New answers tagged

1

coddle Merriam-Webster defines it: **2 : *to treat with extreme or excessive care or kindness It's usually a negative expression that means to be too kind to someone who either doesn't need it or is being harmed by it. If can also refer to extreme kindness towards something that really needs the care, or isn't going to be harmed by it, like a newborn baby, ...


1

If we wish to say that person A always indulges person B and invariably forgives their transgressions, we can say that person A lets person B get away with murder. get away with murder PHRASE If you say that someone gets away with murder, you are complaining that they can do whatever they like without anyone trying to control them or punish them. [informal, ...


3

Such a person is often called a "point of contact". If you want to emphasize that this POC is only for external relations, then I can't think of a better way of saying that except explicitly, e.g.: He/she is our point of contact for external (or in this case perhaps "interdepartmental") relations.


1

I would tend to call that person the "public face", whether of a department or an entire company. I believe this usage is fairly recent however (as in the last decade or two).


1

The discussion in comments pointed me to the word decent: conforming to standards of propriety, good taste, or morality While still a rather positively-loaded word, it doesn't have the same implications of approval as wholesome or healthy - with those words, there's a heavy implication that the lack of alcohol and flirting is the right way to do things, ...


2

wholesome As FumbleFingers said in a comment above: Healthy sounds to me like a rather tub-thumpingly "loaded" term for the intended sense here. For no reason I can put my finger on, near-synonymous wholesome company / venues / pursuits / friends seems a much better choice. Perhaps it's just that wholesome is more often used "semi-...


0

I have chosen "naturalistic drawing".


4

In New York at least, we'd often call such a person a "schlemiel". If that doesn't work for you, then I'd recommend a thesaurus, as Ethan Bolker suggested. E.g., there are plenty of synonyms here: https://www.merriam-webster.com/thesaurus/schlemiel


1

"All thumbs" might do for physical ineptitude. Not so much for "making money or dealing with the unprecedented. https://www.dictionary.com/browse/all--thumbs


0

Frankly, the clearest thing to say would be "underside of the bed". There are different types of beds that have different types of "undersides". A "platform bed" is one that has some sort of flat surface or frame that you can rest the mattress on directly. A "frame bed" has a rectangular frame that you sit a boxspring ...


1

It might be a bed frame, bedboard or box springs. An image search will quickly show you which best describes that particular bed.


0

One way to describe that is an ad hominem fallacy, literally, at attack “at the person” instead of addressing the real topic. Less formally, it’s name-calling. I wouldn’t call that “jargon.” That usually means vocabulary that only a particular community of people will understand.


2

A "careers adviser" would be my preferred term. Student counsellors give advice on student wellbeing (such as dealing with anxiety). "Study counsellor" is not a term I recognise. I see it used mostly on Scandinavian websites as a synonym for "student counsellor" However "Careers adviser" is recognised job. They give ...


1

The word I am used to seeing in this circumstance is 'voiced., as in "Is the letter 't' voiced?" ('sounded' comes off very odd to me - used to western US English).


0

"Drown" or "Drown out" His voice was drowned out by the roar of the traffic.


2

"Pronounced" is fine or "sounded", "said" or "vocalised" are also possible. In your context Is the letter 't' silent? Is still the best sentence, but you could have asked Is the letter 't' sounded? / Do you pronounce the 't'? / How is the 't' pronounced in your name? / How do you say your name?


1

An appropriate single word simply won't be found. The closest you might come would be "manna from Heaven" but that refers to food alone; nothing else. It might help if you could clarify the contrast between "… the word 'gift' isn't listed in my bilingual dictionary…" and "I looked up the word in my bilingual dictionary and the ...


0

I finally figured it out (some time ago, but I doubt anyone will need it...): a ranking. Rankings, while not a mathematical term, imply both a complete linear order and uniqueness of elements.


-2

It's hyperstimulation anxiety. I've had it my entire life, and it's awful. Anxiety medication helps a lot. You'll need to go to the doctor and be put on anxiety medication but it will help with these "panic attacks". Hyperstimulation anxiety is horrible to live with. But medication helps. Don't suffer, see a doctor.


