27

If it's too early to do something, that means the proposed activity normally takes place later within the contextually relevant time-frame. That's later in the day for OP's exact example, but I might say it's too early [in the year] to be planting flowers in your garden right now, for example. On the other hand, too soon normally means not enough time has ...


23

"Hi-fi" is a real word, in the sense that it has been used and recorded in dictionaries for many years. But it means a "high-quality record player" (or cd player etc). Typically one with a separate amplifier and speakers. It is short for "high fidelity". So you can't talk about a "hi-fi hotel" (unless you mean a ...


20

(The short answers to your two questions are yes, it does, and yes, you can.) The entire sequence of the mostly archaic "adverbs of place" is: Whither - to where Hither - to here Thither - to there Whence - from where Hence - from here Thence - from there For example, the popular song Do you know where you're going to? might have been Dost thou ...


14

Yes, Covid is pronounced /ˈkəʊ.vɪd/ (AmE: /ˈkoʊ.vɪd/). The first syllable is an open syllable and open syllables that are spelt with an O are usually pronounced with the diphthong /əʊ/ whereas closed syllables such as hot are pronounced with the vowel /ɒ/ (AmE usually /ɑː/).


14

There are a number of options Academic works is suitably broad and academic output is perhaps even broader They should cover most of your suggestions and also patents and software. Strictly speaking publications would include most of the completed work in the public arena including work posted on the web somewhere. They may interpret it more narrowly though. ...


12

/ˈkoʊvɪd/ Primary stress on first syllable. "co" as in "cove" not as in "coffee" vid as in "video", not as "vine" (nor "virus".) This should now be in online dictionaries, even if not in paper ones.


12

The simple answer is, unless you are writing in the style of an 18th century poet, don't use whither. The word is not used in unmarked modern English. The meaning of "whither" is "what direction" and yes, it means "to where". So if you are sailing on a sea, from a city and to an island then the first two are wrong. The last ...


12

Literature. The primary literature are articles written and published typically after peer review.


12

To hold something in the manner of your drawing is called cradling. If I wanted to tell someone to do what I see in your drawing I would say, Hold your arms so you can cradle the ball as you catch it.


11

This question seems to be about slang, which is highly dependent on location and demographics. "Hi-fi" sounds ridiculous to me in this context, but I get what's intended and I imagine somebody somewhere probably does say this. There are dozens if not hundreds of more "correct" (non-slang) choices like "good, great, fantastic, ...


11

We use 'misunderstand' about things that could be understood, or comprehended, to mean that the understanding is wrong. We use 'mistook' to mean something has been identified wrongly as something or someone else. To see one dog and think it was another, "mistook" is the most appropriate. Although "mistook" is the past tense of "...


9

I would guess that "feudlings" (which isn't in dictionaries) has been coined from feud + ling. "Ling" can be used as a diminutive suffix, for example duckling = baby duck foundling = abandoned child/baby who has been found princeling = young prince. I would understand feudlings as being either children/young people engaging in a feud, ...


9

The formal term for this is corpus, which means, all the writings or works of a particular kind or on a particular subject; especially : the complete works of an author This is the Latin word for "body", and you can use the English phrase body of work to mean the same thing.


8

"to mistake something for something" means to think one thing is a different thing than it actually is. Examples: "he mistook her for his wife" - he thought she was his wife, but she wasn't. "he mistook the mirror for a window" - he thought the mirror was a window, but it wasn't. To misunderstand something is to not understand ...


7

There is no rule agreed to yet because it's the combination of acronym and brand new. But most of people on a TV or Radio pronounce it as /koʊvɪd/. It's because of "O" in the word.


7

This sentence is wrong because it contains a double negative: "She hasn't never been to London." Can I use the word "ever" in this kind of sentence? Yes! She hasn't ever been to London. Don't ever lie to me! Not ever = never But not ever is much less common, and you cannot move it to the front as you can with never. Never have I ...


6

I would transcribe it /'koʊ vɪd/, being a Midwest Am.E speaker, but the exact character of the first vowel is highly dependent on dialect. For example, Southern Am.E would exaggerate the dipthong; Scottish would have no or almost no dipthong; and the initial /o/ may sound more like an /ə/ in some accents.


5

It's "papered over", as in the phrase "papered over the cracks". It means you're covering something up superficially, without actually sorting out the root cause. Like putting wallpaper on a wall where the plaster has cracked. The journalist is saying that the "impulsive management and imprudent contracts" really needed to be ...


5

Rarely (like rare, few, little, hardly, and seldom) is a negative polarity term, so the implication is that it crashes less often than one might expect. Occasionally (and some, sometimes, a few, a little) are not negative polarity terms, and do not have that implication. So you're right: it is out of place in your review, unless you're comparing it with a ...


5

The simple verb "fade" works well. It is slightly poetic. There's no need for a phrasal verb. Here is a recent example from the BBC The delicate petals of the white flower, measuring 11ins (28cm) long by 6ins (15cm) wide and sitting at a height of 12ft (3.5m) on the plant, started to fade overnight. "Fading" doesn't mean falling off or ...


4

If you want to see this word in the dictionary here it is. https://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=temporary Unfortunately, it is not a term that is registered in the dictionary. However, it did come up in this translation from Spanish, with a definition in English (look below to see the alternatives. Employment on short-term contract ...


4

"late" is an adjective, "lateness" is a noun. It is like the difference between "wise" and "wisdom". The difference between "joy" and "joyful". You do say "I am late", you do not say "I am lateness". You do say "Lateness is a fault I have", you do not say "Late ...


4

Balloons that cannot rise are still balloons, so you'd use a verb like tie. Deflated balloons are the exception, not the norm. That's why you'd use a verb that applies to both states of a balloon.


4

According to the Cambridge Dictionary, a race is a competition in which all the competitors try to be the fastest and to finish first ... so I don't think it's reasonable to call it a race, if it's about who jumps highest or who spins fastest. If there is just one single activity, you would call it a competition. If it is one of several activities that ...


4

Are you sure they didn't mean Wi-Fi? It would be normal to ask if a hotel or pub was Wi-Fi (means you can connect your device to their broadband.


4

No, I can't think of a phrase that would be used to describe this. "Cup your arms" might be understood, but is not idiomatic. The person would probably gesture and say something like: Put/hold your arms out like this. I guess maybe you could say something like: Hold your arms out like a <whatever it is you're trying to emulate (maybe "...


3

The first two are fine. The second slightly suggests (to me) more concern about just when the seeing took place. The third is wrong. You could say When was the last time you saw him? That would seem to me a more formal request about that time.


3

Whither is a locative adverb. Note the table at the bottom of the linked wiktionary article showing the relationships between where, whither and whence on the first line. There are similar relationships between here, hither and hence, and there, thither and thence. This is one of the few instances of English being surprisingly logical. "Where" ...


3

Yes, ‘whither’ roughly means ‘to where’. Historically, Germanic languages differentiated between direction and location. Some still do (you can see this in modern Swedish for example, ‘hit’ is ‘here’ as a direction, and ‘här’ is ‘here’ as a location), but English has largely lost this distinction. As a result ‘whither’, and the equivalents ‘hither’ (to here)...


3

If you stab someone, you will injure him; the blade will cut his flesh. If you stab at someone, you are trying to injure him, but you miss. (Indeed, stab as noun is sometimes used to mean attempt, as in “Let’s take a stab at cleaning that stain.”) “Scratch at” is different. I have never heard anyone say “scratch at” to mean “attempt to scratch”. You might “...


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