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2 votes

Is there any equivalent of "non-fiction writer/writing" that doesn't rely on a negative?

The term is "non-fiction" You can use this in a positive sense. "He writes non-fiction" This is a positive sentence, and doesn't mean "He doesn't write fiction". ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
0 votes

Can you say "added things" in one word?

"Extras" could also work well, given your desire to emphasize "adding".
chris barthelmas's user avatar
1 vote

What does a history teacher at school ask a student to prepare by the next lesson? A report, a paper, a presentation or what?

Depends on what the teacher wants. If she wants a written report, then "report". If she wants the student to make a presentation to the class then "presentation". She might also ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
2 votes

A word to describe somebody who farts all the time

The term fart is a flexible one. It can be a verb, Who farted? It can be a noun, they bought a fart bomb while the noun phrase an old fart, is used for people more advanced in their years. The ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
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2 votes

A word to describe somebody who farts all the time

The adjective to describe a person with such a condition is flatulent: ADJECTIVE suffering from or caused by an excessive amount of gas in the alimentary canal, producing uncomfortable distension ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
2 votes

Can a doula be a male? If not, what is the male equivalent of it?

First off, this is a pretty rare word. I had to look up its meaning, and visit a the natural childbirth trust website to understand how it differed from "midwife" (another word that that ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
5 votes

What crime does an accessory commit?

An "accessory" is someone who helps someone else commit a crime. So if you murder someone by poisoning him, and I gave you the poison and told you how to use it, then I am an "accessory&...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.8k
0 votes

Do you say "half boarding school"?

My answer is for American English, a country where boarding schools are rare. A boarding school is a school where there are students who live on the campus, including overnights. Usually not all the ...
Karen's user avatar
  • 1,435
-1 votes

Is this a school badge?

From www.oed.com Badge 1526 – In extended use: any physical object or mark which is used or regarded as a distinguishing sign, emblem, token, or symbol. In which sense a school logo, however it is ...
user2525621's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What's the ordinary equivalent of "parked cattywampus"?

Collins defines catawampus (US, dialectal) variously as askew; awry and going badly, awkwardly, or in the wrong direction. But in OP's specific context, I suggest higgledy-piggledy (mixed up and in ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
1 vote

Is it correct to say "I was taking a photo of my son when my daughter got in the camera's view"?

If you're explaining to someone, after the fact, that one of your children either made it impossible to take a snapshot, or somehow ruined it: As I was taking the picture, my son | daughter got in ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
1 vote

What word would you use to describe this figure: "20 per 1000 people"? A proportion?

I do not think there is a good word for this. I think it sounds much more natural to avoid the term and say: Twenty of every thousand people in this city are artists. Or, There are 20 artists for ...
lvnsn's user avatar
  • 76
0 votes
Accepted

Word for Like-begging person

Like Whore Someone who pretty much begs for attention by posting Facebook statuses that appeal to as many people as possible for the sole purpose for getting a million "Likes." Like Whore
digimunk's user avatar
  • 215
0 votes

Is this a school badge?

That shirt has a badge or logo printed on it, as opposed to being sewn onto it. Like this: printed badges or logos
Lambie's user avatar
  • 45.7k
0 votes

Is it natural to say "you don't want me to lose face, do you?" in this situation?

I find what you want in Oxford Dictionary lose face ​to be less respected or look stupid because of something you have done Many leaders don't want to lose face by admitting failures. Here is the link ...
EvanNguyen's user avatar
6 votes

Is this a school badge?

I would definitely call this a badge. Chambers has "badge: 1 .A mark or emblem showing rank, membership of a society, etc.". A badge does not need to be a separate object, although the word ...
timchessish's user avatar
  • 1,891
0 votes

Is it natural to say "you don't want me to lose face, do you?" in this situation?

By "natural" If you mean "is this how the native American/British/Australian/(insert some western country here) would say it?" then no If you mean "is this how an English ...
Raestloz's user avatar
  • 431
19 votes

Is this a school badge?