6

One could perhaps use grace here; after all, etymologically it is something to be grateful for. As Merriam-Webster puts it, it is an "unmerited divine assistance given to humans for their regeneration or sanctification". Hey! You should be grateful for the grace bestowed upon you! Some people were born with blind eyes. OK, "bestowed" is ...


1

In Russian, the "подъезд" (or how they say in Saint-Petersburg, "парадное"), can have two different meanings, depending on the context: It may mean "an entrance", i.e. the entryway into the building. It may be the entrance to any large building, not necessarily into multi-apartment residential complex (project). Usually, it is ...


2

While the word 'labour' ('labor' in the USA) can mean heavy manual work, the term 'labour market' in economics (otherwise 'job market') refers to the supply of, and often the demand for, all types of paid employment, as any easily available economics reference or dictionary will show. – What Is the Labor Market? The labor market, also known as the job ...


3

As you noted, "to back off" is a verb, distinct from its component parts which may be prepositions or adverbs. Using the structure you are looking at, the correct phrase is "I waved the car back" without including "off". If you wish to use the exact phrase "back off", you will need to change the structure and add some ...


9

Gift is certainly used in this context - indeed, there is a cliche, a "god-given gift". Or "He thinks he's god's gift to women". But blessing also seems natural and fine in your context, if perhaps a little old fashioned.


3

As someone who worked in the construction industry, municipal building inspections and as a former architecture student in the US, I am not aware of any common used term to describe the part of the structure you are describing. I have never seen that part of the structure called out in building plans (blueprints) nor have I seen it specifically cited in ...


6

In the semantical sense "entrance" is the closest word to 'подъезд'. User PCARR also mentioned "entryway" in his/her comments, which is similar. There is no exact equivalent in English, because the word 'подъезд' was probably derived from the verb "подъезжать" (~ approach by car (example)). I believe the problem is not with the ...


2

Grammatically the sentence is fine, but I think that many English speakers would find it a bit strange for two reasons: Saying that something is "just" somewhere often implies that if you go a little further, then you will encounter it. That is why when an infant crawls toward his mother, you can say, "You're almost there . . . Go just a ...


2

The expression for not having the courage to do something daunting is I haven't the guts to... However, this isn't appropriate for the situation you describe. The woman might say I haven't the heart to go travelling with you. ('Go out' suggests going on a date or attending a social event rather than travelling.)


3

It’s a nice sentence. It’s not what you would usually hear, but it’s nice. English language isn’t fixed. This is just the right distance from standard English to be interesting. Now what exactly “long on temper” means is tricky to say. “Short on temper” is someone who gets annoyed very easily and quickly. So “long on temper” might be someone who takes a very ...


3

Definition 8 at Lexico provides the meaning of the idiom "long on": informal Well supplied with. So "long on temper" means she has a strong temper. "Short on" is the opposite, so "short on patience" means she doesn't have much matience. The relevant definition of "complicated" is: Involving many different ...


0

I think it will be less ambiguous if you say: "She is big on temper but short on patience." long does not clarify whether she takes long to be angry or whether she stays angry for a long time. Most people might understand the former meaning than the latter. "Big on temper" makes more sense as being Big on something is the general usage ...


0

Use of 'long' and 'short' here make me think of financial trading, where to be 'long' on a commodity means to have a financial situation where you will profit if the price goes up (e.g. by owning some of it), or maybe just to believe that it's valuable and to be 'short' means to have the opposite situation, where you will profit if the price goes down, or ...


8

I've never heard of a long-tempered person. You could say quick-tempered, high-tempered, or simply 'she's got a temper' (insinuating the same thing) but 'long on temper' doesn't sound right to me. As for a complicated person; that's a correct way to describe someone. The reason it's not in the dictionary is because 'complicated' has a generic meaning, and ...


1

I believe the word you're looking for is "foyer". This is usually an entrance to a set of apartments. Sometimes when multiple apartment buildings are linked, as the ones in the picture, they have multiple foyers. If you were to give directions to Misha's place it would be: "In the second foyer, on the third floor, is Misha's place."


