38

"Senior member" is the better choice, unless you're deliberately using it in a joking way. Although it's technically true that the user's account is older than yours, "elder" is generally used in a more narrow sense to describe someone's actual, real-life age, while "senior" is much more commonly used in this context and doesn't ...


30

Given that a young member could have been here for longer than an older person, or someone might have been here for a long time but not achieved many privileges, I suggest long-standing member. This has no implications of age, superiority or of anything else except purely the time they have been on the site.


12

The translation might be wrong. The corresponding German phrase is holte die Rechte wieder ein which I would translate as 'caught up with the right (hand) again'. 'holte ... ein' is from the verb einholen, which can indeed mean 'to bring in something' but in this case it's definitely the other meaning. to catch up to to reel (source: Wiktionary)


10

In music, we sometimes refer to players as “coming in” when they join others already playing. For instance, a piece may start with just violins and then the trumpets “come in”. The conductor motioning for the trumpets to start could be said to “bring in” the trumpets. A piano is played with two hands, so one hand could be said to “come in” or the player ...


8

A person might be in their twenties but be a member of a Stack exchange site for as many as 8 years. In that case, elder or senior member sounds a bit of a misnomer. I prefer veteran user (a person who has had long experience in a particular field.) hi-rep user (only applicable if the user does indeed have >5K or if the site is large >10K in ...


6

(See Edit section at the bottom as well.) For your situation, senior member is correct and is much better than elder member. If senior is used like an adjective, in situations like this, it usually means that someone has been with the company/site longer, that they have a higher rank, or something else like that. This includes someone who has been using SE ...


4

You are correct that "rent" normally refers to the payment and "rental" to the space that is rented. I need to find a new rental / rental unit / apartment to rent / place to rent / place to live. The (monthly) rent for the room is $300. A dialogue example: "I need to find a new place to rent. How much is the rent for your room/...


2

Realistically, both elder and senior are going to bother someone, eventually, as ageism. Even "long-time" has that feel to it. I try to pick something that's inherently a compliment to them instead. I personally like more tongue in cheek descriptions like superior, ranking, eminent, ascendent, or tenured. Tenured Member is hard for an ...


2

Personally, I'd assume "elder member" was meant in the same context as "elder statesman" Collins: An experienced and respected member of an organization or profession is sometimes referred to as an elder statesman I certainly wouldn't take it as referring to somebody as elderly, or in any way offensively. That said, I can see how some ...


1

No, you can't. When you use "tell somebody something" you are expressing indirect speech and the something should normally be a complete sentence. For example, I told you I would be on time. I told you tea culture is important in Japan. When you tell somebody about <something>, the <something> can be just a noun phrase, as in your ...


1

The way you put it, "it broke me", is fine. I looked for the phrase at Google books, and all but one of the hits on the first page had the sense you are looking for (that it caused me severe emotional damage): Google books "it broke me"


1

Neither "by its surface" or "by its side" mean what you show in the pictures. There are special words for the parts of cardboard, but they are not in general use. So most people would just say "rip up the cardboard" and allow the context to describe the actual process. You could say something like: You can't tear it in half, ...


1

Any of these are valid constructions, but they mean different things. To swing would imply that the child is moving back and forth. To hang implies that they are just holding still. To dangle often implies that the thing is not very securely attached, or in a dangerous or temporary situation, so it's probably the least likely word one would use here. "...


1

I need to find new accommodation For the room, I need to pay monthly rent An alternative for the former, depending on country and age, might be digs. A rental car, property etc. is one you possess by means of paying rent (the manner of 'ownership' / residence).


1

How will we handle one-on-one instruction while social distancing? This sentence uses "social distance" as a verb, which is a neologism, a new usage. It is awkward, and probably best avoided. A more usual construction would be "while distancing socially". The phrases "social distance" and "social distancing" appear in ...


1

You can assuage a feeling, pain, or desire; you can soothe these things, and also soothe a person. You cannot assuage a person. Assuage Soothe


1

First example: Tom is very extroverted and confident while Katy's shy and quiet. This example is clear and natural. However, if your intended meaning of "while" is equivalent to another conjunction like "but" or "yet", I think it is clearer to use the alternative conjunction, since "while" also has a temporal ...


1

I wouldn't describe it as either an imaginary or virtual person. Given that Rachel is an adult, that would give the impression that you think she’s a bit off mentally. All she's doing here in this scene is practicing what she's going to say when the guy she's interested in shows up. It's a very common trope in sitcoms and dramas; it's a way of letting the ...


1

The use of "this one" here is correct and idiomatic in American English, indicating that the team will lose this game. If emphasis is placed on the phrase "this one", the speaker may also be implying that "this one" is an exception, and that the team will "win the next one", or has won most of their previous games. As @...


1

Common misuse In American English, the phrase "I guess" frequently does not have the same literal meaning as the verb "to guess", and so is often misused by nonnative English speakers. One example of this misuse can be found in this question about predicting sports outcomes. The OP wants to express that, though they are uncertain, they ...


1

In casual conversation, you can safely use these two phrases interchangeably. It's a very small nuance, but I generally use "that's true" when someone presents new information or ideas I hadn't previously considered, and "that's right" when someone reminds me of something I previously knew. I'm not sure this is an official rule of ...


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