A 'badge', typically, is something that can be attached to something else - for example, the badge on the front of a vehicle which displays the manufacturer's emblem is often a removable/replaceable ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
2 votes

What word would you use to describe this figure: "20 per 1000 people"? A proportion?

"The number of artists in this city is 20 per 1000 people." 1 artist per 50 persons is a rate. Other examples of rates are literacy rates exchange rates speeds. Here, the relative ...
ryang's user avatar
  • 272
1 vote

Is this a school badge?

I'd call that an insignia. Cambridge: an object or mark that shows that a person belongs to a particular organization or group, or has a particular rank.
the-baby-is-you's user avatar
22 votes

Is this a school badge?

You'd probably get away with "badge", since that is clearly intended to be a cheap alternative to a sewn-on badge. The word "badge" is used for marks and tokens (worn on clothing) ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
3 votes

What word would you use to describe this figure: "20 per 1000 people"? A proportion?

This phrase can also be described as a ratio. A ratio is a quantitative relation between two numbers that represent how many times one number goes into the other. A ratio is formatted as follows, 20:...
ethan lamb's user avatar
0 votes

Is it natural to say "you don't want me to lose face, do you?" in this situation?

A couple of alternatives would be... You don't want to let us down, do you? We will be disappointed if you don't pass your exam. Whatever happens, we still love you. But we expect you to pass.
ethan lamb's user avatar
2 votes

What word would you use to describe this figure: "20 per 1000 people"? A proportion?

As @TimR has confirmed, "proportion" really is the best choice for a word that describes the concept X per Y people (where X and Y are numbers) in a general context. It is probably the best ...
Quack E. Duck's user avatar
1 vote

Is it natural to say "you don't want me to lose face, do you?" in this situation?

An alternative might be Please don't let us down. Cambridge Dictionary has let someone down to disappoint someone by failing to do what you agreed to do or were expected to do You will be there ...
Weather Vane's user avatar
  • 16.6k
4 votes

What word would you use to describe this figure: "20 per 1000 people"? A proportion?

In chemistry and biology specifically, standard abbreviations are ppm (parts-per-million) and ppb (parts-per-billion). Parts-per-thousand has a special word "permille" and symbol ‰, but ...
qwr's user avatar
  • 141
2 votes

Is it natural to say "you don't want me to lose face, do you?" in this situation?

The former, a negative question about a positive proposition, is perfectly fine. The latter, a positive question about a negative proposition, has a somewhat accusatory tone. That’s because in each of ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
6 votes

What word would you use to describe this figure: "20 per 1000 people"? A proportion?

There you are expressing a proportion. A proportion is "the relation of one part to another or to the whole with respect to magnitude, quantity, or degree". Here we are speaking of "...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
2 votes

Is it correct to say "the hem came unsewn"?

The idiomatic standard is... The hem came undone (about a dozen hits in Google Books) Note that although it will obviously be understood, Google Books reports no hits at all for the highlighted 3-...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
0 votes

What does "a cat is crawling" mean?

It depends on exactly what you're trying to describe. When cats stalk their prey, they do in fact move with their bellies closer to the ground compared to their regular walk. If you said a cat stalked ...
Weiwen Ng's user avatar
  • 179
4 votes
Accepted

What does "a cat is crawling" mean?

A bee is an insect, a lizard is a reptile (which you could have looked up for yourself). We often describe such creatures as 'crawling' rather than 'walking' simply because their bodies are close to ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 55.6k
1 vote

What does "a cat is crawling" mean?

Depending on context this could also be referring to a bulldozer, which are often referred to as a "cat" — short for Caterpillar, one of the major brands, regardless of manufacturer. I (a ...
SoronelHaetir's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Is it correct to say "the hem came unsewn"?