3

The character in the clip says two things: itty-bitty eensy-weensy There are many other terms that could be used, for example: teeny-weeny itsy-bitsy The term for this formation in general is reduplication, as described in this answer to the question What is the "peasy" in "easy-peasy"?


0

I don't know if there is an exact word translation but it may be "unit". I think if I was trying to convey the same concept you're saying in English there's 2 ways I could go: "Misha lives [on the 3rd floor] in the 2nd unit of our building." Or "Misha lives in the 2nd building of our complex." At least in America, I think would ...


8

It's fine to say a person is complicated. For your second sentence it might make as much sense to say She's long on temper and short on patience. since you'd expect someone with a temper to be impatient.


9

I would suggest entranceway or entryway as suitable. According to wikidiff.com, there is a small difference as nouns between entryway and entranceway. "Entryway is an opening to a hallway allowing entry into a structure and entranceway is something that provides access to an entrance; an entryway".


18

In England people would generally use the word staircase. This is grammatically slightly different because you can't say "I live in the second staircase", you would have to say "I live in a flat off the second staircase". A more general term would be section. "I live in the second section of the apartment block" does not convey ...


0

My guess is that "on here" is grammatical but less useful to indicate where a small object is. If a toy is on top of a box, it is probably visible, so one can simply point to the toy and say "it is here". Whereas if the toy is inside the box, it may not be visible, so one would point at the box and say "it is in here". Like @...


8

I don't believe there is a commonly used word for this specific arrangement in American English. If the separate units were single-family homes we would call them terraced houses (UK) or townhouses/rowhouses (US)—and it is true that in many cities such houses have been later subdivided so each house contains multiple apartments. But I don't think the term ...


9

In British English, in Scotland at least, I believe the word "close" can refer to exactly what you describe. It is an entrance to a multilevel building just like your picture or, more traditionally, to a tenement. It is pronounced with a soft "s", in the same way as when saying "close by" or "close at hand". So, when I ...


2

In US English that is the name of the degree I have never heard it called the "specification". When a degree is abbreviated, the abbreviation always indicates the type and level of the degree in my experience. One might call it the type of degree. Some examples: BA = Bachelor of Arts BS = Bachelor of Science BN = Bachelor of Nursing MB = Bachelor ...


1

It's a rather blurry distinction between the two, and they're often used interchangeably. Appraisal is usually used in the sense of "evaluation" or more broadly determining how much something is worth and how good it is, while review usually implies making sure something meets some particular standards and trying to find areas for improvement. But ...


2

multidimensional (in the UK) is generally applied to abstract nouns like space, networks and issues rather than to people. multifaceted is more commonly used to describe someone's character, personality or career than to describe the person. Ngram single-faceted (person) seems to be a rarity. one-dimensional, which is often applied to poorly-written ...


2

It's okay if it's not the word you're looking for, but "reminiscing" is not too formal for everyday speech (at least, not mine!). It's a great choice because it has exactly the meaning you're looking for—dwelling on memories of the past, with a specifically positive connotation. Some other good options would be to use broader words: I'm thinking ...


4

Yes, you're right that a direct translation of "decision guidance documents" is not the best choice. It is certainly to-the-point, but since it's not an established or familiar phrase, its meaning isn't immediately obvious. Unfortunately this is one of the many times that the best translation must do some rewording, rather than be very word-for-...


3

For the sake of precision we must remember that the sea-witch transformed the mermaid. The mermaid desired to be transformed but the mermaid did not transform herself. The mermaid has not only transformed (i.e. changed shape) but she has been transformed (i.e. had her shape changed by something else). If you are speaking in context and we as your listeners ...


1

I see one significant problem. For some objects, "face-up" has a clear and determined meaning—playing cards, for instance. But unless there's a regional usage that makes it clear to you but not to me, I don't know that it's a given that the yogurt-y side of the "lid" is the "face," so "face-up" could mean either ...


3

Blow-drying requires a rather sophisticated hair dryer and skill. It's often used by hairdressers to add volume and body to hair. The skill lies in making hair look smooth, shiny and soft to the touch. It needs practice, time, and a certain hand-dexterity to achieve the same results at home but it can be done. She blow-dried her hair until it looked as ...


Top 50 recent answers are included