77

The has two pronunciations: "thuh" /ðə/ and "thee" /ði/. While in a few dialects the rules are less well-defined, in most British and American dialects you say "thuh" when it precedes a consonant sound. The(thuh) person /ðə pɜ:sən/ The(thuh) university /ðə ju:nɪvɜ:sɪti/ But you say "thee" when it precedes a vowel. The(thee) apple /ði æpl/ The(thee) ...


9

Since width and breadth derive from wide and broad we can look at these words for more clarification. From Merriam Webster: Synonym Discussion of BROAD broad, wide, deep mean having horizontal extent. Broad and wide apply to a surface measured or viewed from side to side < a broad avenue >. Wide is more common when units of measurement are mentioned &...


8

Just to add a little bit to the very good accepted answer: In addition to the two distinctions already noted, there is at least one other situation in which native (at least American English) speakers will often use the stressed pronunciation. In speech, when we are not sure what we are going to say next, most often we will use the stressed pronunciation: ...


6

When the preposition in a phrasal verb has no noun complement afterwards it is usually stressed: Take off the jumper Take the jumper off Take off For this reason all the instances of back in the Original Poster's example will probably be stressed. As the Original Poster has indicated lexical verbs will usually also take stress, but auxiliaries usually won'...


5

Your explanation is a bit confusing to me, but it's like this: It was awful. Emphasizing that we are talking about it opposed to something else. It was awful. Emphasizing that it was awful, but implying that it is no longer awful. Or, this says it was awful despite some reservations. It was awful. (Stress on "aw") Emphasizing that it was awful ...


5

It all depends on the context and exactly what you're trying to communicate: I'm proud of you, Hannah! (others may be proud of you, but I want you to know that I am, too) I'm proud of you, Hannah! (not disappointed in you, as you might be thinking) I'm proud of you, Hannah! (others may have done well, but I want you to know particularly how I ...


4

Yes, that's correct. You would only stress "some" if it was the most important part of the question - "Do you want some coffee or a lot of coffee? In that case, "coffee" would be unstressed.


4

The best answer is, "However Fatima wants her name pronounced". One of the many challenges living in American multiculturalism is the extreme diversity of names, from every country on Earth. If you're the kind of American who cares about such things (which is not every American, but that's off-topic) you learn to pronounce these names as they would be ...


4

English rarely uses accent marks; it’s not even unusual to see resume or canape where résumé or canapé is intended. For the most part, the stressed syllable is determined by context, rather than orthography.


4

This is an example of tmesis, and it is widely used in English. Example: That play last night was un-freakin'-believable. Note that this is often a colloquial usage, but even the best writers have used it from time to time and it doesn't have to be vulgar. Example from Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet: “This is not Romeo, he's some other where.” An ...


3

Both are correct but have different meaning: Make the choice of wisdom: This describes someone who has decided to follow a path (or life) of wisdom. Make the choice with wisdom: This describes someone who is using wisdom to help them when making a specific choice.


3

It's always pronounced forward, regardless of how it's used.


3

Yes. With no special stress, the word "sleep" would carry the most emphasis. "Some" would be entirely unstressed. A more visual representation might be: GET some SLEEP.


3

I am a native British English speaker who has worked in an engineering environment in the US. I do not recall these numbers being pronounced differently between continents. I would say: 0.1 Oh point one -or- one tenth 0.24 Oh point two four 1 4/5 One and four fifths (However I'm prepared to be corrected by other engineers with multinational ...


3

That is used for defining clauses (needed to provide meaning to the sentence), which is used for non-defining clauses (additional meaning to the sentence). Example: Which fork did you use? I used the one that was in the drawer. Did you use a spoon or fork? I used the fork, which was a poor choice.


2

To answer your questions simply: the h can be silent, and generally is in casual English when pronouncing words that begin with wh- such as what, where and whip. In casual conversation, the h of his can become very subtle, but full omission of the h pushes this from proper English to regional dialect. When I say, "What's his name?" the h is subtle and ...


2

Short answer: /tel e phon ing/. Slightly longer answer: primary stress goes on /tel/, and there is secondary stress on /phon/. Contextual addendum: /telephoning/ is not used in conversation, in my experience: /phoning/ is used instead. (I'd give you the IPA transcription, but I'm not sure whether it would render properly here)


2

The emphasis indicates the crucial part of the sentence. You could put the emphasis in lots of different places, depending on what you want to .... emphasize. I'm sort of busy right now" I am busy, but perhaps I know of another person who could help you. I'm sort of busy right now. I am a little bit busy, but I might be able to help you if it won't ...


2

One is about practical physical measurement, as in: 'the tailor would measure the width of a piece of cloth'. And the breadth is a figurative speech meaning like: 'I searched the length and breadth of this place for that missing pen'.


2

Since they both indicate some form of measurement, let us first contrast both words with length. So imagine a square. In this case, width, breadth and length are all equal and are pretty interchangeable (i.e. synonymous). Now imagine a rectangle. Typically length is used to describe the "longest" side and the "shorter side" can be described as the breadth ...


2

According to Cambridge English Pronunciation Dictionary, this three-syllable word is always stressed on the first syllable (FA.) in British English, but in American English, it can be stressed on either the first (FA.) or the second (TI.) syllable.


2

Executive is pronounced exECutive. This is a noun that typically means a high-ranking person in a company, or something that facilitates execution. You can't pronounce this exeCUTive. Execute and related forms are pronounced exeCUTE, e.g. execUTEd, exeCUTing, exeCUTion and cannot be pronouned with the stress elsewhere. Executable is derived from execute, ...


2

/ˈgɛʔ sm ˈsli:p/ Determiners Most determiners don't usually take stress in normal, unmarked speech. For example, the articles a and the are very rarely stressed. The same is true of the indefinite determiners some and any. Many words in determinative function do take stress though. One example is numbers. So in the phrase: Two sugars, please both two and ...


2

Indeed, without special emphasis determiners are normally not stressed. The word some is an indefinite determiner here. In terms of stress, sleep would normally get the primary stress and get the secondary stress. This means that sleep will be stressed slightly more than get.


2

That website is mistaken, or rather it's giving a simplified explanation that will mislead you in many cases. As ssav pointed out, there are tons of counterexamples to that rule when it's stated as a universal principle. Some of these counterexamples follow patterns of their own which you may be able to learn; others are unpredictable violations that pretty ...


2

I mean do we say **"Where'd you get this?"** or we say **"Where d'you get this?"**. There is a time difference between the two: Where'd you get this? is past tense, and means "Where did you get this." Where d'you get this? is present tense, and means "Where do you get this?"


1

You have written every word correctly, good job! But the way you wrote it does sound strange. I listened to video clip and I would transcribe it like this: You then wanna formulate an action plan: what steps can you take to start to address your worry? And I guarantee you that as soon as you start to get into action around what you are worried about, you ...


1

There is practically no rule in English that doesn't have an exception. Here are a few more: Rebuttal Universal Accidental Infernal Horizontal Fraternal The reason why probably relates to where the words come from - Latin vs Greek vs Germanic root words - but I don't know enough linguistics to explain it fully.


1

The stress in that sentence is very ambiguous. You could stress any word in that sentence and it would be perfectly fine. It wouldn't even necessarily change the meaning. But that being said, here's how I would break it down: Could you come with me, please? I'm addressing an individual out of a group, and I want to emphasize that only the individual, not ...


1

You can stress any word, and it will give a slightly different meaning on what you're saying. The most natural stress for example one is on the word travel, and for number two it's accountant. I'm going to list out the different stresses for the first example, then tell you what they mean: He wants a job that lets them travel. (For these examples, I'll ...


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