You can say "came unsewn." It is idiomatic and well attested. The hem of her long dress came unsewn as soon as they got out of the station.
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
1 vote

What does "a cat is crawling" mean?

A cat crawling usually means the cat is actually moving slowly (intransitive verb) To move slowly on the hands and knees or by dragging the body along the ground; creep. (intransitive verb) To ...
Amirreza's user avatar
  • 167
-3 votes

Is it correct to say "the hem came unsewn"?

The other two sentences are correct. But this one sounds wrong the hem came unsewn If you really must use this construct then it should be the hem became unsewn
Rohit Gupta's user avatar
0 votes

Looking for words related to serial publication

Novels that are published serially are called "serialized novels". You will find "serialized novel" (or serialised) well-attested in Google Books. It's a term of art used in lit-...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
1 vote

Intuitive relation between "range" and "group" in a hierachy

I would suggest tier with a number inasmuch as it is extensible: your hierarchy may grow in either direction, becoming more refined at the tips and more abstract tending towards monadic at the other ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
2 votes
Accepted

Intuitive relation between "range" and "group" in a hierachy

I don't see these terms as being related in a hierarchy. There is no sense in which "group" is a collection of "areas". A range normally has a start and end, and includes the ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
7 votes

Looking for words related to serial publication

These are relatively rare situations, and so don't be surprised that you need several words. I'd say that he "had a novel serialized" in the New Yorker. And if, for some reason, it isn't ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
2 votes

Do you say "he makes money selling saliva" to mean he makes money out of his talking skills?

Unlike some other proverbs and idioms, this one doesn't translate well. In English, saliva is not particular associated with talking. It is associated with eating "He salivated at the sight of ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
3 votes
Accepted

Does it make sense to say to a person "you're good to go" when he is done with something?

That's fine. It's a typical casual expression so I don't want to over-analyse. It means that she isn't prepared or ready to go play until she has finished her maths lesson - that finishing maths is ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
1 vote
Accepted

what does "recess" or "break" mean when it is uncountable and when it is countable?

"Recess" and "break" are unusual words in that both can be used as either countable or uncountable pretty freely. "I am on break." Not countable. "I am on a break.&...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.8k
1 vote
Accepted

Is there another way to say instead of saying "make me"?

Sure. "Make me" means, "You have ordered me to do X. I don't believe you have the power to force me to do it. So I defy you to force me." It is informal. In a more formal setting, ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.8k
1 vote

what does "recess" or "break" mean when it is uncountable and when it is countable?

"You can do it during break/recess or during your lunch break," is perfectly acceptable. One could also use, "lunch breaks." Neither is better than the other. English is flexible ...
DrMoishe Pippik's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

How to express a door opens / closes at different ranges?

The only idioms are "crack" and "wide" You can open the door a crack, or you can crack a door open. In both cases it means that the door only slightly open. You can also use this ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
-1 votes

Is the child that is not adopted your 'blood child'?

I despise the word step child ..we use bonus child in our family but never ever ever in front of child, we say our grands..:: we have 10 …6 boys and 5 girls, if asked to explain who is whose than if ...
Deidre Norman's user avatar
3 votes

Do you have idioms with "as simple as ..."?

Sure, one can make a distinction between "easy" and "simple". Like I've often said that losing weight is simple: eat less and exercise more. Is that easy? No. Is it simple? Yes. ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.8k
41 votes
Accepted

Is it idiomatic to say "I have to race with time" to mean I have to do a thing very fast and finish it before something bad might happen?

The idiomatic expression is "race against time". To race with something or somebody can also mean you are competing against them, so arguably it does mean the same thing. But idioms are ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
2 votes

Is it idiomatic to say "I have to race with time" to mean I have to do a thing very fast and finish it before something bad might happen?

"I have to race with time" is not idiomatic, but here are some options that are: I have to race the clock. I have to beat the clock. I have to beat my record. I have to beat my best time....
Friendly Racoon's user avatar

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