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15 votes

Why isn't "meanwhile" advisable in this sentence? Doesn't it mean "at the same time"?

meanwhile is a rather simplistic narrative segue. It is used to say that one action was happening at the same time as another. The Lollipop Gang were sitting in the corner of the seedy bar, plotting ...
TimR's user avatar
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13 votes
Accepted

Why isn't "meanwhile" advisable in this sentence? Doesn't it mean "at the same time"?

“Meanwhile” is a filler-word here The use of “Meanwhile” doesn’t add anything to the sentence: it means “at the same time”, but when comparing figures from a single report like this it is a given that ...
KrisW's user avatar
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11 votes
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Is “stuff” used correctly in “ There are all kinds of animals: lions, elephants and stuff.”

People use stuff in pretty much whatever way they please. That said, it is used a lot. And yes, it is used correctly and idiomatically and colloquially in the sample sentence. Adults also use it: &...
Lambie's user avatar
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10 votes

Why isn't "meanwhile" advisable in this sentence? Doesn't it mean "at the same time"?

Speaking as someone who grew up in America and has been speaking English for 60 years ... I don't see anything wrong with the use of "meanwhile" here. It makes perfect sense in context. You'...
Jay's user avatar
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5 votes

Do you say "You got the floor muddy" the same way we say "get something wet / dirty"?

To make something muddy is to cause mud to form, as rain on bare earth does. To get something muddy is to cause (already existing) mud to stick to the thing or penetrate into it, as by treading in mud ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
5 votes

Why isn't "meanwhile" advisable in this sentence? Doesn't it mean "at the same time"?

Your use of the word "meanwhile" is certainly not incorrect. To a native English speaker, it might just feel a little out of place in your sentence. Since there doesn't seem to be a ...
Brendan Mitchell's user avatar
3 votes

Is “stuff” used correctly in “ There are all kinds of animals: lions, elephants and stuff.”

It is a very colloquial and rather sloppy use of stuff, but if you wanted to blend in with a group of pre-teen boys in the US, it's just the ticket: The zoo has all kinds of neat stuff to see, like ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 128k
2 votes

What does It refer to in 'It is as if nothing has changed.'

It is a pronoun and therefore refers back to a noun or idea earlier in the narrative. Sometimes that reference is clear, sometimes it's more fuzzy or ambiguous. Consider the following imaginary story. ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

When should I use "suited" instead of "suitable"?

Both can be used, and if there is a shade of difference, I think the difference lies in the results. When a body is used for some activity for which it is not suited, it suffers from such use; whereas ...
TimR's user avatar
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2 votes

Is “stuff” used correctly in “ There are all kinds of animals: lions, elephants and stuff.”

There are all kinds of animals: lions, elephants, giraffes etc. This use of etc. which arguably stands for "and other kinds of animals", is acceptable in informal writing and speech. I ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
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2 votes

Differences in Usage: 'Cellphone' vs. 'Mobile Phone' in English

USA and Canada: cell phone, cell, (cellies is a slang that is American, but never really used) UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, and Singapore: mobile phone, mobile, (Mobi is said to be an ...
Megas's user avatar
  • 105
2 votes

Why isn't "meanwhile" advisable in this sentence? Doesn't it mean "at the same time"?

Other answers give lots of details, but an important high-level point that should be said clearly: From an ELL point of view, your use of meanwhile is absolutely fine! Your example is completely ...
PLL's user avatar
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2 votes

Is it natural to say "you should've done the math exercise smartly"?

What you have found is a "shortcut". Or a "quick" way to do the problem. You might recommend that she should "work smarter, not harder" But that is clichéd. As usual, ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
2 votes

Is it natural to say "you should've done the math exercise smartly"?

Sorry, but no. "Smart" can mean "intelligent", but "smartly" means "stylishly", like, "Sally was very smartly dressed". Or it can mean "promptly&...
Jay's user avatar
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1 vote

Can "show" be replaced by "present"?

In most of the cases, you can interchangeably used them, even in the current case you can use present instead of show. The choice of either of them depends on the level of generality/formality of the ...
Naveed Ahmed's user avatar
1 vote

What does It refer to in 'It is as if nothing has changed.'

Let's approach the question by comparing two possibilities: Nothing has changed. It is as if nothing has changed. The first is a bald statement that there has been no change whatsoever. The second ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 128k
1 vote

Do you say "her carelessness leaked into her blood" to express that her carelessness is her essence or habit?

To say something is in [one's] blood is idiomatic. It suggests that something is part of your nature, something you were born with, perhaps an inherited skill or characteristic. Surfing is in his ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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1 vote

Is "metro" used in British English?

While "a metro" would be understood as a light, underground rail system for a city, it sounds odd to talk about the trains as "metros". However this exposes a linguistic gap in ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
1 vote
Accepted

Can we use “reverse sweep” in football?

It is not used in "football" (whether by "football" you mean "soccer" as in the UK, or "rugby" as in New Zealand, or "Gridiron" as in the USA, or &...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
1 vote

Do people in Sydney or even Australia say napkin, tissue, or serviette?

british-english Napkin and Serviette are one of the classic examples of U and non-U speech, as categorised in the 1950s, the hypothesis being that members of middle classes would adopt new terms like &...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
1 vote

Do you say "You got the floor muddy" the same way we say "get something wet / dirty"?

Yes. You got the floor muddy is absolutely normal and correct. Native speakers use it all the time. The relevant definition is 5c from Mirriam Webster: to cause to be in a certain position or ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
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1 vote

Can “cumbersome” be used for “watches”?

The dictionary gives two senses, neither of which fit well. "Large and heavy, difficult to move or carry" - Few would find it hard to lift a watch, so this isn't quite right. -- or -- &...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
1 vote

Why isn't "meanwhile" advisable in this sentence? Doesn't it mean "at the same time"?

I wouldn't actually say it's inadvisable. As others have said, it's mostly a filler word, which might easily be deleted: Education expenditure was highest in India at 15%, followed by 13% in Thailand....
nigel222's user avatar
  • 434
1 vote

Can “cumbersome” be used for “watches”?

The adjective phrase a bit cumbersome is object complement. It describes the gerund-participial phrase wearing a watch rather than the watch. cumbersome in American English (ˈkʌmbərsəm) ADJECTIVE 1. ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

Is “stuff” used correctly in “ There are all kinds of animals: lions, elephants and stuff.”

No, it is not. You should use 'and others' instead of 'and stuff'. Animals are living, stuff is inanimate.
RobFalla's user avatar
1 vote

Why isn't "meanwhile" advisable in this sentence? Doesn't it mean "at the same time"?

The term "meanwhile" is generally used with "action" verbs. The sentence could sensibly read, e.g. India spent 15% on education--the highest of any country--while Thailand spent ...
supercat's user avatar
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