13

In my experience, silverware is the most common term for metal eating utensils (forks, knives, spoons), though flatware is also perfectly acceptable. I've also heard and used cutlery to describe this set of items, though in the U.S., cutlery can also refer to kitchen knives of all kinds. Crockery is very common to refer to ceramic dish sets, also just ...


5

Regarding "the dishes": A dish, in my area of the USA is more often called "a plate". It is a flat, usually round thing made from plastic, glass, or ceramic that you put non-liquid food on and eat from. However, the dishes can either mean a collection of plates, (especially as compared to bowls, as in "put the dishes here and the bowls there"), but most ...


3

To be honest it does not really make any sense. It is a very complicated way to say something and the idiom is used incorrectly. The use of far behind is not needed. Your basic idea to use the arrival time comparison is correct The distance is irrelevant to the discussion. It would be easy to say Yesterday; we were still stuck in traffic at this time. She ...


3

I would say scavenging is better than looting or the other verbs proposed in the question, which usually mean that goods or possessions are stolen from shops and homes, i.e. they obviously belong to someone. However if the owners have left their belongings behind in a public place, I propose the Lexico definition of scavenge VERB 1.2 Search for ...


3

(a) The film was a real rubbish. NO (a) This car is a rubbish. NO (b) This car is a lemon YES The word rubbish is an uncountable noun, you cannot count "rubbish" individually. The correct way to state the OP's sample sentences would be This car is rubbish That film was rubbish That film was really rubbish Man, this job is rubbish. ...


2

Refer can be a direct reference; it has multiple meanings The verb refer has several meanings (or different shades of meaning). One of these is: refer to [somebody/something] -- phrasal verb B2 to talk or write about someone or something, especially in only a few words: In her autobiography she occasionally refers to her unhappy ...


2

"Just go through it once" sounds fine. "Just read it once" does not sound natural. It might be said, but there are other, likelier options. "Just give it a read" is definitely casual, but not necessarily too casual for a teacher to use with a student (that's really a question about teaching styles, more than language styles, but in short most American ...


2

Well, I have two suggestions: According to the Oxford Dictionary capture Take into one's possession or control by force. The island was captured by Australian forces in 1914 You can capture prisioners but you can also capture the equipment that the enemy has left in the battlefield. A quote from the book Daily Life in Civil War America The string ...


2

Looting fits perfectly. It happens during a violent event but does not necessarily involve violence. looting noun; Cambridge English Dictionary the activity of stealing from shops during a violent event: There were reports of widespread looting as hooligans stampeded through the city centre.


2

You're right, bathroom scales appear to be of a norm. I perceive from a quick search online it is a category to all if not most commercial stores when shopping for all scales. Even when not precisely located, it may still appropriately be called a bathroom scale. I believe in a culture differing from that of U.S. the combination of both these words, ...


2

For all of these examples except the fourth, I would choose victory. The reasons why are a little different for each, so I'll do my best to explain them individually. The differences between these words are few and relatively minor, but one to take note of is that a triumph is very explicitly made against something or someone in particular, whereas a victory ...


1

In this context, "rubbish" is strictly British. Along with "lorry", "flat", and "petrol", it's one of the common words that show up on lists of differences between the two countries, and how to immediately tell someone is likely to be from the UK (aside from the accent, of course). Americans do say "rubbish", but not normally as a metaphor for something of ...


1

You don't typically use the apostrophe-s possessive for complicated multi-word nouns. The way you would write it is: the food of the dog at the park or, in this case it would sound better to me as the food for the dog at the park Little kids and people in a hurry who are speaking casually to their friends might say something like the-dog-at-the-...


1

the term is response data. The data received as responses to a survey, for example. The data from the response is written as: response data. This is a common phenomenon in English. Results of the tests becomes: test results. These are not formal compound nouns. They are noun phrases using two nouns in order to shorten text. 1) View Survey Data When ...


1

Regardless of whether we think of data as singular or plural, the word response in OP's example is an (adjectival) noun adjunct / attributive noun usage. Attributive nouns are usually singular, as in He bought a car radio, but in certain contexts, such as They met in a singles bar, the plural form has become idiomatically established. Things get more ...


1

The form As physics knows today, ... Is grammatically correct. "Physics" is the name of a single science or field of study, and so is singular, and takes singular forms. However, this construction requires personifying "physics" which as a field of study, cannot literally 'know" anything. This is also not a very usual construction. In my view, it ...


1

More context and detail about what you're trying to say would be helpful (like some examples of complete sentences). But I suggest: As physicists (know / have learned / are aware), ... Possession of knowledge is a trait more commonly attributed to living things than to fields of study. That said, physics is a singular noun, despite the "s." The same is ...


1

These two pairs of words are indeed quite similar, and can sometimes be used interchangeably, but the connotations differ enough that usually these terms are distinguishable. Generally speaking, to accept something is a positive action, implying that you are at terms with whatever you are accepting and are, more or less, embracing it -- on the other hand, to ...


1

TL;DR In your example one you could choose to use any of "overcome his life's difficulties" or "get over his life's difficulties" (You actually suggested something else, "come over his life's difficulties" which you have since clarified as a typo). Your option c, "get the the better of his life's difficulties" would be understood, but to some speakers will ...


1

Your title is more clear than the body of the question. Are "left" and "right" significant? If so, "...left partition, the rest constitute the right..." is clear. If not, your title has the better phrasing: "...a partition; ...the other partition."


1

From the first paragraph we know that he got to 'throw away the useless items and sort the remainder in piles according to whether or not he would need them from now on'. The following comes the first pile was 'His school and Quidditch robes, cauldron, parchment, quills and most of his textbooks' which would be left behind; the second pile was 'His Muggle ...


1

"This" is referring to what happened in the previous paragraph. Most commonly, "this" is used for things like ideas physical objects, e.g.: "Look at this! It's a computer!" "This is a very nice website." Looking at Dictionary.com, the first definition of "this" is (emphasis added): used to indicate a person, thing, idea, state, event, time, ...


1

No. When you use "does", "did" then verb is not to be changed to past or past participle. The computer does not receive its updates


1

Signing the contract was a great victory / triumph for me. Both are figurative in meaning, and the choice depends on how much you want to emphasize your emerging as victor. I'd prefer the former over the latter because in this particular instance, a triumph is already great enough, so a victory is what I think would be the usual choice. In an example (...


1

There is a difference in meaning between the two given examples. In the first case one is using python to process external data. You are processing the pdf with python. The second is about the internal handling of data. You are writing the program in python. There is some flexibility here, and this should not be treated as a hard "rule".


1

The lecturer in the video is saying "pick a second point", he does not say "pick us second point". The auto-generated youtube subtitles are often mistaken.


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