4

Yes, it is wrong to say just “clean” in that context. To give the additional sense of removal you want, you need to use the phrase verb “clean up”. For example: Little Oscar pulled handfuls of soil out of the potted plant onto the floor. I used a dustpan and brush to clean up the soil. [I cleaned the floor, but I cleaned up the soil.]


3

The people are lying (down) across the (railway) tracks. The cat is sprawled (rather than lying) across the spindle securing the legs of the stool. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spindle_(furniture)


3

It is idomatic to talk about pushing something partly or completely into something else. Insert a garlic clove into each hole and push completely into the meat. However, I would note that "do not push the straw completely into the box" is rather adult language to use to a toddler; I would rather say 'don't push it all the way in!". Also those ...


3

Yes, "due to" fits fine in your example, but there are lots of other alternatives. In this context, "due to" means "because of", which easily slots into your sentence: I like to visit new people, especially foreigners because of the different cultural values and backgrounds they usually have. With some modification to the structure of your sentence, you ...


3

No, we don't. Pieces of broken glass are often called shards https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/shard We would only use crumb when speaking of a non-food substance if it was something with a soft texture similar to bread, such as rotten wood. For stone or (hard) wood it would be chips or fragments.


3

In the US, we (at least those of us of certain age) would call the item in your picture "roller blades" or "inline skates". Traditional roller skates have the wheels positioned like a car (two wheels side-by-side in the front and back).


2

In the US, The four year degree that follows high school and precedes a graduate degree is the Bachelors degree and is also known as an undergraduate degree. Bachelors and Undergraduate are often used interchangeably, but as @KateBunting noted, a bachelors is the degree, not the course of study, so; you wouldn't say, "I'm currently enrolled in a ...


2

Speaking as an American, I have never before heard the term "skate shoe". I've always heard "roller skates", or "skates" for short. Note that "skates" can also be short for "ice skates". The phrase is almost always used in the plural, like "I put on my roller skates" or "I put on a pair of roller skates". I suppose if you lost one of the pair, you might ...


2

You're right that 'stamp' for this meaning is almost exclusively for the foot, [ignoring the postage/rubber stamp type of meaning, or even mechanical/engineering to press metal into shape, which are vaguely related.*] You could, with a great deal of force, slam an object on the ground, but this is probably a far larger action than you are imagining; you ...


2

'Due to' is grammatically possible here, but it literally means 'because of', 'as a result of', 'owing to' and is most often used to explain an undesired result. If you need a single word, something like 'considering' could replace your original word. You can also use longer phrases in that place, e. g. 'taking into account' or something clearly positive ...


2

You're correct, a fluent speaker would not use "occupy" here. The most natural thing to say would be, "Excuse me, I'm using that." Depending on how forceful or polite you want to be and what rights you have to the kettle versus the other person, it might be, "Hey, that's my kettle! Get your hands off!", or at the opposite end, "Excuse me, I just boiled that ...


2

Whilst it is not grammatically wrong, I would not start a new paragpraph that way because 'that' almost always references something you mentioned prevoisly.


2

The verbs are open and close. I open a door, then I close the door. Doors open and close. The past participles are opened and closed. The adjectives are open and closed. The door is open or is closed. (Note that "close" can also be an adjective, but with a different meaning, namely the opposite of far. "The door is close" means the door is nearby, not far ...


2

Using hyphens in compound adjectives, e.g. a two-seater aircraft, a high-school student, a heavy-metal detector, is considered compulsory in British English, but US English is more lenient, and hyphenation is optional except where ambiguity would arise without a hyphen, or where it is desired to help the reader. If you're unsure, use a hyphen. Hyphens in ...


2

All of those phrases have roughly the same potential meaning when referring to pancakes. However we really only use two phrases in this context. flip a pancake turn a pancake 'Turn the pancake over' is also used, but the word 'over' is redundant and is quite often left out. There is no ambiguity without it so it's not necessary. With other objects ...


1

"Flip the pancake" is far and away the most common.


1

As others have said, the general word for a broken piece of glass is "shard". You could also say "fragment", "chip", or "broken piece of glass". Those words could apply to almost anything solid. "A fragment of glass", "a fragment of wood", "a fragment of bone", "a fragment of copper", etc. (You wouldn't use these words for liquids.) Small pieces of wood, ...


1

No, Tom. One doesn't do that here. I'm keen to try it though and am already compiling a list of songs I think might do the trick.


1

The Lions is a team. As a team, it can be treated as a singular concept. The team's name is a collective proper noun. However, if it is singular, it needs to be singular throughout the context: The Lions is a shadow of its former self. On the other hand, "the Lions" is a plural construction. When treated as a plural concept, it remains plural ...


1

"Of' has a very broad field of meaning. Here it is used in this sense: a function word to indicate a particular example belonging to the class denoted by the preceding noun See https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/of There are many types of bestowed honor: being president of something is merely one type. It is a traditional but perhaps stilted ...


1

I'm not sure this question is really about English at all, but I would still describe the flagpole's (intended) vertical dimension as its height. The orientation of the pole during manufacturing is irrelevant and quite likely unknown to the reader/listener.


1

The use of kind and car need to match. Singular: Any kind of car Plural All kinds of cars


1

When glass, porcelaine or stone breaks, it usually shatters. What you get are shards (larger pieces) and splinters (small, often longish pieces). If you talk about crumbles, I imagine very small pieces, typically created not by just dropping the glass, but for example by stepping on the glass or otherwise applying extra force, creating finer particles than ...


1

This is a roller skate. The wheels pivot together when the skate is leaned, like a skateboard does. Lean right: the front wheel assembly twists clockwise when viewed from above, the rear counter clockwise, like 4 wheel steering on a car. And then there's the strap on roller skates we had as kids in the 1960s, no practical way to stop except for taking a ...


1

We normally clean windows, clean the car, clean the floor etc. which means freeing from dirt and dust something that is dirty. So, telling a child to clean their pee, which is a grammatical sentence, is literally asking them to wash their pee. Orbital Aussie's answer is therefore correct but I'd prefer to say “clean up the floor” or “mop that up” (mop up ...


1

Not really different, squeeze is more of an action. We dont say squash in America. But i found it funny seeing the flavor lemon squash hi-chew and thought it had the vegetable squash in it. But its more like lemonade. Lemon juice with sugar and water


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