sounds fine and will be understood in most situations. Saying your telescope is more precise, however, leaves your statement open to interpretation. Is it more precise in that you have more control over its ...


2

They are commonly called "greetings", or perhaps "seasonal greetings". In American English, it is more common to refer to Christmas, Easter etc as "holidays", so "holiday greetings" would also fit (this is not so common in British English where we use 'holiday' to mean vacation). Birthdays may not be a 'holiday' as ...


2

They are simply "rolling". To "roll over" is a phrasal verb that includes a resulting state, over, which means to be inverted after rolling. (Of course, rolling over twice means that you return to your original, uninverted state. You could also say of the children that they are rolling over again and again, but just rolling describes what ...


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