11

The word left can mean leaving something behind deliberately or unintentionally (i.e., through forgetfulness). So, for a sentence like: I left my umbrella at home. there is no way to tell if that was intentional or not. However, sometimes context will make it obvious which is case: I meant to bring my hat, but I left it on the countertop. ...


7

No, "I Java" does not work in the same way. 'To google something' has become synonymous with 'to use a search engine to search for something', partly because of Google's dominance in the market and partly because there was no concise way to express that same idea unambiguously; it evolved out of convenience. When this happens, the trademark is said to have ...


5

If you're talking about Java (the language) I'd say: "I write Java" or "I program in Java" rather than "I do Java". You could say: "I can do Java" but it does not necessarily mean you are doing so currently, it just means you have the ability to write Java.


5

apprehend (v): 1. Arrest (someone) for a crime. 2. Understand or perceive. As with any "educated" vocabulary (in any language), using "apprehend" instead of "understand" in casual conversation may be considered erudite by some, but pretentious by others. You have to know your audience, and where it sounds appropriate. However it's not uncommon to see ...


4

"Hey there! Hi there! Ho there!" was used in an episode of Threes Company where Larry was a radio DJ. While in common speech this may be unheard of, but not entirely sure. May just be an outdated term or seldom used one.


4

Cities do not have remnants. Remaining parts of something does exist in general but is not an archaeological term per se. Remnants is a word applied to objects. Not a site. The proper term is remains: "Sites may range from those with few or no remains visible above ground, to buildings and other structures still in use." [Wikipedia] The remains of a city ...


3

This is a matter which each author must decide individually, but I can think of a number of authors, both recent and from many years ago, who did use the term "navy" or "space navy" in describing an armed force in space ships. Examples that come to mind include: Robert Heinlein, in Starship Troopers Keith Laumer in the "Interstellar Patrol" series Malcolm ...


3

Using to emphasises that this is a refinement of a previous model. We have come from a model with one variable and we go to a model with three. It adds the sense that we have reached the improved model. It would be possible to say "we get a model with three variables", and if the idea of "refining from a previous model" was not needed, this would be the ...


3

Using "to" emphasizes that a new model with a lower error and higher R² score was reached, a sort of accomplishment has occurred. The sentence works fine if the "to" was deleted, it slightly changes the meaning to mean "the result of the modification"


3

As a programmer, I'd say you "use" Java, or you "code in" Java. You can say you're a Java programmer, if that's your primary language, but it'd be very nonstandard (though probably still understandable by programmers) to say that you Java.


3

Language and culture are inseparably tied to each other. I would use this sentence, but I agree with Edward Barnard that "connected" could be used instead. Remember that even in the purely physical realm, one can speak of two beams being tied together by bots or by crossbars. When used metaphorically, "tie" does primarily mean "connect". Even where the ...


3

I found it on the way Typically I would expect this to end with "on the way home", "on the way to school", "on the way back", or something to that effect. This phrasing to me emphasizes more when or what they were doing when the object was found, as opposed to the object's location. I found it on X road/street For both of these, my inclination is to ...


3

I strongly recommend that NO English learner try to mimic the speech of what is perceived to be in style this week, or you will end up with some woman believing that you just called her a whore, which is definitely NOT cool. English is hard enough without trying to grasp the social complexities of adolescent and minority fads in speech. You may not sound ...


3

This study refers to them as casual smokers or social smokers: We investigated how adolescents define different smoker types (nonsmoker, smoker, regular smoker, addicted smoker, heavy smoker, experimental smoker, casual smoker, and social smoker) using multiple indicators of smoking behaviors, including frequency, amount, place, and length of time ...


3

The usual meaning of "apprehend" is "understand or perceive". (dictionary link) So I would interpret the sentence to mean "Understanding (how they could cause) social disharmony ..." It doesn't mean "check", it means "get hold of" either physically or mentally.


3

Yes, "raid" is OK. This use of "raid" is common, grammatical (with one issue mentioned below), and natural, in all three sentences in the question that use it. (However,the use of "raiding" here is unlikely unless said while the raid is in progress, or unless there have been a series of raids, as suggested by the comment by FyumbleFingers on the question.) ...


3

This is part of the technical medical jargon. A syndrome is a collections of symptoms that seem to happen together. Back in the early 1980s, doctors in America started noticing that young men were being hospitalised and dying with some similar diseases: particular cancers combined with severe forms of other diseases that the immune system would normally ...


2

The words are all have multiple senses, and the meaning in programming follows one of the existing senses of the words. Head, meaning "the first or top part of something" is a standard meaning in English. We say the "the head of the queue" or talk about "Section headings" in a document. Tail similarly has the meaning of "the end of something" Stack means an ...


2

I think that it would also help to know that context is important. I work at a restaurant - I am telling you where I work. I work on a restaurant - This would make me think you were building or starting a restaurant. We work on tasks. We work at places. If a person told me they worked at the railroad. I would assume that they worked at a railroad ...


2

I presume she meant something along the lines of: I don't know how her notebook got in my bag. Adding "got" makes it sound more natural to me. Alternatively: I don't know why her notebook is in my bag (why instead of how)


2

Your meaning will be understood, but that usage is not common. If you're trying to emphasize that you're staying with the person, you could use "stick with." I don't love him at all, but I have to stick with him at least while my children grow up a bit more. If you're trying to emphasize that you haven't found anyone better, you could use "make do with."...


2

I understand why you think it is vague and strange — this sort of writing is quite evocative rather than explicitly descriptive. Jigsaw here, in describing geometry, is used to give a sense of “many things that fit together”. So “crazy, jigsaw geometry” is perhaps an unbelievable, haphazard arrangement of many things which fit together to give some overall ...


2

Yes, "code snippet" is a countable noun, so it is perfectly correct to use it as you have. For example: The following two code snippets illustrate the limitations of the direct approach. I don't see any errors in your understanding or usage in the question.


2

Blushing is a more formal, standard term for emotional reddening of the face caused by embarrassment, shyness or shame, and "going red" is conversational and informal. They are not completely interchangeable. Someone can "go red", or redden, with anger or excitement, and we would not call that 'blushing'.


2

"due" in that phrase means "owing". This is saying that the amount you now owe whatever business sent the letter is {Amount}. The Final Balance now due is XXX. means the same as You now owe us XXX. Please pay us right away.


2

One simple way of saying it is "I got $50 change from a $100 bill"


2

You probably mean that script is a written text; "Game of Thrones Season 8" is a collections of episodes in a series movie and that they cannot be compared directly. You are right about it. One way to mitigate this problem is: You can write a better script than the one written for Game of Thrones Season 8.


2

Purely in terms of describing falls on the person by mistake, then I threw it would not be a good fit. To say I threw it implies intention on the part of the person doing the throwing. If it's unintentional, then, between the two phrases, it fell on me is a better description—because it has no direct agent for the action. Another way of expressing it could ...


2

Maybe you are looking for "field of vision." One can also say, "I put it where she can see it."


2

The word you’re looking for is squatting. Squatting actually describes a range of positions from butt slightly off the ground to upright with knees only somewhat bent. Here’s an example of people doing low squats: Bodyweight Squat Tutorial: Mobility Exercises to Get Low


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