7

You can refer to the apellido paterno as the paternal surname and the apellido materno as the maternal surname. However, you cannot assume that all or even most English speakers will know what these terms mean without an explanation. If you want to refer to both surnames together, simply using "last name" is probably not a good choice, as it's very ...


8

With respect to your own name, you can definitely refer to both of your parents' last names collectively as your last name or your surname. It is also used collectively in the same way a single last name would be: for example, even in English-language bookstores, the books of Mario Vargas Llosa are alphabetized under "V". Formally, a last name made ...


6

"What is the organ shown in this picture?" "It is a brain." "What organs do these pictures show?" "This is a brain, and this is a heart." We use it to refer to something already identified, and this or that to identify something.


3

If you just want to use both names without having to explain the different system, the simplest answer is to hyphenate them into a single name. Some married women, especially those with an established career, choose to hyphenate their maiden name and husband’s name as a balance of maintaining continuity vs social convention. (Note that the children in these ...


3

It modifies 'to keep this sort of thing from happening'! Presumably the passage refers to illicit borrowing of library books. Library staff are employed for the specific purpose of controlling the loan of books and making sure that reference books don't leave the library.


3

Yes, possible as a joke. Machines and computers have "modes". Humans don't have "modes" so it is a figurative use of language to say "you are in sleep mode". This kind of joke or figurative language is very common, even if this particular phrase is not. For example I'll sometimes comment that someone is "In French mode&...


2

Your question has no simple yes/no answer. Your first sentence is correct. It is correct to say: The newest show has these known actors in it. The pronoun "it" tells us what these known actors are in, i.e. they are "in it"--in the newest show. It would be cumbersome to say: The newest show has these known actors in the newest show. We ...


2

Neither set nor tipping are used as verbs in that phrase: tipping point noun : the critical point in a situation, process, or system beyond which a significant and often unstoppable effect or change takes place https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tipping%20point set adjective 3 : fixed by authority, appointment, or agreement // The wedding is set [=...


2

Has the store kept X? This implies that the store had X at some time in the past, and you're asking if it still has X. Does the store stock X? This is simply asking if the store normally keeps X in inventory. Does the store have X in stock? This is asking if X is currently available for purchase, regardless of whether it is normally kept in inventory. ==...


2

You can omit then in this sentence without changing the meaning.


2

Yes, to grab on a concept is to learn it (or at least bits of the concept). You could also use the phrase "pick up on" interchangeably. https://www.merriam-webster.com/thesaurus/pick%20up%20on 1: to have a clear idea of The students picked up on the new material quickly.


2

The phrase "as soon as January" is correct as it is. "As soon as at January" isn't idiomatic. Here is a dictionary that shows "as soon as" as a conjunction when it is followed by a clause, and as a preposition when it is followed by a noun. Wiktionary "as soon as" conjunction I came as soon as I could. preposition He ...


2

Instead of: How many girls whose ages are less than or equal to 18 do you have? You could say: How many girls do you have who are aged 18 or under? or How many girls do you have who are under 19 years of age?


2

Something smells burning in the kitchen is not idiomatic in American English. The problem is that "smell" is not just a linking verb. It is also a transitive verb. I smell smoke in the kitchen does not mean that my odor changes when I enter the kitchen. As Samuel Johnson once said when a lady told him that he smelled, "No, madame, you smell;...


1

Almost right, but each time the thread goes between the two pieces of fabric or skin that we wish to join, it's a stitch. We use the number of stitches as an indicator of the severity of the wound. To describe your photograph, you would say He had to have 13 stitches in his head.


1

I have a cousin living in the UK who is a social therapist, and she calls them "clients". Yes, I was also surprised when I first heard that. However, I think the term "client" helps the person in therapy to be less emotionally attached and dependent on their therapist leading to a greater sense of autonomy. A psychologist or psychiatrist ...


1

You are a patient of a doctor or psychiatrist or psychologist, clincally. Business-wise (they have to make a living!), you are a client.


1

"Buck-toothed" would be quite insulting if used to describe somebody. It also specifically means that the teeth are angled forwards, protruding. Another term for this is an overbite (eg "she has an overbite"). The people in the photographs don't look like their teeth are angled forwards - they simply have prominent (not protruding) teeth. ...


1

Not particularly. I suppose it is a bit more casual in its sound, i.e., less formal, but it doesn't sound at all incorrect.


1

Have is probably the most general word you can use, in the sense of the last sentence. It's the state of being bearded (or mustachioed - now that's a good word) Keep works, but to me it implies a decision is being taken at a point in time - you already have a beard, now do you get rid of it or keep it? Your first two examples carry this sense of "not ...


1

In normal conversation it might be: Look up under the table. Can you see the note? This gives a context to find the note. Just saying: Look under the table. Leaves the person looking at the floor and table legs. The use of from in your original phrase is not necessary.


1

They all work. "He got ahead of me" suggests that you were trying to stop him from going ahead. It was difficult for him to go ahead "He went ahead of me" or "He went past me" suggest that it was quite easy.


1

Both are okay. In this particular case, it's undrestood. However, when you quote someone you repeat exactly what they have said. And, when you quote from, it's their work. That said, You quote Shakesphere, and better you quote from his books.


1

Good is and has always been an adjective. It is used as an adverb colloquially by those who do not understand grammar.


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